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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am aware Cambodia is having the national exams recently, and I want to start a education related thread.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
How to do well on the national exams

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2012080157750/LIFT/how-to-do-well-on-the-national-exams.html

On August 6-8, high school students will take national “Diplomas” exams. Here are a few tips for success from Sous Sinan, a physics teacher at Preas Monivong high school in Battambang province:

Do practice exercises every day in the days leading up to the exams. Learn from teachers, with other students, and on your own. Self study is the key to success. The more you practice the more you will understand and remember! Also take care of your health, or you will fall behind.

On the day of the exam, come with your student card and know your room and table numbers. Arrive early so you are fully prepared. Don’t stress. Be confident!

First, fill in your name, table number, and exam centre, and read the instructions multiple times to avoid misunderstandings before you begin. Most importantly, answer the questions you know first.

Otherwise, you’ll get stuck on the difficult questions and won’t do as well as you could.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
One thing that inspire me to start this thread is when I see this question in FB.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...20281564.29134.129357243767342&type=1&theater




If you look at the reply from FB, you will find majority got it wrong, obviously, those response could be from kindergarten that do not know the answer, but if those response are from people that is ready to do their exams, then Cambodian education is in serious trouble.

We have someone comes in for job interview last week, to be a assistance in the fiance department, her CV say she is a university graduate, we gave her some maths question, she doesn't even know you need to do multiplication and division before addition and subtraction.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On the cheating chain

http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2012080157754/LIFT/on-the-cheating-chain.html

In the never-ending battle of trickery between teachers and students, there are no winners.

Cheating discourages self-development, ruining all chances of a brighter future. So there’s much to worry about, unless you aspire to be a swindler for a lifetime.

There’s ample evidence that the problem is a persistent one.

According to an equity study conducted in 57 institutions, “cheating plagues the educational system” and “discredits degrees earned in the Kingdom”.

Back in July 2009, Khouth Sophak Chakrya and Tha Piseth published a report in The Post, “Exam cheating a team work exercise”, revealing our favourite cheating techniques: consultations over mobile phones and crib sheets.

AFP reported a shameful case of fraud during the 2010 national exam.

“The students can cheat using notes they smuggle into exam rooms and bribe their supervisors,” AFP reported.

Thav Nimoul, a teacher at Dongkor secondary school, says the habit has a debilitating effect not only on individual students but also on the entire nation: “The students won’t be skilled enough to work. Consequently, it will result in lack of human resources and bad reputation on the international stage because Cambodian fresh graduates are unqualified.”

He suggests the next generations are also in danger.

Yet students have a hard time swallowing wise advice until it’s too late. Pech Sovannara, a student in year 12 at Porng Toeuk High School, is case in point. She sees that total neglect of studies is justified because all too many youngsters are occupied with their part-time jobs and household chores.

“I try to revise for exams, but because there are almost ten subjects I can’t memorise it all. Instead, I prepare ready answers on scraps of paper in case these questions turn up on the exam”, she confesses, adding that students cheat most often on social science tests because these require book, not general knowledge.

Chea Sovanna, who studies at a university in Phnom Penh, tried the destructive effect of long-run cheating on his own skin.

“I never focused on lectures, and would always find an opportunity to cover it up by cheating. I just wanted to pass and I didn’t care about my grades”.

Years on, lacking a high-school-degree, he admits to having trouble in keeping up with his study program: “Now I know it wasn’t right. University studies are very difficult as everything seems new to me,” says Sovanna.

The problem doesn’t end here. Bad performance can ostracise you once your school peers label you a dummy. “I feel embarrassed when I see my name on the ‘failed’ list’. No one wants to be my partner on team projects because I’m stupid.”

Sovanna is living testimony that cheating is a losing game.

Tharun Bun, a news reporter, agrees with the teacher in his article published in 2010 in the Post. He concludes that “children shouldn’t only be taught from textbooks -they should also be guided towards honesty and strong social values”.

He hopes that the government will give educational system more importance by “increasing wages of school teachers” – the only way to stop impoverished tutors from taking bribes.

