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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Regional shippers wake up to demand for greener logistics
6 December 2010
South China Morning Post

Shipping one pair of shoes 18,650 kilometres from Shenzhen to Hamburg creates about 372 grams of carbon dioxide, but driving a car 20 kilometres to the shoe shop in Hamburg creates almost 10 times more, at around 3,700 grams.

Shipping that same pair of shoes by a different route between Shenzhen and Hamburg can also cut carbon dioxide emissions for the shipping company by a further 630 tonnes.

The figures may not seem much but shipping lines, their cargo owning customers and ports are realising the impact changes in the mode and route of cargo can have on cutting emissions.

Similarly, shipping firms and ports are also using this focus on emissions reduction to appeal to more environmentally aware customers to boost business, although both container carriers and ports agree these tend to be in Europe rather than Asia.

But attitudes are changing. Orient Overseas Container Lines, South Korea's Hanjin Shipping and Maersk are among just a handful of box shipping firms that have so far introduced a carbon calculator for their customers. This allows the likes of Wal-Mart or Tesco to input the origin and destination of their cargo and work out the total carbon dioxide emissions depending on the mode and route.

So, shipping 1,000 tonnes of shoes from Guangzhou to St Louis in the US mid-west would create more than 205 tonnes of carbon dioxide if shipped by OOCL via ship, road and rail and 177 tonnes if transported by Hanjin Shipping.

The difference in figures comes from the shorter overall route offered by Hanjin compared with OOCL. In Britain, the ports of Liverpool and Manchester are promoting themselves to shipping lines, logistics companies and cargo owners based on the emissions savings that are possible.

Stephen Carr, head of business development for Peel Ports Mersey, pointed out that shipping a container to Liverpool or Manchester by ship via Antwerp would save around 50 per cent of the carbon dioxide emissions of trucking the same box from Felixstowe.

Commenting on the use of OOCL's carbon calculator, spokeswoman Lynne Mulholland said: "I wouldn't say the calculator is being used to make route/carrier choices just yet, but it's definitely one of the considerations involved. It will become more and more relevant; even in the past year the number of customers asking about emissions data has increased dramatically." Mulholland said that there had been an average of 475 users of the carbon calculator per month from countries such as mainland China, Japan, the United States and Europe. The number of new visitors was growing by 60 per cent to 70 per cent a month. The most popular port pairings include Shanghai-New York, Hong Kong-Seattle and Hong Kong-Japan.

Hanjin Shipping spokeswoman Sonya Cho said the firm's carbon calculator had attracted an average of 1,000 hits a month in the first six months of its launch last December. "We do monitor to see how often our customers use our carbon calculator. However, we have not yet investigated if they actually use it when choosing routes/carriers."

Tim Smith, chief executive for Maersk Line's North Asia region, said: "Broadly I think we are trying to offer customers a quick way to check the carbon impact of a particular routing as a starting point for a more detailed discussion. Having the carbon calculator offers customers the chance to do a quick check to compare routings or suppliers."

Firms such as Li & Fung, Starbucks Coffee and the Puma sportswear group are already using detailed carbon calculators to track and help reduce the emissions in their supply chains and trade routes.

But there are issues including a lack of data about the potential emissions reduction from differing modes used to shift export cargo from China. Asian ports have been slow to promote their environmental credentials compared with facilities in Europe and North America.

Smith said: "The more that can be done by barge or ship, avoiding truck and landside handling, the lower the carbon footprint. And for inland locations, the more by barge and then by rail as opposed to by truck, the lower the footprint."

He added: "Some ports here are starting to think about environmental issues. But I am not really aware of terminals/ports in Asia pushing environmental performance as a reason for cargo owners or shipping lines to use their services."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wasn't ships using the giant sails at sea to help cut carbon emissions and conserve fuel? I haven't heard much about this in quite a while.
Doubt the big container ships have that facility! I can't imagine them suddenly adding a mast and hoisting a few sails.
 

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Doubt the big container ships have that facility! I can't imagine them suddenly adding a mast and hoisting a few sails.
Indeed a mast would be ridiculous but these didn't involve a mast. They were computer guided retractable sails.
article:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/01/22/2143897.htm

and the skysails website: http://www.skysails.info/index.php?id=472&L=2

I find it remarkable that some shippers are returing to sails to assist in movement to cut emissions, save money and utilize a technique that helped move goods hundreds of years ago!

Quite impressive
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
S.Korea says to invest $266 mln in green ships

SEOUL, Feb 24 (Reuters) - South Korea will spend 300 billion won ($266.1 million) over the next 10 years to develop technology for low carbon "green" ships in a bid to reclaim its status as the world's leading shipbuilding country from China.

