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But I do miss the "chocolate bars". The variety and selection is better up north and those that they do have here like Kit Kat and Reese taste so different because of the high fructose that they aren't worth buying.

A Coffee Crisp is nearly impossible to find and when I did I had to pay 2.50 for it. The dairy tastes weird too. The butter here sucks and I'm only now used to the milk and beef.
 

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Discussion Starter · #324 ·
Was just in Minnesota, and was pleasantly surprised to see Old Dutch potato chips in the grocery store there. It's not common to find Canadian brands beyond our borders. On a trip to the UK, McCain frozen french fries was another surprise.
 

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Old Dutch is Minnesotan! It was started in Rosedale (Suburb of St. Paul) in the 1930s. They expanded into Canada via the Lakehead and Winnipeg in the early 50s.

And if you live in Minnesota (Mantario, too, for that matter) and eat Lays you're a bastard. :D Nuff said. Although if you live here and like Lays, you're in luck: No one buys them so we never run out! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #326 ·

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Go here.

Or, go to Wiki. Which explains it in full detail.

Or, when you're in Minnesota, read the back of the fucking bag!

Old Dutch was founded in Minnesota in 1934. A Canadian plant was opened in Winnipeg in 1954. Slightly altering their history to make them sound Canadian is an advertising technique that uses emotional patriotism to get people to buy products. ;) Not unlike how most American fast food companies stick a maple leaf in their logo.


^^ Not a Canadian company. But it has a maple leaf, and I bet their website has a similar altered story like what Old Dutch has.


^^ Also, not Canadian.

TacoTime was started in Oregon. TacoTime Canada is headquartered in Calgary. They frequently market them selves as a Canadian company. Like Old Dutch, they're legally incorporated here, but they aren't Canadian. This is their Canadian site.

I'm sure you can find hundreds of these. It's a very common technique.
 

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Old Dutch used to use peanut oil, which imo makes the best chips. I'll never forget the time
around the late 60's when they introduced "Salt and Vinegar" flavour... I almost fell off my bike from the burst of flavour!! LOL (we ate pretty bland food when I was young.....)

I remember once when I was in high school, there was a strike at the Canadian Old Dutch factories (which was a mini crisis to us). Fortunately they shipped in chips from the American factories to quell riots... but I do remember feeling ripped off that the American Old Dutch BarB-Que chips had waaaay more flavour on them than the Canadian ones....

A Coffee Crisp is nearly impossible to find and when I did I had to pay 2.50 for it.

Coffee Crisp is, in my opinion, does not taste the same as it used to. It used to actually taste of coffee. A year or so ago they released a special edition Coffee Crisp ... I can't remember which one, but I believe it was the dark chocolate one. It tasted like the ones from years ago... Kit Kat, on the other hand, tastes the same to me as it has always tasted. Mr Freeze's taste the same now as they did in the 60's. I always thought Dad's Cookies were Canadian, til I googled it.... they originally came from Scotland, and went to California around 1900..
 

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Yes, my grandmother grew up in the 1930s as well and seems to have no problem making food that tastes like socks.

Now they use canola oil. Everyone uses canola oil. But they've got the best flavours. I got two bags of chips yesterday - PC Brand smokey barbecue, and Old Dutch smokey barbeque. I ate the PC one first and though it was great, but the Old Dutch was still better. :p And their Buffalo Wing flavour is amazing. Only Kettle Cooked has a better version. (And those are expensive so I only get them forspecial.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #332 · (Edited)
Thanks for the link Vid, but I'd prefer something more concrete than that link. I'm not disputing your claim, but that link really doesn't say much at all. If you read between the lines, all it says was a that a snack food company started in 1934 in the heart of the upper midwest. Was that Old Dutch, or did Old Dutch acquire some 1934 midwest snack food maker which later became Old Dutch USA?

They've been very careful about the language they've used. If you went to a GM Canada site you could easily say 'it all started here in Oshawa, Ontario in reference to McLaughlin's carriage company. If that carriage company pre-dated GM in Michigan it wouldn't mean GM was founded in Canada. All it would mean is that GM bought a company that pre-dates it and that the acquired firm now operates under the GM banner.

You may be correct about Old Dutch starting in Minnesota, but that link you provided raises more questions than it answers. It sounds fishy to me.

In the end, what constitutes Canadian? Is Canada Dry Canadian? It started here, but has been owned by foreigners and run from a head office in a foreign country for most of that brand's life. Canada Dry may be Canadian in origin, but I consider it a British brand. It is owned and managed out of the UK.

Conversely, Old Dutch, is owned and managed out of Canada. It should qualify as not only a Canadian company, but a Canadian brand.

Other snack food brands to consider: Coffee Crisp, Sweet Marie, Pep, Cherry Blossom, and Jersey Milk. All foreign owned, but brands rooted in Canada and only recently owned by foreigners. Coffee Crisp is a Canadian brand that has managed to move beyond Canada, and is now available in a number of countries. It will probably be a brand that will eventually be managed globally from a foreign head office, possibly Vevey, Switzerland. In other words, it will go the way of Canada Dry.
 

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Well, I grew up out West, and it was pretty well understood that Old Dutch was an American company that branched to Canada. Canada Dry was originally Canadian, but as we know now it is no longer.


How about I just buy the stuff thats made in BC
therein lies the danger... if everyone in the world buys only locally, nations like Canada get screwed royally. We are a major trading nation, and trade goes two ways. I say buy local, or nationally if you can, but don't be obsessive or manic about it. Someone somewhere else in the world is buying something Canadian as part of the balance.
 

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Well, I grew up out West, and it was pretty well understood that Old Dutch was an American company that branched to Canada. Canada Dry was originally Canadian, but as we know now it is no longer.
you grew up in the west? exactly where?
 

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cool.

o_o...but Manitoba is more like Central Canada, or at least the geographic centre. West of Manitoba could be considered as west.
 

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Trust me. Manitobans ALL consider themselves Westerners because it is
one of the Prairie Provinces! ;)
He takes out the same red marker used in "The Day After Tomorrow," and abruptly draws a red line down the centre of Canada in a map...splitting Canada into two where the Manitoba is. And he says, "Mr. Prime Minister, we must evacuate the western half to British Columbia. Everybody east of this red line must stay put and cope the best they can...it is too late for them.

Totally random. Sorry, just couldn't resist....just read an article in the Vancouver Sun about what it would Canada be like if an asteroid hit Lake Ontario and wiped out the Golden Horseshoe and Southern Quebec - the populated areas.:cheers:
 
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