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MAGIC BUKOVINA, A PROVINCE IN NORTHERN ROMANIA






Because the number of interesting photos from Bukovina and Transylvania available online considerably exced the number of photos from other provinces of Romania, thus leading to many of them to stay not presented (as in the Photo Encyclopedia of Romania thread I try to present all provinces with equilibrated ratios of posts), I will create two dedicated threads, one for each of these provinces.



Feel free to post in this thead but respect these rules:
- post only photos with the larger side of 1,600 pixels
- post only photos of good artistic quality (composition, luminosity etc), that are interesting in some photographic sense, not only informative
- present only objectives (places, villages, buildings) or aspects that have not been presented in threads on General Photography section, to avoid being repetitive
- post only photos of good technical quality, not excesively compressed and so.











BUKOVINA, THE MAGIC LAND OF FORESTS AND PAINTED MONASTERIES









Bukovina is a historical province shared by Romania and Ukraine. Historically, it was not a separated entity until 1775, when the Austro - Hungarian Empire annexed it. Before that, it was just the oldest and finest part of Moldavia, called "The Upper Land", while the rest of Moldavia was called "The Lower Land". Here was founded the medieval Moldavian State in 14th century and here were the first capital cities: Baia, Siret and Suceava.
The total area of Romanian and Ukrainian Bukovina is 10,441 km². In Romania, Bukovina coresponds with Suceava County, which includes in its southern parts some areas that historically never been part of Bukovina. In 1774, the province had 85,33% Romanian population, 10,66% Ukrainians, 4% others. In 1900, the figures were like this: 31,4% Romanians, 40,8% Ukrainians, 27,8% others. This was the effect of immigrationist policy of Austrian government, which encouraged Ukrainians and other foreigners to establish here. Austrians even given a name in foreign language to this territory, derived from the common Slavic form of buk, meaning beech tree.
In 1918, the Romanian, Jewish and German population of the province voted for unification with the Kingdom of Romania and between 1918 and 1940, the entire Bukovina was part of Romania. Following the secret agreement between nazi Germany and soviet union in 1939, called Molotov - Ribbentrop Pact, Russia claimed the northern part of Bukovina. In the next years, tens of thousands of Romanians from here have been deported, or fleed into Romania. Thousands were killed by soviet army in pogroms similar to the ones against Poles. You can read more on the Wikipedia page about this dark period.
Today, the wounds of the past are mostly gone, except the sadness of the Romanians left in Ukraine, who for decades were deprived of education in native language and other rights.

To not be accussed of propaganda, I will present only images from the Romanian part of Bukovina. If someone else want to post photos from northern part, is welcomed anyway.
 

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Ressurection Church in Suceava

RESSURECTION CHURCH IN SUCEAVA





Built in 1551, it is one of the several 16th century churches in city. It succeded several wooden versions and a stone one, that existed here between 14th and 15th centuries. In 1780, it was given by the Austrian emperor to the Catholic population of the city, that grew after the annexation of the province. In 18th century suffered modifications aiming at adapting it to the Catholic practices. In 1923 it was given back to the Orthodox community.



 
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