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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been wanting to do this for a while, I want a thread where we could just post stats and facts instead of continuously starting new threads or posting them in other mixed threads.

Post any and all Demographics for the Miami Metro Area such as populations lost or increase, cost of living changes, ethnic changes etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
More people than ever live in downtown Miami — and they're starting to raise families
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article211743454.html

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The idea of raising a family in the downtown urban core — with its high-rise living, stop-and-go traffic and adult-oriented entertainment such as nightclubs and restaurants — might have seemed nutty as recently as a decade ago. But a new analysis of Greater Downtown Miami demographics by the Miami Downtown Development Authority, which uses data from the U.S. Census, shows the population in Greater Downtown Miami has hit an all-time high of 92,235 — a 65 percent jump from 2000-2010 and another 38 percent increase from 2010-2018.

The number is projected to swell another 19 percent by 2021, with the total population in Greater Downtown Miami expected to reach 109,617. By comparison, the downtown area populations in similarly sized cities range from 26,850 in Atlanta to 48,000 in Dallas to 80,000 in Denver.

Young professionals between the ages of 25-44 are the most populous group in downtown Miami, comprising 45 percent of dwellers. But the number of children aged 14 and under has grown 53 percent since 2010, to a current total of 11,484 residents.

The number of family households — defined as people related by birth, adoption or marriage — has also spiked 42 percent, to 47,958.
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The Greater Downtown Miami area comprises 3.8 square miles east of I-95, west of Biscayne Bay, south of I-195 and north of the Rickenbacker Causeway. It is made up of seven neighborhoods: Brickell, Midtown, Edgewater, Wynwood, Historic Overtown, and the Central Business and Arts & Entertainment districts.
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Walkability issues
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Still missing: Clear walkways where pedestrians could stroll from Brickell to Edgewater and back without having to dodge traffic or breathe exhaust fumes.

In its latest annual list of the 15 most walkable cities in the U.S., the website WalkScore ranked Miami sixth — ahead of Seattle, Philadelphia, Chicago and Washington D.C. — specifically citing the neighborhoods of Wynwood, Edgewater and downtown. But Rosso said the city could do much better. He is a big supporter of the Biscayne Line, a proposed bayfront walkway that would connect Edgewater to downtown and Brickell.

"You see what places like New York have done with the High Line," the elevated public park that runs down the western side of Manhattan, Rosso said. "People will start using spaces where they can run and bike on the weekends, because when you live in an apartment, your space is smaller."

Other key findings from the Greater Downtown Miami demographics study:

▪ Downtown's daytime population, which includes residents, workers, students and tourists, is 250,757, or nearly 66,000 people per square mile — the densest in Miami-Dade County. Fort Lauderdale's downtown daytime population is 79,962, while West Palm Beach hits 25,187.

▪ The median household income in 2018 was $76,610, nearly double the Miami-Dade County median household income of $44,224, according to the U.S. Census. The per capita income was $52,200, more than double the Miami-Dade per capita income of $24,515.

▪ The average asking rent price per square foot for Class A office space in Brickell is $52.53 — the highest in Miami-Dade County — according to the 2018 first quarter report by JLL. Still, the vacancy rate is 10.3 percent, which is lower than the county-wide average of 12.3 percent.

Some experts say that although downtown's boom is good for Miami as a whole, the high cost of living in the urban core has consequences.

"A lot of people who work in downtown have been forced to move out into Kendall and Homestead," said Dr. Ned Murray, associate director of the Metropolitan Center at Florida International University. "Miami-Dade is the proverbial tale of two cities. The growth of downtown has no effect on the lack of public transit, the high cost of transportation and the housing index for people in Kendall and Doral and Homestead. There’s no progress there.

"Then you combine that with the environmental issues of sea-level rise and climate change," Murray said. "Brickell is in a storm surge planning zone that gets evacuated for Category 2 storms and above. We’re not building a very resilient Miami right now, but it continues to grow. At some point we’re going to have to face the consequences of that unless we take planning more seriously."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A lot of great information for many recent articles are coming from this study created by the Miami Downtown Development Authority. It is a great read of you like reading demographic stats, with charts and maps with layouts of populations and cost of living over the whole Miami Metro with a focus on Downtown Miami. I highly suggest giving this PowerPoint presentation a look.

http://miamidda.com/MiamiDDA/media/MiamiDDA/Documents/MDDA_DemoPopReport_05072018.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some highlights from that report by the MDDA can be found in this recent article by TheNextMiami.

