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The population of London on census day (27 March 2011) was 8.2 million, an increase of 12 per cent from 2001 when it was 7.3 million. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) published the first results from the 2011 Census today.

London was the greatest-growing region across England and Wales, ahead of three regions that grew by 8 per cent – South East, East of England and East Midlands.

By comparison the population across the whole of England and Wales increased by 7 per cent to 56.1 million, the largest growth in population in any 10-year period since census taking began in 1801.

Jil Matheson, National Statistician said:

"I'd like to thank everyone in London for their support. The 2011 Census has been a resounding success and I am proud of the incredible effort that has been put in. It is a rich source of information about the population and its characteristics. Across England and Wales around 19 out of 20 people responded and we have excellent statistical methods for ensuring we have a complete estimate of the whole population. These statistics will provide valuable information for planners, policy-makers and the public for years to come. "

Most local authorities in London saw their populations increase between 2001 and 2011, although there was a decrease of 2.2 per cent in Kensington and Chelsea. Across all of England and Wales 17 local authorities saw a decrease in population. The total population of England and Wales was 56.1 million, of which 53.1 million were in England.

Nine of the 20 local authorities with the fastest population growth in England and Wales were in London, and Tower Hamlets and Newham were the only authorities in England and Wales to show growth of more than 20 per cent, with the fastest growth of all being 26.4 per cent in Tower Hamlets. The largest local authority by population in London was Croydon with 363,400 people, an increase of 28,300 (8.5 per cent) between 2001 and 2011.

The smallest was the City of London, with 7,400.

The 19 most densely populated local authorities in England and Wales were in London, with Islington the most densely populated of all with 13,873 people per square kilometre, which equates to about 140 people on a rugby pitch. Bromley was the least densely populated with 2,060 people per square kilometre, which is still more than five times the average population density of England and Wales as a whole which equates to about 21 people per rugby pitch.

The local authority in London with the largest proportion of people aged 65 and over was Havering with 18 per cent; by contrast, only 6 per cent of the population in Tower Hamlets were in this age group, the lowest figure in not only London but all of England and Wales. The largest proportion of people aged 19 and under in London (and England and Wales) is in Barking and Dagenham with 31 per cent; by contrast, 11 per cent of the population of the City of London is in this age group, the smallest proportion in England and Wales.

There has been an increase of 400,000 (13 per cent) under-five-year-olds throughout England and Wales between 2001 and 2011. This was particularly pronounced in London; where there were 112,700 under-fives compared with 2001, an increase of 24 per cent. Barking and Dagenham has the highest proportion in this age group with 10 per cent, and the City of London the lowest (3 per cent).

The total number of households in London was 3.3 million. The City of London also has the smallest average household size in England and Wales, with 1.6 people. By contrast, Newham has an average household size of 3 people, the largest in England and Wales.


http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/mro/n...-as-it-tops-8-million/censuslondonnr0712.html



So London has finally broken the 8 million barrier, and it should be noted there is similar growth within London's Metro Area :)

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/mro/n...-of-the-south-east/censussoutheastnr0712.html

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/mro/n...-east-of-england/censuseastenglandnr0712.html
 

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South East Nine
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1.4 million rise in 20 years.

Islington has also overtaken Kensington & Chelsea in the population density rank too.

London's population (8.2m) is now equal to New York City's population (8.2m), according to both 2011 census readings.
 

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That's a fair amount more than I expected, I was thinking London would just touch 8m. There was also similar growth rates across wider commuter belt and SE, Oxford, Guildford, Reading and Cambridge all around 12% and Brighton coming in at just under 10%.
 

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I'd rather live in a London where the population is rising, than a London where the population is falling (certain points in 20th C).
 

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Tfl need passenger numbers to keep growing in order to take a chunk out of revenue (from the growth) to pay back the debt used to fund - part - of upgrade works. If there was a slow down fares would likely have to go up sharply in order to plug that revenue gap or works cancelled/postponed (unless central government steps in with billions, which would be extremely unlikely at best).
 

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the term overcrowded here is just a meaningless personal opinion.

I can find enough areas in London that feel dead enough to make me wonder where all these people actually are.

Resources, usually its more efficient to share resources, why do you think urban development began all those thousands of years ago?

Economy - again show me anything that doesn't show the economic powerhouse that isn't a relatively large city? The whole point of a city economy is that it brings talent together and generates something more than the sum of its parts, you need a critical mass for that.

London after being the first city to hit the million mark is now finding itself compete with cities over twice its size.
 

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I'd rather live in a London where the population is rising, than a London where the population is falling (certain points in 20th C).
I agree - A city is stronger than the sum of its parts. Economys of scale, it is much more efficient for large numbers of people to come together.

If you want London to stay great then we need a fast growing population. China has 'unheard' of cities twice the size of London. The more more people we can pull in, the more we can contribute to the world. I personally would love London to pass the 10 million mark this decade.
 

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The question isn't if London can handle this many people per se, it's more whether its system of governance can. I personally don't think it can, there needs to be a overhaul since too much is wasted due to duplication of services and inefficiency, and mechanisms which bring in revenue are woefully inadequate. I mean you've got people in homes worth millions - tens of millions - paying way below £5,000 annually in a property tax, yet some authorities heavily dependent on central government to cover the short-fall in cash to fund services.

The problem is mostly political.
 

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Going over 10 million this decade would be nuts, that's an increase of 1.8m in 8 years!

I think a steady increase is a good thing, but too fast would bring huge problems.
 

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London's population (8.2m) is now equal to New York City's population (8.2m), according to both 2011 census readings.
Isn't New York's metro figure still considerably larger though, assuming they're calculated in a similar way?, 18-20m compared to London's 12-14m (depending on which figure you believe).
 
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