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Let's see how many songs we can get up to that are about the Liverpool area, or mention it or one of its constituent parts. The songs/tunes/concertos/operas/shanties can be from any era, obviously, and let's see how far we can get without reference to the Beatles or Gerry & The Pacemakers!

Only one song per post, though!

There must be hundreds, but I'll start off with one of my favourites:
"New Brighton Promenade" by the Boo Radleys
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZRcWgY619U
 

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"Maggie May" (or "Maggie Mae") is a traditional Liverpool folk song (Roud #1757) about a prostitute who robbed a sailor. It has been the informal anthem of the city of Liverpool for about 180 years.

John Manifold, in his Penguin Australian Song Book, described the song as "A foc'sle song of Liverpool origin apparently, but immensely popular among seamen all over the world..."

Stan Hugill in his Shanties from the Seven Seas writes of an early reference to the song in the diary of Charles Picknell, a sailor on the convict ship Kains that sailed to Van Diemen's Land in 1830.

In 1964, the composer and lyricist Lionel Bart (the creator of the musical Oliver), used the song and its backstory as the basis of a musical set around the Liverpool Docks. The show, also called Maggie May, ran for two years in London.

"Oh dirty Maggie Mae they have taken her away And she never walk down Lime Street anymore
Oh the judge he guilty found her For robbing a homeward bounder That dirty no good robbin' Maggie Mae
To the port of Liverpool they returned me to Two pounds ten a week, that was my pay"
 

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Long haired lover from Liverpool; sung by Jimmy Osmond.

"Oh dirty Maggie Mae they have taken her away And she never walk down Lime Street anymore
Oh the judge he guilty found her For robbing a homeward bounder That dirty no good robbin' Maggie Mae
To the port of Liverpool they returned me to Two pounds ten a week, that was my pay"
"Well the first time I saw maggie, she took my breath away
She was cruising up and down old Canning Place
She had a figure so divine, like a packet of the line and being a sailor I gave chase
Next morning I awoke I was flat and stony broke, no jacket, trousers, waistcoat could I find
And when I asked her where, she said my very good sir, there down in Berry's pawnshop number nine
To the pawnshop I did go but no clothes there could I find and the police they took that girl away from me
The judge he guilty found her for robbing a homeward bounder and he paid her fare right out to Botany Bay."


Lovely words, they would bring tears to a glass eye.:)
 

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Amsterdam - Does This Train Stop On Merseyside (Liverpool City Region)?
 

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The Ballad of Seth Davy (Whiskey on a Sunday )

The Irish have tried to claim this but it's definitely a Liverpool song, written in 1959 by Glyn Hughes, a Liverpudlian. It's sentimental but based on a real character, Seth Davy,a Jamaican puppeteer who performed on the corner of Bevington Bush (a street off Scotland Rd ) at the turn of the 20thc.

Incidentally there was a pub called the Bevington Bush on the street of that name, and this is the probable origin of the slang term 'bevvy' Glasgow has tried to claim bevvy but it's definitely ours :) see the Collins English Dictionary :cheers:


 

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That's a nice tale about the Bevington Bush, but 'bevvy' is *obviously* a beverage. Always liked the music hall style of Seth Davey, appropriate enough for a song about a man who died at the turn of the last century.
 

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Many Half Man Half Biscuit songs reference the band's locality. As a package, the 'This Leaden Pall' album's overall feeling of listlessness and melancholy sums up the dull, workless Sunday afternoon that was the Birkenhead and Liverpool of its time.

Out of that lot: 'Whiteness thy name is Meltonian'. For this line: 'I'll throw a tyre around a lampost as tribute to youth', which acknowledges a type of scally hoop-la popular in housing states around Liverpool at the time.

Here's the album's front cover, and remember the lampost is of interest, not the pub.



That was in Halewood.

The pub's knocked down.
 

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I'll ration HMHB to two choices (from me).

Stravanger Toestub

Bastard doorstep sockless stupid
Kill your laughter pain is brutal
Can’t walk properly for a fortnight
Deus Deus
Norway Reds in Bluecoat Chambers
The pain oh Momma the pain worse even than when I cut open
My kneecap on the freshly gritted slope and our village doctor
Cleaned out the wound with a wire brush
So now bang bang bang goes my plan (plan plan) to woo the peg lady
Colossal drag
Teach me to go barefoot

These are the lyrics printed on the CD label and I'm think I'm right in saying the only ever reproduced on a Half Man Half Biscuit record. They are not what is sang in the song.
 

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That's a nice tale about the Bevington Bush, but 'bevvy' is *obviously* a beverage. Always liked the music hall style of Seth Davey, appropriate enough for a song about a man who died at the turn of the last century.
It is the obvious one but maybe not the correct one. I'm still undecided myself . Maybe Bevington Bush the street had a particularly high number of pubs ? we are talking of Scotland Rd in 1900, probably more pubs per acre than anywhere on the planet :lol:
 

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Liverpool's influence on the world is huge and underestimated. But not this time: anywhere where British English is spoken people will know what a bevvy is. It's not a Liverpool expression but rather, like, I dunno, "bandied about", a word especially common here. There was a possible Irish vector for the word I guess as it's popular enough in Oz and London.
 

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That's a nice tale about the Bevington Bush, but 'bevvy' is *obviously* a beverage. Always liked the music hall style of Seth Davey, appropriate enough for a song about a man who died at the turn of the last century.
Er, beverage-drink yeah:) It might be the obvious one but not necessarily the correct one. It was long time ago that I heard the pub and the expression linked, perhaps the street Bevington Bush had a particularly high number of pubs,given that this Scotland Rd we're talking about which in 1900 had probably more pubs per acre than anywhere on the planet the link with the pub or street can't be discounted .:cheers:
 

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Liverpool's influence on the world is huge and underestimated. But not this time: anywhere where British English is spoken people will know what a bevvy is. It's not a Liverpool expression but rather, like, I dunno, "bandied about", a word especially common here. There was a possible Irish vector for the word I guess as it's popular enough in Oz and London.
Ooh :lol:
 

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Liverpool's influence on the world is huge and underestimated. But not this time: anywhere where British English is spoken people will know what a bevvy is. It's not a Liverpool expression but rather, like, I dunno, "bandied about", a word especially common here. There was a possible Irish vector for the word I guess as it's popular enough in Oz and London.
The Collins English Dictionary are quite assiduous in their methods for tracing etymology of words ,the 1970's edition, bevvy-Liverpool slang :cheers:
 

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Just to qualify my first post, Beviington Bush, pub or street is a possible source of the term 'bevvy' not probable. However, I'm pretty confident the term originated in the port of Liverpool, having recently seen the methods used by Collins to trace word origins, meticulous. :cheers:
 

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Liverpool Girl - Ian McNabb
 
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