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Baltimore/DC Corridorite
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I guess the split is the eastern/western half. around I95? is all of balt humid subtropical or is some of it in between piedmont and humid subtropical? which do you prefer?
 

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I guess the split is the eastern/western half. around I95? is all of balt humid subtropical or is some of it in between piedmont and humid subtropical? which do you prefer?
I-95 (and east) plus the perimeters of Baltimore and DC are in the "Humid Subtropical" zone, although it doesn't feel all that subtropical in winter. There is another big break in climate (much bigger than the eastern one) out in western MD. When you go up 2500 feet from Cumberland to Grantsville, McHenry, etc., the climate shifts very sharply. I have seen snow in Garrett County in May and early October when it was mild in Baltimore and the all time cold record for Oakland is 40-freakin degress below zero. It can make you think you took a wrong turn and ended up in Maine.
 

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I-95 (and east) plus the perimeters of Baltimore and DC are in the "Humid Subtropical" zone, although it doesn't feel all that subtropical in winter. There is another big break in climate (much bigger than the eastern one) out in western MD. When you go up 2500 feet from Cumberland to Grantsville, McHenry, etc., the climate shifts very sharply. I have seen snow in Garrett County in May and early October when it was mild in Baltimore and the all time cold record for Oakland is 40-freakin degress below zero. It can make you think you took a wrong turn and ended up in Maine.
Here's an average snowfall map...



The climate across MD/DC/NoVA isn't really that different until you get into the winter, although the mountains are obviously colder all year round & can see snow from October into May on rare occasions (although there has been snow recorded in May in DC/Baltimore as well... only once or twice, though). 100° heat doesn't discriminate between the piedmont or coast, but the elevation and position further west of the piedmont makes a major difference during winter which is why the snowfall gradient is somewhat steep.
 

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Here's an average snowfall map...



The climate across MD/DC/NoVA isn't really that different until you get into the winter, although the mountains are obviously colder all year round & can see snow from October into May on rare occasions (although there has been snow recorded in May in DC/Baltimore as well... only once or twice, though). 100° heat doesn't discriminate between the piedmont or coast, but the elevation and position further west of the piedmont makes a major difference during winter which is why the snowfall gradient is somewhat steep.
That's pretty much illustrative of what I said. Notice that from the lower Eastern Shore snowfalls range from the teens near OC to the 30's in the mountains east of the Allegany Plateau, but once you go up that big hill, it's up to 90 - 100. Distance from water and elevation make the difference and Garrett County really is the Siberia of Maryland.
 
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