It’s high time the youth exerted some effort investing in a better future. It’s worth a try – the prize is higher self-esteem and appreciation of your family as well as fellow Cambodians.

“I hope that next generations of students won’t follow in my footsteps. The future looks bleak for those who neglect education- everyone will look down at you and no one will employ you if you are stupid,” warns Sovanna.

Let’s take the words of our more experienced colleague into consideration and stop fooling ourselves.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When the teacher takes bribe, when the cops takes bribe, when the government officials takes bribe, it is teaching the kids of tomorrow it is the right thing to do.
 

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In the br i g
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2,250 Posts
One thing that inspire me to start this thread is when I see this question in FB.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...20281564.29134.129357243767342&type=1&theater




If you look at the reply from FB, you will find majority got it wrong, obviously, those response could be from kindergarten that do not know the answer, but if those response are from people that is ready to do their exams, then Cambodian education is in serious trouble.

We have someone comes in for job interview last week, to be a assistance in the fiance department, her CV say she is a university graduate, we gave her some maths question, she doesn't even know you need to do multiplication and division before addition and subtraction.
This would make Cambodia equal to Canada and the US. Most highschool students in north America can't do this. No surprise what so ever that a finance university graduate can not do some math questions. Most them take only one one-semester math course. That is it. Most of them just got a pass. Lots of them in North America.
 

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In the br i g
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2,250 Posts
When the teacher takes bribe, when the cops takes bribe, when the government officials takes bribe, it is teaching the kids of tomorrow it is the right thing to do.
The whole system is a failure. Rich kids and Kids with connections don't need to study, but get all the break. Unless this stop, cheating will continue because most students don't have money and connection to buy diplomas/ degrees.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
one way to combat cheating is to design open book exams.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This would make Cambodia equal to Canada and the US. Most highschool students in north America can't do this.
But I don't think they cheated, their view (and some Aussie as well) is there is no need to know, the calculator and computer can take care of these problem.

Sadly, most pocket calculator also doesn't know you multiplication and division before additions and subtractions.

Also, this is a Asian country, Asian country is expected to be better then the them, especially in maths.

No surprise what so ever that a finance university graduate can not do some math questions.
Surprise to me, how did people get pass primary school without knowing trivial things. What I do wonder is if teachers knows these things, or did they also get their job by cheating.

Most them take only one one-semester math course. That is it. Most of them just got a pass. Lots of them in North America.
One semester is all you need to learn these, we are not talking about Differentiation or Integration, Complex analysis, etc,

We are also talking about potential engineers, we expects them to build bridge, tunnels and skyscrapers, we expect them to design and build flood control system, etc.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
one semester of maths and you will have already learnt by 5x5 matrices(5 dimensions)
partial fractions integration, and intro to 3d calculus and imaginary numbers, but surpisingly yht lecturer did say imaginary numbers is the easiest part of the exam
Complex number is actually quite easy. Its applications to the real world is harder.
 

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MBRkhmer
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1,262 Posts
Hmmm...!!!! education in Cambodia... no way to improv any time soon.

After graduated become jobless... but job just for some who have relative bring in only.
Some after graduated then working for other job that they never study bofore... who care.

And most of government official get job easily as long as they are graduated from VN and just attached some moneys under the CV....
Oh I'm wrong not some moneys but they have their market price for any positions.
 

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Home Energy Reactor
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7,079 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
my uni UTS is an ass they just fail people so easily about 5 friends and another several other aquaintances have failed last semester 2 guys got 49% so they had to repeat no concessional passes
When I was in Macau, 60% is the pass mark.
 

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Premium Member
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34,143 Posts
Hmmm...!!!! education in Cambodia... no way to improv any time soon.

After graduated become jobless... but job just for some who have relative bring in only.
Some after graduated then working for other job that they never study bofore... who care.

And most of government official get job easily as long as they are graduated from VN and just attached some moneys under the CV....
Oh I'm wrong not some moneys but they have their market price for any positions.
I think the situation is not as bad as what you think. Well, their salary may be a bit low, but people generally graduate from uni (here in Phnom Penh) can pretty much secure a job without too much troubles these days.
 
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