SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 655 Posts

·
Transport Advocate
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
final tender for smartcard in melbourne

http://www.doi.vic.gov.au/doi/doielect.nsf/2a6bd98dee287482ca256915001cff0c/d1b2c84c38f22dceca25702a00223ed0/$FILE/TTA_MediaRelease170305.pdf

There is a short list of 2 consortiums.

One of which is "Keane", the latter being "Manta. T". "Manta. T " is backed by MTR Corporation with huge experience in smartcard technology through being the major shareholder of Octopus smartcards.

PDF release dated 17th March 2005
 

·
Transport Advocate
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
smartcard fare payment for Melbourne

Source: http://myki.com.au/latest-news_detail.aspx?view=1

Minister for Transport unveils future of Victoria's public transport.
07.09.2006
THE KEY TO DISCOVERING VICTORIA’S NEW PUBLIC TRANSPORT TICKETING SYSTEM


Victorians had a glimpse into the future with the unveiling of the new look public transport ticketing system today.

Transport Minister Peter Batchelor said the smartcard-based ticketing system, which will be rolled out across Victoria next year, will be named myki - pronounced “my key”.

“myki will open the door to a new era in public transport – giving Victorians a world-class ticketing system.

“myki will provide access to a wide range of public transport services across the State. Passengers will simply scan their myki cards across an electronic reader as they get on and off the train, tram or bus,” Mr Batchelor said.

“myki will then calculate the best fare for the journey, and deduct that amount from the money stored on the card.

“It’s a simple, easy way to travel.”

Mr Batchelor said similar smartcard ticketing systems were already in place and working successfully in a number of major global cities, such as Hong Kong, London, Taipei and Singapore.

“Victoria’s myki system is being designed around the needs of public transport customers – it will be their key to travelling around Victoria.

“The smartcards will be the same size as a credit card and made of durable plastic – a perfect fit for your wallet or purse,” he said.

“myki will be flexible and secure – allowing passengers to change their travel plans during the day while still getting the benefits of the best possible fare.”

Mr Batchelor also unveiled a mobile discovery centre that will enable staff of Victoria’s train, tram and bus operators to get first-hand experience of the new system.

“The myki discovery centre contains all the equipment customers will use such as scanners, machines for putting cash onto the cards, and readers for seeing how much value you have left on your myki card.”

Mr Batchelor said public transport staff would be the first to try out the new technology.

“Staff are on the front-line dealing with customers all day - and they will be absolutely vital during the transition period when people are getting used to the new technology.

“We feel it is important to get staff feedback on how it will work in the field.”

Mr Batchelor said the myki discovery centre will make its first public appearance at the Royal Melbourne Show.

“As we get closer to the launch of the new system, the discovery centre will play an important role in customer education,” he said.

“Victorians will see much more of the discovery centre when it hits the road early next year, visiting communities right around the State.”

Mr Batchelor said progress on the development of the supporting software for the ticketing system is tracking well.

The Transport Ticketing Authority, which is developing the smartcard ticketing system in conjunction with contractor Kamco, is on track to commence the roll-out of myki in late 2007, with a pilot planned for next year to thoroughly test the equipment. A program of civil works is set to begin in January 2007 when installation of about 20,000 units of new equipment will begin in trains, trams and buses in suburban Melbourne and major regional towns.

The discovery centre was designed and built in Ballarat by local company Brimarco Industries which specialises in manufacturing purpose-built trailers.

Extensive consultation with disability groups has been an important part of the myki solution design and development, and a hydraulic lift has been installed in the display centre.

For more information on myki contact 131 638 or visit the myki website: www.myki.com.au
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I hope no-one takes the Mickey with this name!

More seriously perhaps, I also hope that the same electronic tickets will be useable in other Australian cities... and even compatible with the DayPass and e-tags used for road pricing in some Australian cities.

Simon
 

·
Transport Advocate
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There is no way for a smartcard to work with the etag system unless the backends are all connected and there is a smartcard to gantry adapter-reader like the mykad system in Malaysia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Brisbane's Smart Card system is being put to use before the year is out, with the trials nearly over.
 

