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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Liverpool schools: Building work starts on £75m plan

Work has started on the first of 12 new schools to be built across Liverpool in a £75m council investment plan.

The project was drawn up by Liverpool City Council after the government scrapped its Building Schools for the Future programme.

Notre Dame Catholic College is first to benefit with a new building next to Everton Park Lifestyles Centre.

At least half of the £15m building contract will be spent with firms based in the city.

Seventy per cent of the contract will go to companies across Merseyside, dozens of local apprentices will be employed and councillors are talking to nearby businesses about becoming part of the school's supply chain.

'Exciting opportunity'

Mayor Joe Anderson said: "Our proposals are built around delivering educational excellence and improving the city's economic prosperity so that the schools truly help regenerate an area."

Pupils will use sports facilities at the leisure centre on Great Homer Street, and the new school building is set to be completed by next summer.

Head teacher Frances Harrison added: "We are excited about the opportunity this new building will give us in order to deliver high quality education for the future."

Funding has also been confirmed for new buildings for:

Archbishop Beck Catholic Sports College
Archbishop Blanch C of E High School
Holly Lodge Girls' College
St Francis Xavier's College
St Hilda's C of E High School
St John Bosco Arts College
St Julie's Catholic High School
Redbridge High School
Aigburth High School

Two more schools will be confirmed in future.
 

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When I first visited the States , more than 20 years ago now, one of the few 'dispiriting' things I discovered was the quality of the built environment in and around American high schools. There seemed to be a deliberate policy to create a duplicate, concrete only, campus model where the main building had an uncanny resemblance to a prison......very few windows and monolithic block facades.




I came to the conclusion that something had died in American public life....how on the earth could you turn the good life giving forces of a school into a forbidding menacing presence. Also unsettling was the fact that American friends sometimes couldn't get a handle on the British/european critique of the school buildings that were being produced although saving money was the default excuse.

It seems that in Britain we now want to tred the same miserable path, although using the marginally more uplifting tenplate of an aircraft hanger (or is that a just in time spare parts building).





I accepted the 'cash is king' reason for American public provision but I fear there is something more corrosive operating in the UK, that is the rotting residual influence of socialism in education which has visited upon us the 'exam passes for all' culture, the withering of white working class aspiration with the snuffing out of the grammar schools, the dabasement of the O and A level academic standard, the discouragment of competition in sports, arguments against the elitism (but not the inclusivity) of school uniforms.

A mentality that a school building is such a basic ulility and nothing else is part of the same socialist mindset. Inspiring difference, flagging 'best' and 'better still' should be supressed. One thing is for sure...when the new Notre Dame moves over to Everton Valley terminal B all idea of the history and grammar school culture of the old school will also be erased.
 

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The problem with that building is that the cost of building "iconic"schools like that pretty much killed off the program for the rest of us. They were seen as excessive and almost debauched in their approach to design.To be honest, If I could build 12 schools like Notre Dame for the price of 3 1/2 South Liverpool Enterprise Academies (£21m), you can see why the BSF program was terminated.

Personally, I quite like the design. I certainly like the monolithic scale of the new school. The environment will be defiend largely by the interior anyway, because this school is creating an Eden Project style biodome, where the school grounds are effectively inside the hangar. Imaginative layout internally and lots of light could be the making of this design. It is a pilot, so we'll have to see. I think they are holding fire on building others until people can see in in the flesh (inside and out).

Not soo sure about the socialist argument though if you are using the US as an example. There is very little, if any, socialist based activity within their educational system. The drive to reduce costs is very much a capitalist ideal.
 

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The public realm in the US is frequently dispiriting in its quality and maintenance. The state of parks, sidewalks and public buildings of all kinds, not just schools. It takes loony ideology to attempt to blame socialist ideas for the appearance of school buildings as bad as anti-commutarian America here as a result of cuts in the school buildings budget by a Conservative goverment. :nuts:
 

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One things that worries me about the new Notre Dame building with what I imagine will be flimy and movable divisions between its internal spaces (what might have been called classrooms before jets' Commie-Nazis took over the English language) is that it reminds me of the failed model of Learning Resource Centres in KBC that resulted in their director for education being sacked and hardly helped its results from getting off the floor of the city region league table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
£170m masterplan to transform Liverpool schools set to get green light

A £170m masterplan to transform schools across Liverpool is to be rubber-stamped within days.

The multi-million pound makeover, revealed fully for the first time today, includes rebuilding 12 schools in a £135m scheme over the next four years.

And on Monday the Mayor’s Cabinet is also expected to approve splashing another £35m on schools in the city deemed in most need of investment between now and 2018.

But the council recruited a task force of leading business figures for a scaled-down “Plan B”.

And this will now become a reality under the new project being funded through the sale of surplus school sites, council resources and money from the additional £130m handed to the city under the Mayor’s city deal. Mayor Joe Anderson used his mayoral manifesto to pledge to build 12 new schools.

As part of the city deal with the Government, he agreed that six would be centrally- funded academies free from town hall control.

Confirming the investment, Mayor Anderson said: “Our children deserve the very best education, and this investment will deliver huge improvements in the quality of the buildings they are taught in.”

