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Thought this was a cool website; http://ournation.propertyoz.com.au/ & http://makemycitywork.com.au/ and wasn't sure if it had been posted on these forums and opinions from avid skyscraper enthusiasts would be essential.

Have a look around, some great comparisons like; Total Private Dwellings: Sydney v Melbourne. But here is the gist and main aim for the two sites:


The new deal for Australia’s cities

Our cities are home to 80% of Australians and generate 82% of the nation’s economic wealth. Australia’s cities are growing – how we deal with this growth is up to us. Our choices are clear. We can have more dumb growth which adds to stress on transport, jobs and families. Or we can have smart growth that creates more opportunities, higher productivity, better living standards and a healthier environment. Smart growth solutions require cooperation from all levels of government across the political cycle, not politicking and finger pointing. We need to address the mismatch of responsibilities between the Commonwealth, which controls the purse strings and population growth, and the states, territories and local authorities that manage cities. It’s time for a new approach. We call on Australia’s governments – federal, state, territory and local – to strike a New Deal for Our Cities focused on making our cities work. A New Deal for Our Cities has five simple elements:

1. A deal

A new intergovernmental agreement to align all three spheres of government around a common approach to making our cities more productive, liveable and sustainable – an agreement that assigns defined roles for each level of government.

2. Targets and action

A clear set of prosperity targets for each city, along with the actions that governments will take to achieve these targets. The targets will set out the specific economic, social or environmental outcomes to be achieved in each city. These could include targets for housing affordability, public transport use, urban renewal, location of economic activity and conservation of useable open space. Action plans would be created by states, territories and local government to achieve these goals. Some existing city plans provide a basis for these.

3. Incentive funding

New incentive payments would be created to ensure governments are accountable for outcomes, not just plans and promises.
Where targets are achieved by states and territories, they will receive set financial incentives from the Commonwealth. Where targets are not achieved, no payments would be made. These incentives need to be locked in and predictable. This approach recognises the national importance of our cities to Australia’s productivity, liveability and sustainability. Incentive models have driven successful reform across many areas of public policy for the last three decades.

4. Strong oversight

A strong oversight body with statutory independence – such as the Productivity Commission – needs to align incentive payments with performance.

5. Clear reporting

Learning from Australia’s best policy reform programs, progress must be reported publicly. The Commonwealth should task a respected independent agency to review progress and issue a scorecard annually.
The Commonwealth should also assist states, territories and councils improve their long-term planning by publishing annual rolling projections of population growth by location and demographic mix, as well as estimate the changing demand for critical community services. These projections should also calculate the fiscal implications arising from Australia’s changing population.​
 

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It would be nice if the Australian government identified key regional cities like Townsville and Darwin and promoted them for development into Australia's next 1,000,000+ cities.

It would be nice to secure some larger population centres in the north.
 

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^^ Agree. I think there's real opportunity in our 100k+ cities.

I'd love to see them designed around good PT to try to keep their compact size.

Good public transport near the city centres might discourage sprawl.
 

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I think that most of these 6 million should go into enlarging Sydney and Melbourne. Putting all our eggs in our best baskets. Making them bigger and more significant international cities.
They have both almost reached the limits of sprawl however though, we need a plan for densification and public transport. Idea of modern terrace housing around light rail and heavy rail is a good suggestion that the NSW government has already made. And Melbourne is about to dramatically enlarge it's CBD.
 

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^^ Agree. I think there's real opportunity in our 100k+ cities.

I'd love to see them designed around good PT to try to keep their compact size.

Good public transport near the city centres might discourage sprawl.
I can't agree more with the bolded statement. Seriously no other small cities in Australia (Darwin & Townsville) have more ability to become Australia's next million+ cities alongside other capitals. Unfortunatelly both Darwin & Townsville seem to be sprawling more than any other. Seriously those places have so much potential if managed correctly. We are living in the green age, those cities have the ability to be prepared.
 

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Look Batman and Fawkner quit the arguments OK....this place for a village has to fit over 4 million people around the first decade of the 21st century !

Yeah right ! Take one day at a time........cut that tree down and drag that timber and nails off the deck of the boat on the river and get to work !
 

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So glad somebody created this thread. I was thinking the other day how Australia has a lack of real mid sized cities around the one million mark like the ones you see in the US. Charleston, Rochester, Pittsburgh, Raleigh and Providence spring to mind as mid sized cities which should be replicated in Australia.