·
Lurker
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
It took a long time before e-tags were able to be used in other cities, so I wouldn't have my hopes up for national integration just yet.

The good thing is that the entire ticketing system is integrated, so there will be only one ticketing system used for metropolitan and regional networks.

This system might even make it cheaper to travel since fares are charged at the current rate for a bulk ticket (ie. daily x5 or 2-hour x10) instead of a single fare.
 

·
Registered Abuser
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
Melbourne's rail system dates from 1854 when the first train line in Australia was opened. Today it encompasses 16 lines of broad gauge track, over 200 stations, and around 330 EMU units.

Melbourne's train system is run by Connex under contract to the Victorian Government, and comprises one of the three major parts of Metlink, Melbourne's public transport organization. Here's a route map from the Metlink website http://www.metlinkmelbourne.com.au/..._trains/862-20-eng-AU/metropolitan_trains.gif :


And one to scale from Wikipedia http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ways_map.gif/548px-Melbourne_railways_map.gif :


Melbourne's rolling stock is comprised mainly of four different models. These all come as three carriage units that can be joined to make six carriage units. These four models are the Siemens http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/00/SiemensFrankston.jpg :


The XTrapolis http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b1/XTrapolis_Mount_Waverley.jpg :


The EDI Comeng http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a1/EDI_Comeng.JPG :


And the Hitachi http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...indersStreet.jpg/800px-196MFlindersStreet.jpg :


Timetabling is difficult on Melbourne's suburban train network as it has to share track with regional and freight trains, as well as negotiating numerous road crossings, this puts it at a distinct disadvantage compared to a true Metro. Most lines run at an off-peak frequency of 15-20 mins, which increases for peak services and decreases for night services. As most lines share track, this has the effect of some inner city stations having numerous services, while outer suburban stations have relatively few. The system is nearing capacity, especially the city loop section.

The terminating station for all citybound trains and the heart of the system is Flinders St station, with approx 100,000 commuters and 1,500 trains passing through it each weekday. A station has occupied this site since 1854, and the current building dates from 1910. Here's the main entrance http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped....jpg/800px-Flinders_Street_Station_in_Wet.jpg :


The second largest station on the network is Southern Cross Station. Recently redeveloped, it's the hub of Victoria's state based transportation system with all intercity train and coach services terminating there. These two pictures show it's Spencer St facade, which was the stations former name:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...jpg/800px-Southern_Cross_Station_entrance.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/dd/Spencerstreet3.jpg/800px-Spencerstreet3.jpg


Other stations on the network include the underground stations of Flagstaff http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/46/Flagstaff3.jpg :

Melbourne Central http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5b/MelbCentral1.jpg :


And Parliament http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...latform_3.jpg/796px-Parliament_Platform_3.jpg :


:cheers:
 

·
Registered Abuser
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
Here are some of my own photos of Melbourne's train system.

This photo shows two XTrapolis trains at Camberwell station, my home station. I'm lucky as three lines run through this station, meaning I rarely have to wait more than five minutes for a city bound train:


Here we see a train on the Alamein line. The Alamein line is the last remenant of the old city circle line:


One of the entrances to Parliament Station. This is typical for all of Melbourne's underground stations except Melbourne Central, which unfortunately you have to travel through a shopping centre to get to:


The main entrance to Flinders St Station is a popular meeting place for Melburnians - many a date has been set with a casual, 'I'll meet you under the clocks':


This Seimens train is running along the viaduct that comprises the riverside section of the city loop; the rest of the city loop is underground. It was constructed in the 70's and 80's to relieve strain on Flinders St Station, but is now itself nearing capacity:


City bound Comeng train departing Camberwell station. The line runs completely at grade from here to the city, however further out it has many road crossings. Road crossings slow Melbourne's train system down, as well as disadvantage road users:


Here you can see many lines passing under Federation Square near Flinders St Station. There are 16 tracks here, an area known as the Jolimont rail yards:


:cheers:
 

·
Lurker
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
And again, here's some photos from me. I don't really have much, since there's only a couple of spots with trains which I usually pass with my camera.