Work is already under way on the £15m new home for Everton Valley secondary Notre Dame, which is moving from its Victorian home to a new site and will share facilities with neighbouring Everton Park sports centre, on Great Homer Street.

The school, due to open next year, will also be the home of Liverpool Music Support Service, which takes music into classrooms across the city.

Walton secondary Archbishop Beck will move from its cramped cul-de- sac to a new school on the former council depot in Long Lane and is due to open in 2014. With a sports emphasis, facilities could include could include a basketball arena.

Delighted headteacher Paul Dickinson said: “I am really excited about the school and the outstanding facilities will be great, not just for the school but the whole community.”

Croxteth’s St John Bosco Arts College missed out on a BSF rebuild and had been earmarked to open on the Stonebridge Cross development before the possible construction of a giant warehouse scuppered that plan. But, on Monday, it is set to be given the green light to be rebuilt and open on its exiting site by 2014.

It will be located nearer to Storrington Avenue and its sports hall is the only building which will be retained under the revised proposals.

It will be extended alongside neighbouring primary Our Lady of St Swithin’s to form a campus specialising in performing arts.

All three of the schemes will be rebuilt using an economic structure similar to a modern airport terminal building, which offers flexibility because the internal layout and even the entire use of the site can change in the future.

Others to get new homes include city- centre based secondary Archbishop Blanch and Sefton park secondary St Hilda’s which in separate schemes will move into new premises on sites yet to be confirmed, by September, 2015.

Also part of the masterplan is the rebuilding of St Julie’s Catholic high school.

It is set to relocate with fellow Woolton secondary St Francis Xavier’s college on the latter’s Beaconsfield campus, with a shared sixth form – opening in September, 2017.

The land St Julie’s leaves behind is intended to be sold for development.

A further £34.2m will be spent on major investment at other schools most in need that have not previously benefited.

Which schools qualify will be thrashed out at a later date.

OTHER schools set to get a slice of the £170m makeover include:

Holly Lodge girls’ college, in West Derby.

It is currently made up of 17 buildings off Queens Drive, and will be partially rebuilt through the construction of new buildings by September, 2015.

The council intends to dispose of the front half of the site which is set to be sold for high-quality houses.

Bank View special school, in Fazakerley, will be rebuilt on its existing site by September, 2015.

New Park Primary School, in Kensington, will also be rebuilt on its current Butler Street site by 2016.

Northway Primary School, in Wavertree, will also be rebuilt and expanded on its current site and utilising adjacent recreational ground.

The Department for Education have also granted funding which will enable special schools Redbridge in Fazakerley and Aigburth High to be rebuilt as early as 2014.

Lib Dem spokesperson for education and children’s services, Cllr Rosie Jolly, said: “Anything that brings investment into schools has to be applauded. We do, though, need do see how this pans out in real terms from the start of development,” she said.

The investment comes as Liverpool schools continue to thrive academically with not one school deemed to be failing.
 

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a well hidden line

As part of the city deal with the Government, he agreed that six would be centrally- funded academies free from town hall control.
 

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^^^^

So this is the picture, the reality of the coalition government 'too deep' cuts, with public services 'slashed to the bone'..............a landscape decimated, bereft of hope...........forlorn and starving unemployed folks.........oh....and don't forget the destitute children living in deep poverty

Et al.....etc........etc.......etc

This is all what cuddly Uncle Joe, must have been referring to when he took office and talked about his sleepless nights facing...


THE CUTS​

What a nightmare for the poor political virgin.....and all going on while the exceptional boom in investment in the city's university education structure and the cultural sector continued.

So many indignities for this great city to face under the hammer of the Con-dem coalition and facing the cliff face of a gigantic defecit.

Hall Lane improvment and Edge Lane extension....not cancelled
RL Hospital rebuild and Alder Hey rebuild.........still going ahead
Runcorn and Widnes link bridge planned and thrashed to life and going ahead.

The Labour party 'central command' school rebuilding programme facing the inevitable and colossal cost over runs and complications replaced by a locally designed and impressive 10 school rebuild plan.........why?.....because uncle Joe's fiefdom has been energised by new finance powers. (A far better house building programme is about to pop up out of the shameful cancellation of John Prescots glorious housing clearance plans.)

Meanwhile Uncle Joe faced the unprecedented challenge of having the apron strings cut from Labour's Manchester centric NWDA and other statist paraphenalea.......what a disaster for him.......a local politician given the chance to develop truly Liverpool city region centric policies and structures.



It all begs the question:


Just how much indignity can chinless Tory politicians and their lickspittle Lib Dem allies inflict on our great city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Liverpool schools' improvement plan approved

Councillors have approved multi-million pound plans to transform Liverpool's schools.

The city council announced the proposals to rebuild 12 schools and invest in several others last week.

It is hoped the scheme will create 400 apprenticeships and boost jobs in the city, as the council has pledged to recruit most of its labour locally.

The five-year plans were approved by the mayor's cabinet at a meeting on Monday.

