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Can't believe there isnt a thread on this already, but i thought i'd post it considering that it has made the front page of all national newspapers today. I think its worth posting it on this site aswell considering it is classed as a "business venture" in Manchester.


NEW Manchester City owner Thaksin Shinawatra has promised fans the club is safe in his hands - and vowed to bring back the glory days.

The Thai billionaire sent a personal message to Blues supporters in an interview with the M.E.N.

Shinawatra said he has the long-term commitment - and the funds - to make City a major force in football once again.

He said: "I have heard a lot about the club and that it is a very long- established club with a good history and what English people call 'a sleeping giant'.

"I want to make the giant wake up from its sleep."

Shinawatra is facing a corruption probe and allegations of human rights abuse in his home country. As prime minister he initiated a war on drugs in Thailand in which 2,500 people died.

But he insists he is innocent of charges laid against him by political opponents among Thailand's current military leadership and is confident he will eventually be cleared.

He also assured fans the seizure of £1bn of his assets in Thailand will not affect his takeover or his investment in new players. He said: "Don't worry, the money that we plan to use to work with Manchester City I got permission to bring from Thailand a long time ago.

"Bringing that money out of Thailand had been planned several months before this thing happened. In addition, I have friends all over the world I can ask for credit from until I get the justice system to unfreeze my money."

He added: "The club's lease on the City of Manchester Stadium is 250 years. I said I will do the contract extension myself in the next life!"

Shinawatra, 57, a former policeman who made his fortune in telecommunications, became the first foreign owner in City's 127-year history as he completed a £82m takeover yesterday. He was prime minister of Thailand for five years before he was overthrown in a bloodless military coup last September and has since been living in exile in London.

One of his first tasks at City will be to find a new manager. He confirmed that he and his advisers have been in talks with former England coach Sven-Goran Eriksson but that no final decision has been reached. But while City fans were relieved the club will now be able to move on after weeks of delay in takeover talks, many remain concerned that the new owner's troubles in his home country may disrupt the club.

Shinawatra said: "Please tell the fans that the events in Thailand are not happening in a democratic way. I was a democratically-elected leader ousted by a military dictator. Now everything in Thailand is under a military dictatorship.

"It will be back to normal when democracy returns to Thailand in December. I hope that justice will prevail after that. But everything they do is politically-motivated.

"The money I have is money that the whole family earned over more than 20 years by working hard. They said that I have made that money through corruption. That is ridiculous."

Shinawatra also defended himself against claims of human rights abuse by Amnesty International over the high number of deaths that resulted from his hard-line anti-drug policy in Thailand.

He said: "I have explained this several times. The policy was clear. We had to get tough, but within the law.

"If you can find drugs in Bangkok as easily as chewing gum or cigarettes, that is not good for the young generation.

"Before I came in, there were about one million people using drugs, and 300,000 addicts. So I cleaned it up by using tough enforcement of the law. I didn't just sit idly and let them sell drugs. And the police got tough. It was tough but under the rule of law."

Shinawatra will install his 27-year-old son Panthongtae and daughter Pintongta as City directors, but has asked three current directors - chairman John Wardle, chief executive Alistair Mackintosh and Bryan Bodek - to stay on the board.

He added: "I believe the continuity that brings is very important to the long-term future of the club. When I run a business, I make sure there are professionals in place to do the job professionally, and that is what I have done here."

Shinawatra is expected to spend up to £50m on new players. He added: "If necessary it may cost £50m, it may cost £30m or it may cost £20m. I will leave recruitment to my advisers, but I know we need two strikers, two midfielders and maybe some others. I will bring some equity and capital to the club so they can invest more on players and other infrastructure if this is necessary.

"The existing players are very good but we have to bring more good players to the club.

"When you want effectiveness you drive for the target and that is my style - strong leadership, not dictatorship."



 

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I love those crazy dutch
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A filthy-rich saviour for long-suffering City? Grow up

David Conn
Friday June 22, 2007
The Guardian

The timing of yesterday's announcement, that Manchester City's "custodians" are to sell the club to Thaksin Shinawatra and bank millions of pounds of his money on the same day he was charged with criminal corruption in his home country, served to underline Thaksin's advisers' view all along: the fans won't protest.

