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Melbourne port sets shipping record
June 13, 2007 - 10:14AM

http://www.smh.com.au/news/National/Melbourne-port-sets-shipping-record/2007/06/13/1181414339940.html

The Port of Melbourne has set an Australian record, handling two million shipping containers in 12 months.

The milestone ranks Melbourne among the top five ports in the Southern Hemisphere - handing more than $75 billion in trade every year.

About 38 per cent of Australia's container trade passes through Melbourne, more than Adelaide, Brisbane and Fremantle combined and 25 per cent more than Sydney.

"As the first Australian port to reach this (two million container) milestone the port has confirmed its status as the nation's premier container port and demonstrated its importance to our economy," Minister for Roads and Ports Tim Pallas said.

"The port provides a critical international gateway for our exporters and importers, with links to over 300 ports across the world."

The record comes as the Port of Melbourne Corporation moves to deepen the Port Phillip Bay shipping channel to enable passage of larger cargo ships.

The controversial $760 million-plus project has yet to be approved.
 

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The addition of post panamax vessels (demand for goods pending) would suddenly up the container numbers by a huge amount. What is the delay in approval for dredging?
 

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Sounds like they are ahead of their forecasts. I think they moved only about 1.6 million last year and had forecast 2.1 million by 2010.

FYI: Forty two container shipping lines use the Port of Melbourne making 3,200 calls a year. The port has parter and sister arrangements with several foriegn ports including Shanghai, Philadelphia, Oakland, Osaka and Tianjin. For comparison, at Rotterdam, one of the worlds largest ports, they handled 5.8 million individual containers or 9.6 million TEU's.
 

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I find container terminals fascinating to watch! When you drive over the Bolte or West Gate at nigh, you really get a good impression of the sheer size of Melbourne's container terminals.

The only problems I rekon, is that the terminals and docks are far too close to the CBD and Docklands. If I were proposing to start from scratch, I would build them around Williamstown or Altona.

By the way, isn't Port Botany meant to have some sort of massive expansion happening soon?
 

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I posted this is another thread recently ...




So I'm not surprised!

In terms of gross tonnage of cargo shipped, the figures I just got from Answers.com/Wikipedia for 2004 for the busiest 50 seaports worldwide which were in the southern hemisphere were:

  • 25th: Pt. Headland Aust. (109 mill. tons) (up 21% since 2003)
  • 31st: Dampier Aust. (88 mill. tons)
  • 33rd: Hay Point Australia (86 mill. tons) (up 10% since 2003)
  • 36th: Newcastle (84 mill. tons)
  • 48th: Gladstone (63 mill. tons)

In other words, 5 of the 50 busiest ports world-wide were Australian.

The same site lists Melbourne as the 43rd busiest container-shipment port in the world; 1st in the southern hemisphere. (2nd, Durban, South Africa (50th)). Melbourne's container movements at that stage where 1,910,000 TEU /year , up 11% form the year before.
 

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The addition of post panamax vessels (demand for goods pending) would suddenly up the container numbers by a huge amount. What is the delay in approval for dredging?
just the usual Steve Bracks incompetence I guess. The bracks governemnt has an infamous record of delays and budget blowouts :bash:
 

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^^

The addition of post panamax vessels (demand for goods pending) would suddenly up the container numbers by a huge amount. What is the delay in approval for dredging?
Well, it's doubtful if if it would, since it would only come at someone else's expense, and Brisbane & Sydney both are planning significant port upgrades.

The dredging is highly contentious, because it affects the marine ecology of Port Phillip Bay. The Port of Melbourne won't retain it's 38% Australian share unless Panamax gets in, but note that at the same time people are calling for the Port of Melbourne and the freight terminal to be relocated in Western Port/Dandenong.

Off course it's always easier to call Bracks names than analyze the issues involved ...
 

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funnily enough the effects caused by dredging the bay will settle down in a year or two and nature will rapidly re-generate itself.

stupid greenie fucklets just cause all the hysteria without looking at the facts.
 

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^^

funnily enough the effects caused by dredging the bay will settle down in a year or two and nature will rapidly re-generate itself.

stupid greenie fucklets just cause all the hysteria without looking at the facts.
OK, give us the facts.

I might even agree with you, but you'd never have convinced me if I didn't.
 

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^^



OK, give us the facts.

I might even agree with you, but you'd never have convinced me if I didn't.
Dredging is essential from and economic stand point and is required for further growth and economic stability.

As for the environmental factor, I have no facts, damage would occur but the damage done to the economy by not dredging would in my mind be far worse.
 

