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All local authorities have to do spatial planning policies, setting out what they would like to see built where so developers know what might or might not get planning permission and how much housing and office space is predicted to be required.
 

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Would be amazing if manchester had another proposed skyscraper and even better if was bigger than the beetham tower. Unlikly to happen though :lol:
 

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Question for the forum experts on local government planning documents, strategies and bureaucracy. Apologies - this post have nothing to do with skyscrapers.

Just scanned the document paying particular attention to the transport chapter. For a while now I've had this memory from the TIF days rattling around the back of my mind. At the time there was an a proposal to 'downgrade' the Mancunian Way, removing the central reservation, reducing the speed limit to 30mph and adding a new westbound lane.

This struck me as a great idea from a capacity, safety and 'sightseeing' point of view. Capacity in particular will become an issue over the next couple of decades if the envisaged economic growth materialises. But I note the proposal does not feature in this new document. Does that mean our city fathers have officially dropped this aspiration until at least 2027, or would it more properly belong in some other regional roads/transport strategy document?

I know funding is not in place or on the horizon for such a scheme at the moment, but unless its on somebody's radar somewhere as a future aspiration it will never happen. TIF gave Manchester a pipeline of well developed business cases for infrastructure investment, some of which have since found funding. I firmly believe that the city would not had funding/investment it has seen over the last couple of years had it not been for the TIF process.

So while it may feel unaffordable today, I cant help but feel schemes like the Mancunian Way should still be alive in these strategy documents. I mean who knows when the next round of funding looking for shovel ready schemes to invest in will rear its head. And if there is no proposal in our strategy, we would never win my hypothetical funding.
 

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Chris W
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Any chance of Mr Rip or the Mods changing the thread title to something like Manchester's Development Strategy 2012-2027?

It's something that deserves its own thread on here.

Cheers
CW
 

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10th February 2008
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Any chance of Mr Rip or the Mods changing the thread title to something like Manchester's Development Strategy 2012-2027?

It's something that deserves its own thread on here.

Cheers
CW
PM B4mmy. He will do it straightaway.
 

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The doc is referred to as a masterplan, so have come up with a hybrid title...
 

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Less is more.
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I'm surprised you've got time with all the luuuurve your making atm b4mmy :runaway:
 

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It's not a masterplan, its a planning policy document. This is a thread and a subject whose time has come and gone already as the consultation on the Core Strategy is now largely complete.

Another example of the MEN's ever deteriorating standards and ever increasing irrelevance.
 

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It was adopted on the 11th July so its now the final plan, that makes it newsworthy though they have taken a week to report it.
 

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It was adopted on the 11th July so its now the final plan, that makes it newsworthy though they have taken a week to report it.
Not yet, it's June. :)

I read a book on the rebuilding of Manchester following the 1996 bomb. If I remember from the author's statements (who was a city planner himself), the masterplan and core strategy had a planned time frame of around 15 years after the bomb. As Leese said about the Cathedral Quarter redevelopment earlier this year, it is generally the last piece of jigsaw following the bomb. I'm assuming this revised core strategy is a continuation of the foundations that were laid out in 96.
 

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10th February 2008
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Place North West.

Retail injection for city centre

25 Jun 2012, 11:07


Around 800,000 sq ft of new city centre retail and more tall buildings are among proposals in Manchester's core strategy, due to be adopted in the coming weeks.

The planning blueprint for the next 15 years is aimed, the council said, at 'cementing Manchester as one of the world's leading cities.'

The plan inevitably confirms the role of Eastlands, Central Park and Airport City as vital to economic development.

The council said: "A focus for visitors, the city centre will expand its commercial strengths through around 75,000 sq m of new retail space, incorporating a variety of high-quality accommodation types and sizes, for mixed retail, leisure, entertainment and tourism use."

There is also scope for 'a future of tall buildings that contribute positively to the city centre and that add to the distinctive character of the Manchester skyline'.

Commercial development is planned for fringe areas around the core such as Hulme and Ancoats, Castlefield, the Oxford Road Corridor and Piccadilly.

Sir Richard Leese, leader of Manchester City Council, said: "Manchester has not been immune from the effects of the recession and investment in the city is vital to make sure our growing number of residents continue to enjoy an improving quality of life. Each aspect of this strategy allows us to look ahead and plan how the city will continue to thrive in the coming years."

In the residential sector, the city centre and its environs to the north and east will be the focus for new home building, with an estimated 60,000 new homes scheduled to be built over the next 15 years.

Leese added: "We want to encourage a shift back to old fashioned neighbourhoods where entire families can live their lives. The key is sustainability - making sure that each area fully caters for the needs of residents and that affordable housing is available, so that people in different circumstances can all find a home."

Visit the core strategy section of council website for more details
http://www.manchester.gov.uk/info/856/local_development_framework/3301/core_strategy
 

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Resident Ignoramus
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It was adopted on the 11th July so its now the final plan, that makes it newsworthy though they have taken a week to report it.
It was adopted by the council, but all Core Strategies then have to go to the Government Planning Insepector for Examination in Public (EiP).

(I've been involved in our local CS and EiP here in Bristol - it's reeeeally long-winded!)
 
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