Downtown Miami Population Up 38% Since 2010
https://www.thenextmiami.com/downtown-miami-population-up-38-since-2010/

Downtown Miami’s population is getting younger, wealthier, more female, and growing fast, according to a new study.

According to the newly released report by Miami’s Downtown Development Authority, the population of downtown Miami is up 38% since 2010.

3,700 new residents have moved in since the last study in 2016, or an increase of 4%. That number will likely increase with thousands of new apartments set to come to market in the next few years.

Women make up a greater percentage of downtown’s population than in 2010. The population is now 50.6% male and 49.4% female, compared to a 3% gap in 2010.

Also on the rise is median household income, up 55 percent since 2010 for area residents. Downtown Miami also boasts better educated residents than the rest of the region, with 54 percent of residents having a bachelors degree or higher.

Children are one of the district’s fastest-growing groups.There are now 11,484 residents ages 0-14 — a 53 percent increase since 2010.
 

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Interesting stats on page 23 of that Scribd report in the above article. Shows the rental rates along all the tri-rail and metrorail stations for South Florida. Not sure how they came up with those numbers but interesting nonetheless. I don't think anyone's done that before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Do note, that DownTown Miami's Population is almost certainly lower than what is reported due to many Condos being used as vacation homes for the rich.
 

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Do note, that DownTown Miami's Population is almost certainly lower than what is reported due to many Condos being used as vacation homes for the rich.
I'm confused, what does someone's financial status have to do with the population statistics? If they own a condo in downtown Miami aren't they rich already? Or did you mean to say "snow birds"?
 

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Yeah several big cities were not in the study. I'm guessing this guy who did it couldn't find the data he needed.
In reality all of these studies have to be inaccurate, there's really no way to account for people who don't file taxes, work under the table, or rent property with or without a signed lease (many landlords don't report rental income on their taxes). And if I understand Xer's comment correctly, lots of snow birds from out of town in Florida's major cities, many own many rent.
 

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I'm confused, what does someone's financial status have to do with the population statistics? If they own a condo in downtown Miami aren't they rich already? Or did you mean to say "snow birds"?
I'm pretty sure he's referring to people who may own a property downtown but only actually live there a part of the year, sometimes only a small part of the year. Many of them are wealthy South Americans but including others as well. Miami has a pretty sizable number of folks who would fit that criteria although I would not hazard a guess as to the actual percentage since it would be pure speculation. :cheers:
 

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Miami indeed does have a lot of this, and some even that NEVER live there, just buy it to keep large amounts of money outside of their own county. However Miami also has quite a few small companies (run by SAmerican's) that specialize in renting out those units on behalf of the owners as well. Enough of these companies that it makes me think just about all of the owners are renting those units out. Which makes me wonder just how many really are empty. I think a "how many condo buildings have lights on in them at night", might be the most accurate test we're going to get of the percentage of empty buildings.


Interesting aside, Miami has had a glut of condos for a year or two now (and still seeing more come on the market) and yet at the same time, a deficit of apartments for rent by people willing to pay +$2000/mo rent but don't want to buy. This tells me that many wealthy people would be able to buy a condo and turn around and rent it easily. That still counts as population as SOMEONE is occupying the unit right?
 

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^^The "lights on" test would seem to be as accurate a barometer as any. There's just no way to really tell unless you literally tracked these people's movements. In the most general sense, I think we could VERY safely say that downtown Miami's population is bigger in the Winter than other times of the year...but by how much I have no idea.

Just to backtrack, I also found it odd that NYC would not be included but perhaps that's because the numbers and percentages would be so incomparable to any other American city. I mean, with Manhattan alone virtually the entire island aside from the northernmost extreme could be considered a "downtown" relative to other cities...so the percentages would be something like 90% plus. Can't be compared to anything but other cities globally such as Tokyo or Hong Kong and a handful of others...nothing else remotely like that in the U.S. :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
^^ That is the sort of information I want to know more about. And yes I was talking about snow birds, though in Miami's case a lot of the snow birds are wealthy South Americans. If those units are continuously occupied, yes they should count. However, I wonder how many units are actually continuously rented out and occupied and how many sit empty most of the year.

Perhaps after the next census we would get a more clear understanding of these numbers, from the small amount of guess work I have read online, a significant of amount of the units might be empty most of the year. But for now I would agree with CalleOchoGringo, it is just a guess.
 

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Ok, in that case, unless they are from the remote regions of the Andes or frigid parts of Chile or Argentina, I suppose we should call them something else, like "Heat Birds" or something other than any asinine commonly known slurs.
 
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