The council has said it would benefit schools which had not been improved when the government cancelled the Building Schools for the Future programme in 2010.

Schools to benefit from rebuilding work include: Notre Dame Catholic College in Everton, which is already under way; Archbishop Beck Secondary in Fazakerley; St John Bosco Secondary and Our Lady of St Swithin's Primary in Croxteth; Archbishop Blanch Secondary near the city centre; St Hilda's Secondary in Aigburth; Holly Lodge Secondary in West Derby; Bank View Special School in Fazakerley; New Park Primary in Kensington; Northway Primary in Childwall and SFX Secondary and St Julie's Secondary in Woolton.

The project will be paid for with capital funding, receipts from the sale of surplus school sites and council resources.
 

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A terrible shame. In the current environment such huge sums of money could be used to transform lives and communities. It could help people train, re-skill and start businesses; obtain education and progress into higher education; start businesses and grow them to produce security for their families and wealth for the city. It's a vast sum of money, and yet it's to be squandered on new schools.

Excuse me, but I didn't notice the architecture in my primary or secondary schools. It doesn't matter to kids. It doesn't inspire them to work harder or study harder. There are schoolkids the world over in worse conditions than our schools who work hard and achieve.

How could a city, collectively, be so stupid as to waste such a huge sum of money on so little. There are so many real needs for this money, so many ways in which it could genuinely transform lives and provide opportunities. Now it's to be squandered on building materials that come from outside the city for gold-plated buildings the kids don't care about.

A tragedy made in Liverpool.
 

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^^^^

IMHO this is an important contribution to what should be an even more important ongoing debate. Exactly how vital is capital expenditure in the political and economic landscape. I've observed at first hand how politicians salivate over giving the go ahead for this and that capital programme..........All the political lights are turned on and it's like a badge of honour for them....if they are approving this road or that school building they must be doing something right and it comes with the added bonus of lots of free publicity.

In turn, they are much less interested in the dull revenue expenditue stuff . It's the anoraks who take an interest in the staff structures, relaigned payscales, the personnel...the cultural changes.

It's a fallacy of the left as represented by the Labour party. Keep on ladling in the cash and everything will be AOK....as grossly represented by the Gordon Brown era of grotesque budget expansion....culminating is those 2 fabulous examples of capital expendiiture heaven.....the school rebuilding programme and Lord Prescot's house clearance and rebuilding valhalla.

Both of which produced little discernible good....except to make a contribution to the defecit spending culture and over expansion of the public sector.

I support Uncle Joe's school rebuilding, if only because it's local, the buck stops in Liverpool......it's the epitome of what the coalition is trying to achieve.





.
 

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As part of the city deal with the Government, he agreed that six would be centrally- funded academies free from town hall control.

I repeat, that's half of the schools leaving tow hall control.
 

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^^^^

IMHO this is an important contribution to what should be an even more important ongoing debate. Exactly how vital is capital expenditure in the political and economic landscape. I've observed at first hand how politicians salivate over giving the go ahead for this and that capital programme..........All the political lights are turned on and it's like a badge of honour for them....if they are approving this road or that school building they must be doing something right and it comes with the added bonus of lots of free publicity.

In turn, they are much less interested in the dull revenue expenditue stuff . It's the anoraks who take an interest in the staff structures, relaigned payscales, the personnel...the cultural changes.

It's a fallacy of the left as represented by the Labour party. Keep on ladling in the cash and everything will be AOK....as grossly represented by the Gordon Brown era of grotesque budget expansion....culminating is those 2 fabulous examples of capital expendiiture heaven.....the school rebuilding programme and Lord Prescot's house clearance and rebuilding valhalla.

Both of which produced little discernible good....except to make a contribution to the defecit spending culture and over expansion of the public sector.

I support Uncle Joe's school rebuilding, if only because it's local, the buck stops in Liverpool......it's the epitome of what the coalition is trying to achieve.
I don't know if you've ever been in St Hilda's, or in many of the other schools mentioned; but they are long over-due replacement.

Environment does effect the general sense of well-being. I've seen schools where there are buckets placed about to catch water from leaking roofs; decrepit classrooms, staff rooms & toilets; and where many of the classrooms are housed in 'temporary' portakabins (which have now become permanent); where schools have had to close for the day because the heating system has broken down..... Most schools were built for smaller student bodies than they now serve.
 

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I don't know if you've ever been in St Hilda's, or in many of the other schools mentioned; but they are long over-due replacement.

Environment does effect the general sense of well-being. I've seen schools where there are buckets placed about to catch water from leaking roofs; decrepit classrooms, staff rooms & toilets; and where many of the classrooms are housed in 'temporary' portakabins (which have now become permanent); where schools have had to close for the day because the heating system has broken down..... Most schools were built for smaller student bodies than they now serve.


I agree with OpenlyJane.
Many schools have been in a woeful state for too long. I have seen school corridors and classrooms with buckets to catch leaks ! paint peeling from ceilings and rotting window frames.

A bright and improved learning space does make a difference to pupils, and of course a more efficient working environment for school staff.

The schools which have already been modernised and brought up to date look fantastic and not before time.
 
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