The Ministry of Knowledge Economy said in a statement on Thursday that two-thirds of the total investment would come from the government and the remainder from the private sector, betting on prospects that the world's shipbuilding market would turn to energy-efficient, low-carbon vessels.

South Korea is going after China, which won the title of world's largest shipbuilding nation last year thanks to aggressive financing and price competitiveness.

South Korea's seven shipyards, led by Hyundai Heavy Industries , have set a 2011 target of $50.9 billion in orders, 35 percent more than total actual orders last year, the ministry added.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Shipping giant Maersk lays out plans to be carbon neutral by 2050
Maersk says that to achieve its target, carbon neutral vessels need to be commercially viable by 2030.
Several ideas, such as rotor sails, have been developed for the shipping industry over the last few years.
Dec 5, 2018
CNBC Excerpt

Global shipping business A.P. Moller-Maersk has set itself the goal of reaching "carbon neutrality" by 2050.

In an announcement Tuesday, Maersk said that to achieve its target, carbon neutral vessels would need to be commercially viable by 2030.

The company said its relative carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions had already been cut by 46 percent against a 2007 baseline, adding that this was approximately 9 percent more than the industry average.

In 2012, international shipping was responsible for an estimated 796 million tons of CO2 emissions — around 2.2 percent of total global CO2 emissions that year, according to the International Maritime Organization.

"The only possible way to achieve the so-much-needed decarbonization in our industry is by fully transforming to new carbon neutral fuels and supply chains," Soren Toft, A.P. Moller-Maersk's chief operating officer, said in a statement.

Toft added that the next five to 10 years would be crucial. "We will invest significant resources for innovation and fleet technology to improve the technical and financial viability of decarbonized solutions," he said.

Toft added that the last four years had seen Maersk invest roughly $1 billion and engage over 50 engineers per year in the development and deployment of "energy efficient solutions." Going forward, he added, the business could not do this alone.

More : https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/05/maersk-lays-out-plans-to-be-carbon-neutral-by-2050.html
 

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Dec 17, 2018 - 12:39 pm
Norway commissions high speed hydrogen ferry

Norway is funding a hydrogen-powered high speed ferry and a short-sea freighter through their PILOT-E programme. They awarded a grant to Hyon, a joint venture between Nel, Hexagon Composites and PowerCell Sweden to realise the project together with partners.

HYON established in 2017, provides customers from the maritime sector with one point of contact for all things hydrogen, from production over distribution and storage to dispensing systems and fuel cells.

To realise the new fuel cell vessels envisioned by the PILOT-E scheme however, HYON has to team up with ship building partners naturally. In detail, the projects are:

Project ZEFF stands for Zero Emission Fast Ferry. The vessel will utilise foils that lift the vessel out of the water and will have cruise speed between 25 and 45 knots, that is up to 83 kilometres an hour. Fuel cells and batteries will power the vessel to such high speeds, carrying 100 to 300 passengers.

More: https://www.electrive.com/2018/12/17/norway-commissions-high-speed-hydrogen-ferry/



Norled to develop the world's first hydrogen ferry

Norled has won the tender for the world’s first hydrogen-electrical ferry. The project is a new and major step in the green shift in the maritime sector. It is also a confirmation of the NCE Maritime CleanTech cluster’s world-leading position within the development of new green maritime solutions.

The ferry will be in operation from April 15 2021.

More: https://maritimecleantech.no/2018/11/30/norled-to-develop-the-worlds-first-hydrogen-ferry/
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
New clean shipping fuel rules, but who polices the polluters?
Excerpt
19 December 2019

LONDON (Reuters) - Sweeping new fuel rules aiming to cut pollution belching from ships and save lives are now just a couple of weeks away but with no central policing agency and several countries still not signed up to them, compliance is a major concern.

From January 2020, ships must use fuel with a sulfur content of 0.5%, down from 3.5%, or install devices that strip out the toxic pollutant - known as scrubbers.

As a result, refiners and shipping companies will spend billions of dollars in the years ahead on ensuring fuel and engines comply.

But enforcement of the United Nations convention on cleaner fuels - known as MARPOL Annex VI - rests with individual countries and flag states, meaning for some routes and regions, compliance is already looking patchy.

A handful of major states resisted pressure this month at the U.N.'s COP25 climate talks in Madrid to ramp up efforts to combat global warming, underscoring a need for collective action to cut carbon emissions and wider pollution.

Despite two decades in the making, countries such as Israel and New Zealand have been unable to sign up in time for the 2020 IMO start date, while others such as Malaysia are considering how to apply the rules.