Australia's equivalents should be Newcastle,Wollongong, Canberra, Goldy, Townsville, Darwin, Geelong and Albany. There is plenty of scope for Australia to expand well past the 35 million mark if managed correctly. Funnily enough there is a similar thread in the North American forums. "Cities you want to grow and cities you want to slow."
 

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I personally feel that while we have a lot of potential in our regional cities, it will require a lot of gut and strength put into it to get it to work, especially using the data from the previous effort of turning Albury and Wodonga into an alternative inland city which had mixed results (some even call it a failure).

I do hope that the new approach into expanding our regional cities involve more than just rezoning existing farmland into residential areas and focus heavily on providing incentives to start up business in regional cities (which isn't a bad thing itself, but could be worked on). Hopefully the future diversification projects target their focus on making sure that the cities are well connected (transport options such as direct rail links to nearby potential clients, reserved high speed rail corridors for future connections to the major cities, digital communications, etc) to other existing primary service cities so that it isn't considered a sacrifice for potential business investors if they were to relocate.

(Of course, this is only one part of growing a city, but something that I feel that is lacking)
 

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Encourage immigration to regional cities. I have always thought that an incentive, for example, 5 bonus points in the immigration test if the immigrants are willing to settle in selected regional cities.

I would also like to see Port Hedland and Karratha grow to have at least 100,000 people each. Given their locations (proximity to Asia) and the mining boom, they would be ideal locations for new cities.
 

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The idea of target based incentives sounds good on paper.

Unfortunately, i can't see any government being involved with it. They tend to like spending money in the areas that will get them the most votes. What is best for the cities and the people within them is secondary to that.

In any case, outside intervention tends not to work anyway. Another forumer spoke of Albury as an example earlier in this thread. Evocities seems to have been a bit of a flop as well.

At the end of the day, it's down to each city to increase the standards of services and culture in a city which would compell people to move there. Sometimes this takes a lot of political courage and financial investment.
 

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Yeah, but what are these people in all these regional cities going to do for income ?

The idea that there are no jobs in regional cities is a myth.

Yes, It can be hard in smaller regional towns, but you have just as much chance of finding satisfying work and even a career in a larger regional city (say 100,000+) as you would in a captial.
 

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L like the idea of regional cities growing and taking more population from the big cities. But unless there are booms like the mining towns would large increase of population also attract jobs ? I know population gives growth to jobs from more people needing more of everything so hope your right. It would be great if it works.
 
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I think that most of these 6 million should go into enlarging Sydney and Melbourne. Putting all our eggs in our best baskets. Making them bigger and more significant international cities.
They have both almost reached the limits of sprawl however though, we need a plan for densification and public transport. Idea of modern terrace housing around light rail and heavy rail is a good suggestion that the NSW government has already made. And Melbourne is about to dramatically enlarge it's CBD.
Hmmm have you considered not everyone wants to live in that grot hole Sydney. As for Melbourne it will always pay second fiddle as Brisbane will to both of them.

This is not a good idea; we should be spreading out not concentrating on 3 east coast cities turning them into ghettos.

It's simply a culture war between originally the two, now the three cities dating back to the 60's when dead people used to carry on who was best. I've been criticised for bringing this up, fine, but many of the threads in the Australian topics are full of the three cities, with often the others joining in. claiming one is better over the other. As for international, Sydney is not even half of London or New York. No to just pouring money into one city at the expense of others.

Your idea is wrong Mornb and I pray it never happens.
 

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^^
You have such a chip on your shoulder when it comes to Sydney.

It's a grot hole, it's trains are packed at 2pm, the food at The Star is crap etc.

Yet you constantly express your desire for more Sydney brands to open stores in Brisbane and praise Brisbane's food scene because of the Sydney imports.
 

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Glad to see we are having this debate again and let's hope it doesn't flop like it did post Whitlam.

The real question is why aren't Darwin and Townsville etc aren't reaching a million already?

It's all well and good for the majority of us in the Big Three to talk about the benefits of enlarging the second tier cities - but who among us would move there?

Having a 15 min walk to 85% of the things I require daily , I'd find it difficult to give that up as it's something that, at present, very few communities in Australia offer.
 
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