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10th February 2008
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Housing / Stocks In Manchester

Did somebody ask for such a thread? My mistake.

Anyway.

Didsbury is...... as per-usual.

Manchester Confidential

The Village Of Desire: Didsbury Development Wins

Jill Burdett finds property developer Mike Kennedy has sold all 11 properties on a central Didsbury site




PROPERTY DEVELOPER Mike Kennedy is feeling pretty chuffed right now. He has just sold all 11 properties on a site across from Albert’s Restaurant in Didsbury off-plan, total value around £7m.

They are big, traditional looking family houses, designed by Calderpeel for Mike’s company Hillcrest Homes and all have been bought by people already living locally who knew the location. One person has actually bought two and he says he could have sold the south facing properties at The Square ten times over.

It didn’t need the BBC effect here then.


Some may think them a tad twee with all the detailing but I believe it is this reassuring familiarity which has made them so appealing to buyers. These are comfortable rather than challenging houses

Mike said: “Buyers looked at the prices of second hand homes in the area of a similar size and realised that they could get a modern, energy efficient version with garage and parking for the same money.”

The money needed was, on average, £640,000 for 2,600sq ft of space over three floors. They may have high ceilings and coving and great doors but they are also built to Code 3 levels of energy efficiency with wood burning stoves in the living room and photovoltaic’s on the south facing roofs.

Hillcrest is probably better known for £3-4m mega mansions around Prestbury and Alderley but they have built in Didsbury before, namely the apartment block called Avenir on School Lane which is all white render and glass.



But on the former synagogue site the brief was for something that much more traditional looking, something that met the brief of the ‘perfect’ Didsbury house and fitted with surrounded streets rather than being startlingly different.

Some may think them a tad twee with all the detailing but I believe it is this reassuring familiarity which has made them so appealing to buyers. These are comfortable rather than challenging houses.

And they also provide what is currently deemed the ideal family layout with a big glossy dining kitchen that has folding doors onto the back garden and direct access to a family room.

The separate grown-up living room is at the front and there’s a large downstairs cloaks and a utility as well as a room that could be either study or dining room.

Three bedrooms on the first floor including the master with en-suite and dressing room and two more en-suite bedrooms on the second floor.

They inevitably are top heavy with more bedroom space than living but as most teens live in their rooms it makes sense to have them at the top of the house.

They are arranged in a square hence the name and the road outside has been finished well with cobbles and kerbing – no black tarmac here.

Since they have all sold Hillcrest have not needed to kit out a show home but they could not resist having a bit of an open day for everyone involved in the development plus dozens of others including rival developers.

The general reaction was that they have done a great job here, the level of fittings and the finish is impressive and while they have managed to fit a lot of houses onto the site, including an extra ‘stable house’ at the back it does not feel crammed.

Nick Brimelow from the agents JP Brimelow, said: “A combination of things meant this development sold beyond even our expectations.

“There has not been a development like this, providing this level of accommodation for some time and that scarcity valued coupled with the fact that the pricing was spot-on meant they went within weeks.

“I think they would all have still sold had they been a modern, rather than period design but personally I am very glad that they managed to retain the look and I think it enhances the whole area.

“Didsbury is not immune from the current economic difficulties but what this site has shown is that if the product and prices are right then they will sell.

“I think we have ridden the storm but prices will stay static for the rest of the year and what we are actually short of are good family houses coming to the market to encourage some movement.”
On the other side of the coin.

LEVE. And my misspent Youth.

I'm sorry for nicking the odd chew bar Mr Morley.



The said site has been like this for decades. Change is finally on the way.

Manchester Confiential.

A SIZEABLE housing development has been given the go-ahead in Levenshulme despite some strong opposition from locals.

Manchester City Council granted permission for 150 new homes - 109 flats and 37 houses - on a site next to St Mary’s Church on Elbow Street.

New shops and an underground car park will also be built by the Irish based developer.

It’s the fourth time the scheme has come before planners but objectors say it is still overdevelopment of the site and the amount of new cars generated will increase traffic chaos in the area.