"I am sure there will be pockets (of non-compliance) initially," said Guy Platten, secretary general of the International Chamber of Shipping association.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...s-but-who-polices-the-polluters-idUSKBN1YN1UD
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shipping players look to cut carbon emissions with vessel powered by ammonia
Excerpt

LONDON, Jan 15 (Reuters) - A shipbuilder and engine maker are among leading companies looking to develop a vessel that can run on ammonia as part of efforts to speed up carbon reductions in shipping through cleaner fuel options, officials said on Wednesday.

The new project aims to design an oil tanker that can be fuelled with ammonia and whose technology can be adapted to other types of ships, officials say.

It brings together engine maker MAN Energy Solutions , shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries, ship classification society Lloyd's Register and maritime energy services company MISC Berhad.

International shipping accounts for 2.2% of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), more than aviation's 2% share.

The IMO, a United Nations agency, has said it aims to halve greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 2008 levels by 2050.

Investor and activist pressure is prompting companies to look to step up ways to reduce the industry's carbon footprint.

High costs and potential safety issues have meant that future fuels such as ammonia have been slow to advance.

"MAN are working hard to make the engine ready for ships to be delivered from 2024. This suggests a best case scenario of full design work completed such that a commercial ship building contract could be placed in 2022 for delivery in 2024," marine & offshore director at Lloyd's Register Nick Brown told Reuters.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...-with-vessel-powered-by-ammonia-idUSKBN1ZE2CA
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
China virus may cause delays of anti-pollution equipment retrofits on ships
Excerpt

TOKYO/SINGAPORE, Jan 31 (Reuters) - Shipping companies may face delivery delays of vessels fitted with exhaust gas filtering equipment that complies with anti-pollution rules that kicked in this year due to the impact from the virus outbreak in China, shipping sources said on Friday.

A Mitsui OSK Lines executive said many vessels were in Chinese docks to get so-called scrubbers installed to meet the new emissions rules but with four Chinese provinces asking companies to extend the Lunar New Year holiday by a week, to Feb. 10, workers may not be available to complete installations.

"There are concerns that workers may not return so soon to Chinese repair yards where many vessels are waiting for scrubbers to be installed," Takashi Maruyama, Mitsui OSK Chief Financial Officer, told a news conference. He added those vessels include no Mitsui OSK ships.

"This may eventually reduce the number of vessels available and may lead to a tighter shipping market," he said.

"Ships in drydock are reportedly lying idle without any work being carried out," said a Singapore-based shipbroker adding that in some cases even provisions cannot be supplied to crews onboard ships in drydock.

Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha's Executive Officer Yu Kurimoto also said people were not allowed to enter or exit some areas where there are many repair docks in China.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/shi...on-equipment-retrofits-on-ships-idUKL4N2A31PS
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Costa Rican hybrid sailboat aims to reduce shipping industry's carbon footprint
Excerpt
Dec 20, 2020

PUNTA MORALES, Costa Rica (Reuters) - Some 200 workers from 27 nations are building a hybrid sailboat on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica designed to carry 350 tons of goods, hoping to demonstrate that in the 21st century it is possible to transport cargo without polluting the environment.

Inspired by the historic Finnish trading schooner Ingrid of the Aland Islands, the firm Sailcargo Inc says it designed the vessel named Ceiba “to be the first of its kind in the world.” It will rely mostly on wind power with two auxiliary electric engines for maneuvering in ports and low winds.

“One of the most important things is to prove that it’s financially profitable” as well as be environmentally and socially sustainable, Sailcargo’s chief executive and founder Danielle Doggett told Reuters.

More : Costa Rican hybrid sailboat aims to reduce shipping industry's carbon footprint
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Maersk signs up to build giant European ammonia plant
Journal of Commerce Excerpt
Feb 23, 2021

A.P. Møller-Maersk has signed on to a project that will build Europe’s largest production facility of carbon dioxide (CO2)-free green ammonia, a carbon-neutral alternative the carrier has identified along with methanol as maritime’s fuel of the future.

The project is being led by Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP), the world’s largest dedicated fund manager within greenfield renewable energy infrastructure investments. The production facility will be located in the town of Esbjerg on the west coast of Denmark, where it will convert surplus power from offshore wind turbines to green ammonia in a process known as power-to-X.

Market leaders within the agriculture and shipping industries signed a memorandum of understanding with CIP in support of the establishment of the ammonia production facility. Maersk and Danish logistics company DFDS represent the shipping sector, while Arla, Danish Crown, and DLG represent a significant part of the agricultural value chain in the production of dairy, meat, and crops.

Financial investors in the project will be sought by the Energy Transition Fund, a newly created CIP unit that invests in next generation renewable technologies. Among the potential investors in the Esbjerg project is PensionDanmark, a non-profit labor market pension fund.

“We are excited about the opportunity to continue investing with CIP at the forefront of the energy market developments, beginning with the project in Esbjerg, and will present the opportunity to our board next month,” said Torben Möger Pedersen, CEO of PensionDanmark and chairman of the Danish Government’s Climate Partnership on Finance.

