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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is a big one and I am struggling to find renders etc. but I am planning on going out to the site and getting some pics. This one will be with us for a long time and it will be fun watching it grow :cheers:

Long Bay is Todd Property Group’s premier asset. Drawing on an unparalleled urban location with outstanding views and a close proximity to the waterfront and the Long Bay Regional Park. When completed the Long Bay community will be one of Auckland’s finest places to live. Long Bay is only 25mins from downtown Auckland. The Long Bay Community will be located on 160ha of premier land and will accommodate approximately 2000 dwellings and up to 5000 people. Todd Property Group will be developing the Long Bay Community over the next decade, and first homes are planned for sale in the Awaruku area, in 2013 to 2014.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
End of year target for new housing at Long Bay


LONG BAY 1 by Urban+Explorer, on Flickr​


Private developer Todd Property Group wants to have its first housing sections ready for sale towards the end of this year at its 160ha Long Bay development on Auckland's northern outskirts. An information office with a cafe will be the first building to rise at the site, which is 25km from the central business district. But instead of awarding most of the housing contracts to Fletcher Residential as it did at Stonefields, group chief executive Evan Davies said the business intends to strike contracts with many housing providers to put up the 2500 residences. Different housing is needed so a wider choice of house builder is appropriate, Davies said, although he envisages Fletcher Residential also being at Long Bay.

Driving through the residential area north from Torbay and dropping over the brow of the hill at Beach Rd down towards the entrance to the Long Bay Regional Park, the northern ridge is now covered in machinery, earthmovers, scrapers, cranes, diggers, roading equipment, pipes, infrastructure gear and trucks. Beach Rd marks the boundary where Auckland finishes. Houses run out right at Todd's boundary and for years those residents have enjoyed green vistas across farmland and wide open paddocks. That is all changing. Earthworks are on the south facing slopes below the Awaruku Ridge and Todd has completed three seasons, initially creating wetlands, then moving to the Awaruku face and now civil works, bringing infrastructure to the site.

Stephen Martin, Todd senior development manager, said these seasons traditionally ran in the drier months from October to April although Auckland Council had allowed an extension of this season until the end of July. That will allow Todd to contour land for stages one and two of the project, each around 3.5ha. Extensive civil earthworks are needed because the land has ridges and gullies and some steep gradients and Davies cites remediating geotechnical hazards as the main reason for big earthworks. Hick Bros Civil Construction are at the site and civil contractors Dempsey Wood have been active there. That business cited the steep terrain in the area bounded by the Awaruku Stream and Long Bay Reserve.

"Key aspects of the scope of works include 400,000 cubic metres of complex earthworks, shear-key construction, a 2ha stormwater detention pond and wetland," Dempsey Wood said. Shapes of roads are beginning to form and one section near the southern end has the first kerbing and roadside parking bays formed. Attempts have been made to minimise the effects of intensive new housing estates on the beachfront and regional park by creating a buffer between the public and private areas. In 2010, about 23ha of Todd land went into public reserves to form a green buffer when the former North Shore City Council reached agreement with the company for public ownership of 18.7ha zoned for protecting archaeological sites, as well as 4.6ha for parks. About 20m below ground, sewage pipes are being laid and the first of two bridges will be up soon.

Level areas are being contoured for many kilometres of roading and Todd is creating a new vehicle access to the Long Bay Regional Park and a pedestrian access to the back of Long Bay College. Water supply is also being upgraded. Todd is installing a new water main running about 3km from the site at Glenvale Rd because the area was under-served. Davies said planning for the big project began in about 1998 but work did not start until last year, showing the almost insurmountable difficulty of creating housing in a city desperate for more supply and with generations of future residents facing renting. Westpac's Dominick Stevens cited low interest rates and years of severe under-building as reasons why some Auckland houses were selling for double the capital valuation.

Davies agreed and said that Long Bay was an example of a project where environmental factors were put ahead of people's housing needs. No prices for the land or houses have been discussed yet but Davies says the smaller sections could be around 400sq m. Townhouses will face reserve areas. Davies said much of the outright opposition to any housing there "had dropped away and it's more now about folk trying to preserve as much open space as they can and their attention is more on the effects of the construction works". Last January, clay wash-off for the second time in a month raised fears for the Long Bay-Okura Marine Reserve when residents complained of a muddy stain over the waters of the reserve, adjacent to the regional park, although Todd spokesman Sifa Taumoepau said then there was no breach to sediment containment devices.