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^^



Well, it's doubtful if if it would, since it would only come at someone else's expense, and Brisbane & Sydney both are planning significant port upgrades.

The dredging is highly contentious, because it affects the marine ecology of Port Phillip Bay. The Port of Melbourne won't retain it's 38% Australian share unless Panamax gets in, but note that at the same time people are calling for the Port of Melbourne and the freight terminal to be relocated in Western Port/Dandenong.

Relocation of the entire port wont happen, although they are planning an additional port in Westernport Bay when Port Melbourne reaches full capacity. That may take a bit of time as improvements in rail connections & the removal of the fruit & veggie market will create additional storage/transport infrastructure as well as plans to enhance the dock area immediatly west of the Bolte. .
Odd place to put a new port though, considering how shallow Westernport is. The dredgers would be running 24/7 & would generate enourmous amounts of spoil.
Im unsure how dredging would affect the bay. Im inclined to think the biggest problem would be at the heads & how the exchange of water from Bass Straight could alter the marine eco system in the bay. Dredging closer to the yarra mouth & mid way would probably be no different to the way they dredge now.
 

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Wow. Honkers is huge. And theres some sweet pics of giant container ships entering HK in the international section.
 

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Good news.

But don't you just laugh when you here this:

the top blah blah blah in the southern Hemisphere!!!!!!

How many rich countries are there in the Southern Hemisphere????
1 or 2???
 

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Good news.

But don't you just laugh when you here this:

the top blah blah blah in the southern Hemisphere!!!!!!

How many rich countries are there in the Southern Hemisphere????
1 or 2???
This is what exists in the southern hemishere:

1/3 of Africa, of which 1 country can be considered rich, Us, NZ, 1/2 of South America and a bunch of tiny atolls in the Pacific.

so yes you're right, there isnt exactly much to compare to in the southern hemisphere..
 

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Dredging is essential from and economic stand point and is required for further growth and economic stability.
That isn't a "fact", it's an opinion. There are lots of way further growth and economic stability can be attained without dredging the channel.

As for the environmental factor, I have no facts, damage would occur but the damage done to the economy by not dredging would in my mind be far worse.
As I said, perhaps I agree, that would have to depend upon just what the likely environmental damage amounted to.

It isn't just The stirring up of sediments that will "settle down in two weeks": Port Phillip Bay has an extremely narrow interface to Bass Strait: much narrower than a map of the coast indicates, since the deep water in the middle of the heads occupies only a very small portion of the width of the channel, as anyone who's been to Pt. Lonsdale at low tide will have observed.

Widening and deeepening the channel will result in a greater flow of water in and out of Port Phillip Bay, and this will mean higher flood tides, and lower neap tides. Greeneies might be concerned about this, but so will the people of Brighton and Elsternwick if the find the next king tide with a storm surge in their backyards or their kitchens. I imagine they would be looking for someone to sue, and I imagine they have the resources.

I'm not saying they will have have water in their kitchen any time soon, although eventually, with rising sea-levels, this is inevitable. What's obvious, however, is that an an investigation had to be conducted into the likely consequences of channel deepening and widening: i.e. of the Environmental Impact.

This process has been ongoing for some time. Amongst other things, trial dredging was undertaken to measure potential impacts. The Supplementary Environmental Effects Statement (EES) was released for Public comment last March.

My Opinion (which I'd never claim to be "facts").

The channel will be deepened, and the economic benefits viewed as more important than the inevitable changes that will result to Port Phillip Bay. Some of these changes might even be considered to be desirable: e.g. the bay will be flushed out to the ocean more effectively.

But at the very least, efforts were made to acertain what sort of environmental effects would occur, and some measure of testing took place (it's called "scientific method", or "experimentation"). You only need to look at some of the highly salinated country around the Murray to see examples of infrastructure projects undertaken for economic development that had quite unforseen consequences.

Fact: Kennett privatised the Port of Melbourne, along with the railways, power system, gas supply, etc., because he and his Government considered the development and maintenance of these things best left to market forces.
 

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This is what exists in the southern hemishere:

1/3 of Africa, of which 1 country can be considered rich, Us, NZ, 1/2 of South America and a bunch of tiny atolls in the Pacific.

so yes you're right, there isnt exactly much to compare to in the southern hemisphere..
No-one would claim the southern hemisphere is the economic power-house of the world, but it does amount to half the globe.

It also contains two of the five most populous nations on Earth: Indonesia & Brazil.
 
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