More : Sustainable fuel: Maersk signs up to build giant European ammonia plant
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Shipping groups tap algorithms to cut carbon emissions
Excerpt

LONDON, March 3 (Reuters) - Leading shipping group Maersk Tankers is investing tens of millions of dollars in digital technology to speed up cuts in carbon emissions across the industry, its chief executive told Reuters.

Global shipping accounts for nearly 3% of the world’s CO2 emissions, putting the sector under pressure to clean up. About 90% of world trade is transported by sea.

Maersk Tankers, which commercially manages the world’s largest fleet of more than 220 product tankers, has invested $19 million in the past two years and has earmarked a further $12 million in 2021 to boost ship performance and reduce emissions through the use of digital technology.

"There is a like for like cost saving for every tonne of CO2 that we save," CEO Christian Ingerslev said.

Last year Maersk Tankers launched standalone business ZeroNorth, which uses algorithms that factor in market rates, future weather conditions and bunker prices to guide operators on the optimal route and speed for their vessel.

More : Shipping groups tap algorithms to cut carbon emissions
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Shipping Industry Wants to Be Taxed for Its Carbon Emissions
Apr 20, 2021
Bloomberg Excerpt

It’s rare for an industry powered by fossil fuels to call for a tax on its own carbon emissions. Yet the shipping sector is doing just that.

Several trade groups, representing more than 90% of the world’s merchant fleet, have submitted a proposal to shipping’s United Nations regulator calling for it to prioritize a carbon tax for the industry, the International Chamber of Shipping said Wednesday. While it’s unlikely any levy will be imposed immediately, the call highlights the growing pressure shipping is under to decarbonize from customers and politicians alike.

The International Maritime Organization approved new emissions rules in November, but the trade groups say these won’t be enough to hit the UN body’s 2050 climate targets -- which include a halving of annual greenhouse gas emissions versus 2008 levels. Instead, talks on a market-based-measure that would put a price on pollution should start “as soon as possible and before 2023,” the groups say.

More : The Shipping Industry Wants to Be Taxed for Its Carbon Emissions
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Maersk’s Green Shipping Plan Runs Up Against Scarce Cooking Oil
Aug 7, 2021
Bloomberg Excerpt

A.P. Moller Maersk A/S’s efforts to become carbon-neutral face an unusual hurdle: there isn’t enough used cooking oil to make the biofuel that powers the vessels.

“The biofuel is sourced from used cooking oil, but the problem is that the world doesn’t eat enough french fries,” said Chief Executive Officer Soren Skou. “We can’t keep scaling it. If our growth rates continue, we will run out of cooking oil in one or two years.”

Still, Skou said the Copenhagen-based carrier, which controls a fleet of more than 700 vessels, is done ordering ships that only run on fossil fuel. Maersk has pledged to cut its own carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. About 90% of the goods across the globe are transported by the shipping industry, with Maersk accounting for one-fifth of that total. The industry is responsible for roughly 2% of the world’s CO2 emissions.

More : Maersk’s Green Shipping Plan Runs Up Against Scarce Cooking Oil
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Maersk inks deal to secure supply of ‘green’ e-methanol for vessel, targets 2023 launch
August 19, 2021
CNBC Excerpt

Maersk said it has secured a supply of “green” e-methanol for what it described as “the world’s first container vessel operating on carbon neutral fuel.”

In an announcement Thursday, the world’s largest container shipping firm said Denmark’s European Energy and its subsidiary, REintegrate, would set up a facility to produce carbon neutral e-methanol for use in a vessel designed to operate on it.

The plant would then produce approximately 10,000 metric tons of e-methanol used by Maersk’s ship every year. The e-methanol will be made using renewable energy and biogenic carbon dioxide, with production of the fuel for Maersk slated to begin in 2023. The United States Environmental Protection Agency describes biogenic emission sources as “emissions that come from natural sources.”

More : Maersk inks deal to secure supply of 'green' e-methanol for vessel, targets 2023 launch
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Daewoo Shipbuilding develops carbon dioxide storage technology
Excerpt

SEOUL, Sept. 16 (Yonhap) -- Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co. (DSME) said Thursday it has developed a technology to store carbon dioxide captured in ship engine emissions.

The technology developed in cooperation with a local ship part supplier, HI AIR Korea Co., will help ships in operation reduce their carbon dioxide emissions to brace for environment regulations by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), DSME said.

The IMO aims to cut carbon dioxide emissions from international shipping by more than 30 percent by 2025 and by at least 50 percent by 2050, compared with 2008.

More : Daewoo Shipbuilding develops carbon dioxide storage technology | Yonhap News Agency
 
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