Martin has been on the site for six years, initially working there when former developer Greg Olliver planned the project. Davies began around the same time the Environment Court delivered its decision and so was not embroiled in Olliver's fight with the Auckland Regional Council and other organisations. North of the 160ha Long Bay project, Todd also owns 113ha of farmland, outside the existing metropolitan urban limits, at Okura. "This stunning land holding has a rural zoning and is made up of 26 separately titled lots," Todd said. "The value of the Todd Property Group Okura land holdings rests in its location. "Okura has an amazing coastal outlook to the Long Bay/Okura Marine reserve and the islands of Auckland's gulf in the east, bordering on the Okura Estuary in the north, and the new Long Bay Community in the south."
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Developers fight to house citizens

Developer Evan Davies is behind Auckland's biggest housing push. But the battle took its toll and has left him disillusioned at times. As Todd Property Group chief executive, his team is putting up 5300 houses on two sites. Most advanced is Stonefields, Mt Wellington, an 110ha $2 billion development for 2600 houses/apartments accommodating 6500 people. Building is now starting at Long Bay on the North Shore where 2700 households are being created for about 7000 people. But Davies cites the controversial Long Bay project as an example of a development where environmental factors were put ahead of people's housing needs. The struggle to begin there showed precisely why the city is crying out for more housing, he says. Planning for the estate began in about 1998 but work did not start until last year, showing the almost insurmountable difficulty of creating housing in a city desperate for more supply and with generations of future residents facing renting, he claims ... MORE
 

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Finance Minister Bill English knows the issues well.

"The prices you pay for a house are ridiculous and they look that way to 24-year-olds with lots of student debt and the prospect of better pay in Australia," he said.

And he must have noticed Long Bay, Stonefields and Hobsonville prices too.

"The most unfair aspect of it is that there's no housing being built for people in the lowest quartile of income. Like none," English said. "That is clearly unsustainable. If we want to get back to surplus and keep it there, we cannot afford to have the Government providing growing subsidies to a housing market that then flows into high levels of debt.

"That cycle does not make sense and we intend to break it."

Quite how English will achieve this is yet to be revealed.
Is English suggesting he is starting to grasp that building sprawl like at Long Bay is in effect a subsidy to developers due to all of the council and government money that needs to be spent on infrastructure to make it happen? If so then there is hope yet.
 

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I hope the Unitary Plan will take care of some of the issues around providing more affordable housing i.e. better and more intensification (especially around transport nodes), removal of requirements that use up (expensive) land etc
 

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This is nothing compared to what's going ahead or planned in Ormiston, Karaka and Massey/West gate.

At least the former Auckland Regional Council managed to fight off more of this area being developed. Too bad the old MUL has been replaced by a less resilient RUB.
 

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I dunno, I don't see anything inherently special about it. This is just a natural continuation of the Bays
 

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Yeah, with that attitude we might as well sprawl all the way to Omaha. Nothing special about the environment there either.

It's taken what, 30 or 40 years to move from Torbay to Long Bay. Might take a while to get to Omaha.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am all for these kind of "village suburbs" where you get hiking/cycling trails, amazing landscaped parks with children's playgrounds, a modern town centre, a choice of finishes, different housing styles, well-connected public transport and close to the sea .... such as Hobsonville Point. I have seen plans for the Long Bay Town Centre and it is going to be lovely. What sets Long Bay apart from Hobsonville Point is the fact that it is located at a lovely beach and the nudie beach is a 10 minute walk away :colgate:
 

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I think the problem with them lies in attempting to make them well connected to public transport that is convenient for all who live there. It's very difficult to get cost-effective public transport to spread out village environments. I agree with a lot of the points you make from a design perspective (hiking/cycling trails, parks, playgrounds, modern town centre, different styles of building), but this can happen with proper TOD too with apartments (low rise to midrise), terraced housing and even semi-detached housing around a planned high-quality, walkable town centre and proper, high quality and frequent PT that requires minimal stops due to the compact nature of the development.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think the problem with them lies in attempting to make them well connected to public transport that is convenient for all who live there. It's very difficult to get cost-effective public transport to spread out village environments. I agree with a lot of the points you make from a design perspective (hiking/cycling trails, parks, playgrounds, modern town centre, different styles of building), but this can happen with proper TOD too with apartments (low rise to midrise), terraced housing and even semi-detached housing around a planned high-quality, walkable town centre and proper, high quality and frequent PT that requires minimal stops due to the compact nature of the development.
Hobsonville Point has the ferry option which makes more attractive as well, I do hope that they consider a ferry option for Long Bay one day :) I also forgot to add that I went to HP not so long ago and it is shaping up to be very dense - tightly compacted and feels more like an inner-city street than a suburban street - another factor that I love :)
 
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