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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As Babs says, there is a need for another thread to continue the debate recently taking place on the 'Liverpool in the media' thread.

i hope this does not just become a Liverpool/Manchester bitchfest, rather we take the opportunity to share our views on the wider issues surrounding music in the city and the influence it has had on others around the globe? I would also like to explore what has influenced our music development over teh decades too, for example the well known 'Cunard yank' syndrome was going on well before the Rock 'n' Roll era, so what was happening through the 20s', 30s' and 40s', before the development of comunication technology was such that the city's unique drive could be discovered by the wider nation and the globe, for example?

What other countries, apart from the US has helped inspire musical innovation in our city?.. you know, that sort of stuff.

How does all this tie in with the wider creative drive, especially its potential for the future?

Of course, the debates taking place over the last week about the relative merits of Liverpool and Manchester bands is a fun one to continue, but our musical heritage is much more than simply that two city spat!

I would also like to see a discussion of more than what can be termed as 'pop music'!
 

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What other countries, apart from the US has helped inspire musical innovation in our city?
Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Cyprus, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Gambia, Nigeria, Cuba, Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Peru, Ecuador, Chile to name a few, must have had influence on the early Liverpool music scene. The links between the above, and others, were very frequent and Liverpool seamen were exposed to the music of these places. It is only normal to expect that some of the influences were brought back to the city with these sailors.

There is no doubt that from the late 1940's onwards the USA had the greatest influence and not just because of the trans-Atlantic connection, although it did play a very big role, but also the AFN broadcasts which saturated the airwaves. I know in my house the AFN was usually on all day. The only time we listened to Radio Luxemburg was for 'Top Twenty' on a Sunday evening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Two excellent points men. Liverpool's musical lineage is much more elaborate than the US or 50s' rock'n'roll.

We should also add that of the Celtic nations too. There is a good piece in the latest 'A' magazine (mag for RIBA) by Maggie Mullen, saying how when she came to Liverpool is the early 90s' she was invited to a party off Scotland Rd where everyone was singing unrecognisable Irish ballads (she is Irish herself), stuff that must have ben doing the rounds for generations. I also used to like the obscure songs the drunks would sing going home from the Hillside pub in Huyton!

As for the US though, I remember my nan saying you used to get jazz and country, western etc before WWII
 

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There is a good piece in the latest 'A' magazine (mag for RIBA) by Maggie Mullen, saying how when she came to Liverpool is the early 90s' she was invited to a party off Scotland Rd where everyone was singing unrecognisable Irish ballads (she is Irish herself), stuff that must have ben doing the rounds for generations.
That was the stuff of my, and thousands of other Scotland Roader's, childhood. But I also remember, and quite vividly, the "Doos" in our homes playing with and listening to others play exotic instruments which had been bought/traded/battered abroad for maybe a bar of soap or something similar. Bongo's, maracas, castanets, whistle, flutes and a plethora of stringed instruments of weird shapes and, there was always someone who could play them.

PS: I would, as a child, love to sit outside of the 'Morning Star' on Scotland Place and listen to the singing inside. Some of those voices matched to the Irish ballads, in both English and Gaelic, would bring a tear to a glass eye.
 

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Sloyne's got a musical arse. He said so on the Accolades of Your City Thread in CityTalk. Go and look!
 

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Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Cyprus, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Gambia, Nigeria, Cuba, Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Peru, Ecuador, Chile to name a few, must have had influence on the early Liverpool music scene. The links between the above, and others, were very frequent and Liverpool seamen were exposed to the music of these places. It is only normal to expect that some of the influences were brought back to the city with these sailors.

There is no doubt that from the late 1940's onwards the USA had the greatest influence and not just because of the trans-Atlantic connection, although it did play a very big role, but also the AFN broadcasts which saturated the airwaves. I know in my house the AFN was usually on all day. The only time we listened to Radio Luxemburg was for 'Top Twenty' on a Sunday evening.
... and surely Horace Batchelor, from Keynsham, spelt K-E-Y-N-S-H A-M?
 
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