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This could be useful to people looking to move to L.A. It's a website that shows you the median income for every neighborhood in America. All you do is type in the address and it finds your location. It's really helpful!

The website is RichBlocksPoorBlocks.com

Here's an example pic: it's a part of Los Angeles.


It's crazy the income disparity between South-Central and West L.A., but at least it's easy to spot the areas to avoid -- then again, there may be other factors to crime than just income.

So, how's your neck of the metropolis?
 

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Silver Lake
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Is this mapping income or crime? The two are not synonymous. Interesting though, I live in Silver Lake surrounded by near million dollar homes and my block is in pale red.
 

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What's going on in your neck of the woods ? Heck, years ago the older inner suburbs were where poorer people lived and looked on as ghettos ( a US term I think ) for lesser or ethnic culture areas. Now after years of 'gentrification' all these working class or older areas near the Downtown are the most expensive places for real estate ! Young couples, singles, University students, older couples that have retired and want a smaller apartment or or business people thrive in the inner areas, even larger luxury homes on big blocks of land.....in Melbourne anyway. I know this must happen in LA eventually. Think about it.......So much prime land so close to everything..hmm then maybe your central city doesn't offer the living city like mine. I love LA but seems like lots of office buildings and hotels.....what will be will be but think ahead....Every city has it's own personality but you need a living central city 24 hours a day and life around it nearby follows.
 

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cool map , just because an area is very low income , it does not mean it is automatically a crime infested area
 

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Silver Lake
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It captures the basin section of the city. The Valley will be alot of red and the port too.
 

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Nice map. I think we all know that DT and South Central are poor and some other areas are rich. Same pattern in most cities (LES and UES in NY; Pacific Heights and Bayview).

PI: socioeconomic segregation is not normal? Ever hear of the wrong side of the tracks? Uptown vs. downtown? In Spanish countries it's Barrios Bajos and every city has them. Marx and Engles critiqued the ones in London and Manchester nearly 200 years ago. It's not only normal it's quite common from ancient times forward. And existed way before cars did.
 

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Nice map. I think we all know that DT and South Central are poor and some other areas are rich. Same pattern in most cities (LES and UES in NY; Pacific Heights and Bayview).

PI: socioeconomic segregation is not normal? Ever hear of the wrong side of the tracks? Uptown vs. downtown? In Spanish countries it's Barrios Bajos and every city has them. Marx and Engles critiqued the ones in London and Manchester nearly 200 years ago. It's not only normal it's quite common from ancient times forward. And existed way before cars did.
Socioeconomic segregation in this way....

You have to read more carefully.
 

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Incidentally, well-designed cities do not create segregation. They avoid having any community barriers or concentrated pollution. They provide for environmental justice. They promote a diversity of housing types with a variety of sizes and features. And, these places create unique neighborhoods and districts that are all equally appealing, although, oftentimes, for different reasons.

Societies throughout time have always been able to integrate by income, but that fact does not mean that segregation has not occurred due to design factors or ethnic prejudices. And, certainly, land values would never be as disparate as automobile-dependent suburban sprawl has made them.

Freeways are slum machines. They result in the loss of wilderness and countryside and in widespread urban disinvestment.
 

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Silver Lake
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Even with all of my fury for freeways I wouldn't quite go that far "prag". There are positives to freeways/highways/expressways or let's just say anything that was built under the Eisenhower initiative. Movement of goods is really the only thing that I will mention because that alone was revolutionary for our local ports and our economy. But yes, intercity freeways have done alot of damage to the environment and socioeconomic environment respectively.

The statement about "well-designed" cities and what they do and don't do would disqualify every major US city, sadly.
 

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Even with all of my fury for freeways I wouldn't quite go that far "prag". There are positives to freeways/highways/expressways or let's just say anything that was built under the Eisenhower initiative. Movement of goods is really the only thing that I will mention because that alone was revolutionary for our local ports and our economy. But yes, intercity freeways have done alot of damage to the environment and socioeconomic environment respectively.

The statement about "well-designed" cities and what they do and don't do would disqualify every major US city, sadly.
The question one should ask is whether or not freeways/highways/expressways are inherently superior to fixed guideways for the movement of goods and/or people since both kinds of infrastructure were and are available. Many of the positives that come from grade-separated highways can be achieved through fixed guideways.

Moreover, these car-dependent systems are especially pernicious when they cut through urban and suburban areas and when the thoroughfares are made freely-available to users.

Our existing highway system needs retrofitting so that the portions through the urbanized areas are converted to calmer boulevards and so that new tolling is combined with the addition of both freeway-running express buses and clean-energy cargo trucks.
 

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Silver Lake
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I completely agree with the last two paragraphs but the relationship between highways and goods movement in regards to using fixed guideways or rail is one of flexibility. And also one of the primary reasons given for building them, troop movement.
 