Others believe the derelict site needed tackling and the crucial thing now will be on the design detail to make sure the end result is as good as it can be.
Will the Heaton Moor shoe boxes tempt me from Cheadle Heath? Perhaps the question should be, can I afford one?


Manchester Confidential.

The same probably applies to a 10 acre site in Heaton Moor which has just got permission for 210 new homes.

The land is owned by Stockport College which has been looking at its options since it lost Government funding for a new building.

Selling off sites for development is one way to raise reserves and as well as this one it plans to dispose of six more in Stockport and one in Wigan.

Stockport Council granted outline approval on condition that 20-25% of homes will be affordable housing and the developer provides replacement sports pitches and changing facilities.

Expect a bit of a rush from developers keen to build in this popular suburb.

There may be less of an appetite to develop a 47 acre brownfield site in Newton Heath where an application has gone in to Manchester planners to build 400 homes alongside new office/light industrial space.

Architects Taylor Young have designed the scheme for the former Jacksons Brickworks site on Ten Acres Lane and say it will contribute to the regeneration of the wider area.

As well as new homes and new workspaces there will cycle routes and walkways on the land that borders the Rochdale Canal.
 

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Manchester's stocks were occasionally put up in the market place so that petty criminals might "endure not only the jeers and laughter of the bystanders, or their angry revilings, but the more substantial, painful, and ignominious degradation of being pelted with decayed fruit, rotten eggs, fragments of cabbages, stinking fish, and other disagreeable missiles"



Sorry jrb, couldn't help myself.
 

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Might as well share my story of the booming Greater Manchester property market from my family's perspective.

My uncle has a large house with a large garden in Worsley and he recently built 2 new houses on his back yard and converted a floor of his home into a flat. He put them all on the market just before Christmas and has just sold the flat last week! Yay..
 

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Housebuilders build what focus groups tell them to. Unfortunately, the kind of people interviewed in those focus groups and market research have a disorted view of what they *actually* want.

It is like everyone accepts 'car' culture as it is seen as 'normal'.

Newbuilds do not have enough storage, nor parking (both bicycle and car). Open-plan creates the illusion of space that isn't there.

My old (Manchester) townhouse style (furthest left):



My new (Milton Keynes) townhouse style:

 

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Yes but the lack of storage space is not something the customer asks for, its where the developer saves money.
False economy when they can't sell stock no-one 'wants'. May have worked in the boom times, when sheeple couldn't wait to rush to the ladder/snake.

Thanks Meadows. I really liked the white render and zinc walls/roof, as well as the natural wood touches. If I could have moved it with me, I would have done! What the picture doesn't show is the local dereliction, lack of facilities, flytipping.....which is what brought the development down.
 

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link_road_17/7 said:
Housebuilders build what focus groups tell them to. Unfortunately, the kind of people interviewed in those focus groups and market research have a disorted view of what they *actually* want.

It is like everyone accepts 'car' culture as it is seen as 'normal'.

Newbuilds do not have enough storage, nor parking (both bicycle and car). Open-plan creates the illusion of space that isn't there.

My old (Manchester) townhouse style (furthest left):

My new (Milton Keynes) townhouse style:
"if I asked people what they want they'd have asked for a faster horse" Henry Ford.

I think Steve Jobs and Jonathan Ive had a similar philosophy.

Shame Barratts and their ilk don't

Open plan with lots of storage and utility rooms - that's the way forward my friends. Gives the illusion of space with the storage space in the same space as lots of pokey rooms. But we're stupid, we buy houses on how many rooms they have. :nuts:
 

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People don't complain about Vincent Harris' neoclassical Central Library yet it was designed 313 years after Indigo Jone's Queens House in Greenwich was completed. I don't understand the logic in this argument.

The problem with barratt-style homes isn't what they look like its the urban design and the fact that they are so small.
 

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worse than small rooms is the fact there is NO external space either - this is simply a result of builders shooting for as much profit as possible...
 

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