City's discussions with the former Thai prime minister, who was deposed in a military coup after widespread allegations of corruption and family nest-feathering, have been conducted with the assumption that the club's supporters will not be worried about how Thaksin made his billions, or troubled by the long-standing allegations of human rights violations. They would just want somebody, anybody, to throw money in to buy City a few players "fit to wear the shirt".

Sadly, that seems to be mostly true. A few City fans have read up on Thaksin and decided they would be ashamed if he becomes the owner and chairman of Manchester's self-styled community club - but most want to know only if the former England coach Sven-Goran Eriksson will be the manager and whether Thaksin will provide enough money to enable City to compete with United in next season's derby.

I was a fan like them back in 1994, standing at Maine Road to welcome a previous saviour, Francis Lee, as the new majority owner to replace Peter Swales. Who knew anything then about money in football, or shareholdings in clubs, or the debts in the accounts? Swales, a vinegary old salt, was finally out and blessed, cherubic Franny, centre-forward from the glory days, was in. "St Francis, the Second Coming", proclaimed the T-shirts.

I interviewed Franny shortly after his takeover and there, in the chairman's office at Maine Road, began my education into the football business - or more precisely into the yawning, at times tragic, chasm between the sentimental, lifelong loyalty fans have for their clubs and the games money men play with them. As an eight-year-old, I kissed Franny's image on television after watching him score a wondrous free-kick in the sunshine. As an adult, I met a businessman. He was planning to make money out of City by redeveloping the Kippax Street Stand, scooping up the Sky TV millions, then floating the club on the Stock Exchange.

I went on my own journey, learning some facts I should have known already: about how the Football Association from the beginning of professional football believed it must preserve the game's sporting soul and introduced astute rules to protect clubs from being financially exploited; then how, when modern clubs floated on the stock market, our toothless FA allowed them to bypass those rules by forming holding companies; that the Premier League was formed in 1992 by 22 First Division clubs, including City, to break away from the Football League's practice of sharing TV money with the 70 in the three lower divisions. Football, contrary to the instinctive feeling of those who love the game and against its own traditions, had become a financial free for all.

City being City, Franny cocked it up. The club was bailed out by John Wardle and David Makin, who might have steered City into a golden age but blew it, too. Now they are accepting £17.5m in part payment of their loans and £7.2m for their shares from Thaksin, who is charged with corruption, has much of his assets frozen and who will use City as part of his profile-boosting campaign in Thailand. There the rural poor, among whom he remains popular, are part of the global TV audience dazzled by the Premiership.

Yesterday's announcement expressed nothing about City being the Manchester club, about pride or heart, nor anything about Thaksin's criminal charges or the cloud hanging over him. Instead City's board said: "The offer presents an opportunity for Manchester City shareholders to realise their entire shareholding in Manchester City for cash, at a significant premium."

Which says it all. Many City fans were rejoicing yesterday as if the club had found another saviour, not caring, as predicted, about Thaksin's background; wanting only his money. Really, City fans, those who are not eight years old any more, should grow up.

Ownership changes

• Feb 5 1994 Francis Lee is appointed chairman after paying £3m for 112,337 shares from Peter Swales and Stephen Boler at £13.35 per share. "Trust me," said Lee, with City in the relegation zone. "I'm sure the fans will help us to get back on top." He resigned in March 1998 and was replaced by David Bernstein

• May 19 2003 John Wardle, the founder of JD Sports and now the largest shareholder with his business partner David Makin, becomes chairman. In 2001 the pair had raised their stake to 29.95%

• June 21 2007 Former Thai prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra lodges a formal takeover bid of £81.6m and the board recommends shareholders accept it. Offers Wardle and Makin £7.2m for their shares and £17.5m for the £20m they are owed in loans. Thaksin has 55.9% but needs 75% to remove City from the stock market

http://football.guardian.co.uk/News_...108675,00.html
 

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it'll all end in tears :eek:hno: it'll be all rosy for 5 years or so then this guy will go to jail and leave a wage bill the size of J.Lo's arse
 

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All abit sad really

Sad that yet another part of manchester is falling prey to dubious globalisation.

Sad that its rather obvious that the true reason for this is possibly to due with certain sharp business practices and moving money about, than support for either football or that club.