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Incidentally, well-designed cities do not create segregation. They avoid having any community barriers or concentrated pollution. They provide for environmental justice. They promote a diversity of housing types with a variety of sizes and features. And, these places create unique neighborhoods and districts that are all equally appealing, although, oftentimes, for different reasons.

Societies throughout time have always been able to integrate by income, but that fact does not mean that segregation has not occurred due to design factors or ethnic prejudices. And, certainly, land values would never be as disparate as automobile-dependent suburban sprawl has made them.

Freeways are slum machines. They result in the loss of wilderness and countryside and in widespread urban disinvestment.
What silliness.

Again, slums constituted about 90 percent of London or Paris or other major citeis before the car existed. Ownership of a horse provided an escape from the inner city. Then carriages and decent rodad provide escape and the ability to live outside the slums. Then rail provided the escape. The effects in NY and other large cities are well documented: the suburbs became a place where inner city people could live. Some nice suburbs, some bad; most in-between. Then came the car much later.
 

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What silliness.

Again, slums constituted about 90 percent of London or Paris or other major citeis before the car existed. Ownership of a horse provided an escape from the inner city. Then carriages and decent rodad provide escape and the ability to live outside the slums. Then rail provided the escape. The effects in NY and other large cities are well documented: the suburbs became a place where inner city people could live. Some nice suburbs, some bad; most in-between. Then came the car much later.
The only silliness is looking at southern California and not realizing that something is seriously wrong.

Had the trolley system remained in place and had the rail system been upgraded in the 1960's when the Shinkansen was being built, we'd all be living in a much better place where reinvestment in older communities is the norm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTTF2QIHDCM
 

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The only silliness is looking at southern California and not realizing that something is seriously wrong.

Had the trolley system remained in place and had the rail system been upgraded in the 1960's when the Shinkansen was being built, we'd all be living in a much better place where reinvestment in older communities is the norm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTTF2QIHDCM
That would not have stopped most of the freeways from being built given that the explosive growth of the area came regardless of the existing infrastructure that was there. The freeways did not cause all that growth: it was the defense industry and the boom in port traffic. LA was already a car town even when the red cars were at the peak of their operation: there's a reason LA's boulevards even in the urban parts of the city are 4 and 6 lanes wide, vs 2 or 4 lanes in cities like Chicago.
 

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Silver Lake
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That would not have stopped most of the freeways from being built given that the explosive growth of the area came regardless of the existing infrastructure that was there. The freeways did not cause all that growth: it was the defense industry and the boom in port traffic. LA was already a car town even when the red cars were at the peak of their operation: there's a reason LA's boulevards even in the urban parts of the city are 4 and 6 lanes wide, vs 2 or 4 lanes in cities like Chicago.
Yes, the freeways would have still been built I agree. But LA as a car city was really the reflection of the entire country. I mean, Henry Ford didn't just sell cars in Southern California did he? Most burgeoning US cities at the turn of the 20th century had less of a rail network than LA by far and were also "car cities". LA was much more of a mass transit city than say Houston, Detroit, Cleveland who all had a network but none that rivaled LA's. Also LA's boulevards are wide as a result of ironically the streetcar. Streetcars would run down the center of our most used boulevards along with car traffic. When the streetcar was extracted from the center of the street many times a median or another car lane was added. LA's history may seem lamentable by some but really it's a history of a city that adapted quickly, grew and succeeded. In that process every city makes what is seen in hindsight as mistakes. But we don't live in hindsight, we live in the now. Every major city was adding "parkways" to their infrastructure, NYC under Robert Moses was going hogwild at the time clear up until the '60's, Chicago as well. Unlike the formerly mentioned cities, unfortunately LA hadn't grade separated its rail. When it comes to LA it's always much more nuanced than what it seems.
 

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Silver Lake
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The only silliness is looking at southern California and not realizing that something is seriously wrong.

Had the trolley system remained in place and had the rail system been upgraded in the 1960's when the Shinkansen was being built, we'd all be living in a much better place where reinvestment in older communities is the norm.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTTF2QIHDCM
Cars were par the course in US history. Because of the ethos of the nation, the Jeffersonian ideology that leaned libertarian, it was as if the car met the US and the US met the car; and the rest was history. Perhaps if any of the World Wars were actually fought stateside inwhich our cities were destroyed as in Europe and had to be basically rebuilt we'd have a different view of how to live.
Southern Cali is one of the largest, affluent and economically viable regions in the world. The LA CSA's GDP is always in the top ten usually ranking 3 or 4. So let's not get hysterical. And regarding your older communities concern, I live in Silver Lake a first ring suburban neighborhood where the house that I live in will turn 100 next year. This neighborhood along with its other slightly younger but still old compatriots all are averaging $600,000-800,000 in home sales(during the boom)double the Los Angeles area single family home average. So I'm not sure if we should be shedding tears over So Cal.
 
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