SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
121,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lower skylines, lower revenues
10 May 2006
South China Morning Post

While it is still unknown how the government's proposed tighter planning controls will hit developers' revenues, history tells us that the impact of a height restriction could be significant.

In 2003, the Planning Department revised its Hung Hom outline zoning plan and rezoned the sites of The Whampoa - the shopping mall built in the shape of a ship - and Whampoa Plaza. The department added a building height limit of 52 metres.

The developer, Hutchison Whampoa, argued that the building height should be relaxed to 116 metres but the planning authorities said The Whampoa, the landmark of Whampoa Garden, and the mall, should be kept as they were to maintain the unique character of the site.

The planning authorities rejected the developer's objection that its flexibility was limited.

In 2002, the Planning Department imposed height restrictions on a North Point zoning plan.

As a result, Hongkong Land's Lai Sing Court redevelopment in Tai Hang was scaled down to take up less ground space.

The tallest it could get was 30 floors, with a maximum plot ratio of five.

But Hongkong Land objected to the restrictions and the Planning Department agreed to relax the height restriction to 50 storeys.

Kowloon Tong is the latest battle ground, where plans to restrict buildings have resulted in more than 130 objections from Cheung Kong (Holdings), Hanison Construction Holdings, E2-Capital (Holdings) and more than 130 residents.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
121,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Developers take planners to court
The Standard
Thursday, July 28, 2011

Redevelopment plans in four districts may be held up as the Real Estate Developers Association has applied for a judicial review of the Town Planning Board's decisions on building height restrictions in the areas.

The association, which represents major developers, said the board has unlawfully refused requests to amend zoning plans in Wan Chai, Mong Kok, Yau Ma Tei and Ngau Tau Kok/Kowloon Bay.

In a writ filed with the High Court, the association slammed the board for being unfair in the planning process, claiming that stakeholders - such as developers, nongovernmental organizations and individual owners - have not been given a fair hearing. Comments and proposals were not fully considered by the TPB.

The board also failed to give a rational explanation for the restrictions imposed on individual buildings, the association said.

The board was said to hold marathon meetings - in which members were constantly leaving and joining the meetings - with developers, which the association described as "unlawful."

The association emphasized that its move is in the interest of the public.

The board has drawn criticism for imposing restrictions on building heights, floor-to-floor heights, setback areas and distances between buildings in many redevelopment projects in districts such as Causeway Bay.

"When the height of the buildings to be redeveloped is limited, their values could slump 20-30 percent," said Raymond Chan Yuk-ming, chairman of planning and development division of Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors. Chan also added that some developers may even defer redevelopment plans due to the restrictions.

The total number of projects affected is unknown.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
121,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Offer made to clear the air in court
The Standard
Monday, August 01, 2011

Environmental group Green Sense wants to help the Town Planning Board in a legal fight against private property developers by producing a comprehensive picture of what may happen if height restrictions are lifted in some areas.

Green Sense president Roy Tam Hoi- pong yesterday said his group supports board decisions in September and October last year on the likelihood of air pollution worsening if restrictions on buildings to be redeveloped are relaxed.

If there is no height limit on buildings along the coast, he said, developers will throw up massive blocks that will block offshore winds, preventing polluted air from dispersing.

The Real Estate Developers Association has applied for a judicial review of height restrictions in four areas - Wan Chai, Mong Kok, Yau Ma Tei and Ngau Tau Kok/Kowloon Bay - because, it claimed, people were not given a fair hearing in protracted talks with the board as its members changed constantly, resulting in a lack of consistency.

"I understand that everyone has the right to fight for their own rights," Tam said. "But the arguments of developers do not convince us. They care only about their benefits."

Green Sense's opinion will offer a court a clear and comprehensive picture of the potential impact should restrictions be lifted, Tam said, adding that he is surprised the association claims its move is in the public interest.
 

·
If I could be anyone...
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
The height restrictions imposed are way to strict. I believe that a few major projects have been canceled because of those laws.
I believe a simple height restriction / plot ratio restriction was always flawed. Height restrictions and plot ratios are nowhere as important as footprint/plot ratio imo.

I'd rather have a 3 80 story towers, for example, than 8 30 story towers of the same size (foot print) on the same plot.
 

·
oh yeah
Joined
·
899 Posts
I believe a simple height restriction / plot ratio restriction was always flawed. Height restrictions and plot ratios are nowhere as important as footprint/plot ratio imo.

I'd rather have a 3 80 story towers, for example, than 8 30 story towers of the same size (foot print) on the same plot.
That's what I would like to see too, but I don't think that there should be a set rule for the heights.

Hong Kong should do something like Vancouver. Setting a known height restriction, but allowing a few visually appealing buildings to exceed the height restriction. Vancouver's intents are similar to Hong Kong - to preserve the view of the mountains in the back.

The result is a pretty evened out skyline:

Tonight in Vancouver: The World's Most Livable City by [travelfox], on Flickr

Vancouver at Night by jpnuwat, on Flickr
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top