Southern Cross station and its roof. Those red tentacle things used to extend across the bridge but they got rid of them when the station was built.


The Jolimont rail yards used to be about three or four times larger, with enough tracks to store most of the suburban fleet. But train stabling has now been moved to depots in the suburbs to convert the old sidings to parkland, with only through trains remaining: half of the suburban network passes through this area.

Here's a view from the next bridge, with the nose of one of the last few Hitachi trains still in service:


Underground portal, from the bridge beyond:


Flinders Street Station from above:


The other half of the suburban network passes through here, and part of the country fleet sits at the sidings:


This is the viaduct beside the CBD - the four-track one was built in the 1880s to connect what was then two isolated networks, the other one was built in the 1970s. With the exception of a few shuttle lines and a few non-loop services, every suburban service will pass over this section.
 

·
Gotta lite?
Joined
·
6,044 Posts
Thanks for posting. Melbourne has a very nice suburban/commuter network.
 

·
Registered Abuser
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
More photos.

A Comeng (Commonwealth Engineering) train entering East Camberwell Station. The Comeng trains were the last Australian built trains for Melbourne's network. The newer Seimens and XTrapolis are from Europe:


Another Comeng, this time on the city loop viaduct. Some people argue that the viaducts cut the CBD off from the river but I love them! It's great watching trains rattle by underneath the brooding skyscraper giants. The view from the train's great too:


You can have the same effect to the east in the Jolimont railyards. This will more than likely be covered in the near future, so savour it while you still can:


And here you can see the wavy roof of Southern Cross Station to the bottom right. This station just won an architectual award, deservedly in my opinion:


:cheers:
 

·
Registered Melbourne
Joined
·
4,166 Posts
Here are some of my own photos of Melbourne's train system.

Camberwell station, my home station. I'm lucky as three lines run through this station, meaning I rarely have to wait more than five minutes for a city bound train:

:cheers:
I've always lived (purposely) near junction stations (North Melbourne, Clifton Hill, Camberwell, Footscray), since I rely on public transport, but I have to ask you Gappa, how long does it take you to jog from Foster to your "home station" ? :)

(or maybe, like me, you live two lives!)

Very good photo summary, by the way. Invincible too.
 

·
Registered Abuser
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
(or maybe, like me, you live two lives!)
You guys seriously have a station called Batman...

Cool
My secret's out! Dananananananana Batman!

Seriously yes I live in two places, one in the city and one in the country.

Batman was the last name of one of Melbourne's founders. For a period he was pushing to name the new town Batmania! But the 'feds' went for the name of the British prime minister instead, mores the pity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Very Cool, wonder how much money you guys coulld get in royalties from Marvel (correct me if i'm wrong, i'm not good with comics) :)

I also see a very 'original' name of Reservoir, what's the reasoning behind that?

Melbourne seems to have a very good tram/train network, don't know if I can say the same for the buses.
 

·
Put it in your mouth
Joined
·
7,111 Posts
I've always wondered why the Melbourne train system isn't divided into distinct lines like it is in every other Australian city. There's no colour differation.

I would like it if there was...
 

·
Lurker
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
The reason why lines aren't colour coded is because of the zone-based ticketing system, where it is more important to help users determine which ticket they need to buy. Besides, there is no complex routing in the network and it's easy enough to determine the route of a train by following a line to its end on the map.

It's easy enough to tell that there are 15 electric lines, plus three lines which are sections of V/Line lines which accept suburban fares, plus a single diesel service operated by Connex (Stony Point) as well as a branch line which is only used a few weeks a year.

As for Batman, there's also Batman Avenue:
 

·
Registered Abuser
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
A diagram showing planned increases in track capacity. All well and good but we want new lines!

Originally posted by ZH836301:
 
1 - 20 of 655 Posts
Top