That the city council and all those who have had a fiscal part of building the COM stadium have little leverage on the matter

But most of all is the slavish attitude of blues fans who seem to readily sell out their soul in favour a dodgy deal and the dubious slim chance of success

But maybe I am wrong. Now there is always maine road FC.
 

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You Red b******* are just jealous. :lovethem:

Not much longer to wait now. (thank f***!)

 

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FIT AND PROPER PERSON

James Lawton in the Independent on the laughable Premier League 'test'.

'You might imagine the new chairman of Manchester City is a suitable case for resounding rejection by the quaintly named arm of the Premier League known as the Fit and Proper Persons Test.

'You might think the antecedents of Thaksin Shinawatra would provoke the full majesty of an instrument that sounds as though it was made to sift out candidates who do not perhaps carry all the right credentials for ownership of a club which, for all the despair and the angst it has generated over the years, is still one of the most beloved in the land.

'But then you will probably have to think again. Why? Because Thaksin, the former prime minister of Thailand who has been accused of corruption by the military government that succeeded him and has been regularly in the sights of Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and who has just had more than £1bn frozen in 21 banks, has proved himself eminently capable of command to the hierarchy of City and enough of the club's shareholders.

'The proper person, we know well enough now, can be someone like Thaksin. He has the supreme virtue of carrying more than enough of the folding stuff. It is, apparently, the ultimate requirement in an examination which is not so much a moral probe as a financial checklist. Human rights and business practice are simply not part of the equation. Have you or one of your companies suffered bankruptcy in this country? No, well fine, march on. Give us your huddled masses of money.

'Roll up, roll up, the Premiership will take your money and leave the agonising to more gentle souls, who might just wonder how it was that Abramovich was a man of fabulous wealth in his mid-thirties in a society where professors and eminent doctors can go months without being paid? He won himself so many of the mineral rights of the people who authored the October Revolution.

'Naturally, the selling owner of Chelsea, Ken Bates, didn't thrash out the moral imperatives of the man who was about to pay off the club's debts and so substantially augment his own wealth. Premiership football doesn't work like that. It doesn't worry about the origins of wealth; it just counts the money.

'Inevitably, there now must be a sense of working amorality that is quite stunning. Thaksin may have a dubious past, he may be persona non grata in his own country, but he brings the promise of success, of wealth that will make City contenders again. It is the simplest equation: money makes success, money swamps guilt.

'It takes us to the ultimate question. Will the City fans care how their new wealth and power were gained any more than the denizens of Stamford Bridge when mega-signings like Michael Essien and Didier Drogba put on some unanswerable show of power? Did Pompey supporters fret over the background of their owner when they pushed for the once fantasy ambition of European football?

'There are no prizes for the correct answers to such leading questions. They produce only sighs of recognition that football has rarely had a more poignant example of the degree the game has changed than in the annexation of a club which, even more than the late-charging United, was so rooted in the streets of its city.'
 

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I'm in your woods
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Trouble is, statements of outraged morality from journalists might ring more true if they they themselves hadn't all proven themselves happy to take money from the likes of Robert Maxwell, Rupert Murdoch and Conrad Black.

Having said that, no way should a man in Shinawatra's postition be allowed to gain control of a football club.
 

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As much as I don't think Shinawatra is such a bad egg the consequences of his ownership of City could mean that the club itself has the potential to be seized and owned by the new Thai Government if it rules the money he made from the sale of Shin Corp (which he has used to buy the club) was made through corruption. He does himself no favours living in exile and missing his court date next week (which he claims he will be aquitted from.. but refuses to fly back to attend!).

It's a shame for City and I do want this to work out as it could be so great if things were different, but I can see this latest city-drama ending in tears if not blood!
 

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Naturally Roman the Russian and that nice Ken Bates not to mention the Irish chaps what sold the Reds down the pan are really decent chaps with the clubs fans foremost in their hearts.

I don't think it is City fans need to grow up it's people who apparently think football is "clean".

And I'm not eight sadly not even close to it. :lol:
 

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I love those crazy dutch
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I'm a city fan, but I know only too well how most bitter blues would be reacting if this guy was buying any of the rival clubs. Standing up and welcoming this guy with open arms just because he's paid off a few debts and investing some money in the club is pretty disgusting.
 
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