Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Boston, a bastian of liberals, for which I personally am thankful. I'd like to know about the social/political climate of Miami. I find it strange that it is in a very conservative state and seems to have many conservative laws. Yet, at the same time it's becoming the premiere tourist and party destination of the USA. Bars and clubs remain open until 5:00AM. Yet, it is one of the only cities that sees fit to ban Pitbulls. I know the two have nothing to do with eachother. It just seems to be an odd political environment. How would you, Miami's residents describe it?
 

·
Contents Under Pressure
Joined
·
9,623 Posts
Liberal in lifestyle/attitude...Lazy about actually reading or voting.

Miami is a basically progressive city with the weirdness of geriatric Cold-Warriors mixed in (and a healthy dose of "duuh")
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
KEYWEST
MIAMI
FTLAUDERDALE
WEST PALM BEACH

ARE 4 COUNTIES THAT ARE VERY OPEN AND ACCEPTING OF LIFESTYLE AND ARE THE STATES MONEY MAKERS.

THE STATE ITSELF IS VERY CONSERVATIVE BECUASE OF PEOPLE LIKE BUSH
WHO HAVE BEEN IN OFFICE SINCE HE RIGGED THE ELECTION AGAINST JANET RENO. IF WE HAD JANET RENO IN THERE THE STATE WOULD HAVE BEEN MUCH MORE PROGRESSIVE AND WOULD HAVE HAD THIS BUILDING BOOM HAPPEN BACK AS EARLY AS 1996 WHEN THE CITY OF MIAMI HAD CLEANED UP THE STREETS FROM ALL THE TOURIST SMASH AND GRAB INCIDENTS.

OVERALL FLORIDA WILL RULE BY 2025
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,888 Posts
callanoj said:
I live in Boston, a bastian of liberals, for which I personally am thankful. I'd like to know about the social/political climate of Miami. How would you, Miami's residents describe it?
Definitely diverse. South Beach is overwhelmingly liberal...I went to Hillary fundraiser at the National a couple of months ago, it was very well received.
On the other hand, I was a guest of Sen. Bill Nelson (D)on Calle Ocho (he brought along the Senator from NJ, one of 3 Cuban Senators) for a town hall meeting and there were about three dozen people in the place; not well attended. That's interesting because there was a street festival outside the Theatre (Tower Theater I think) that was packed! Safe to say, Cubans are pretty strongly Republican, and the Elian move didn't help Janet Reno. Last time I shook Janet Reno's hand(October 2005), it was shaking quite a bit. She is one of the most brilliant people that I've ever heard speak (100 x's better than Colin Powell, as good as Rudy Guilliani) but she is really not in good enough health to have been Governor even if she would have won.
Don't believe everything you read in Internet posting sites, because Miami-Dade county voters do get out....not in as high as a percentage as Iraqis....but they do vote. Miami-Dade County people turn out in numbers slightly higher than Broward County voters. Source And Miami is home to one of the largest International Book Fairs in the World. Miami Dade College...one of the largest colleges in the United States.
Some of us are voting and reading...not all of us.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ChuckScraperMiami#1

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Roark said:
Definitely diverse. South Beach is overwhelmingly liberal...I went to Hillary fundraiser at the National a couple of months ago, it was very well received.
On the other hand, I was a guest of Sen. Bill Nelson (D)on Calle Ocho (he brought along the Senator from NJ, one of 3 Cuban Senators) for a town hall meeting and there were about three dozen people in the place; not well attended. That's interesting because there was a street festival outside the Theatre (Tower Theater I think) that was packed! Safe to say, Cubans are pretty strongly Republican, and the Elian move didn't help Janet Reno. Last time I shook Janet Reno's hand(October 2005), it was shaking quite a bit. She is one of the most brilliant people that I've ever heard speak (100 x's better than Colin Powell, as good as Rudy Guilliani) but she is really not in good enough health to have been Governor even if she would have won.
Don't believe everything you read in Internet posting sites, because Miami-Dade county voters do get out....not in as high as a percentage as Iraqis....but they do vote. Miami-Dade County people turn out in numbers slightly higher than Broward County voters. Source And Miami is home to one of the largest International Book Fairs in the World. Miami Dade College...one of the largest colleges in the United States.
Some of us are voting and reading...not all of us.
Thanks Roark,

This sums it up nicely. Is Ft. Lauderdale considered more or less liberal than Miami?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,285 Posts
florida is a southern state... but only in its norther half... if that makes sense

north and central florida are republican and conservative

but south florida offers many contrasts... on the one hand you have your large cuban population who are overwhelmingly republican, one of the few ethnic groups in the nation who are... but it seems everyone else in the city leems more to the left... large northern and jewish populations contribute heavily to this, and many second generation cubans are much more moderate than their parents... dade county usually ends up voting blue but not as overwhelmingly as other cities due to the cubans balancing out everyone else... outside of little havana, hialeah, and kendall you will find a fairly liberal, democratic city, i mean come on, look at south beach...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
as one of Cuban descent I will say most Cubans vote Republican because of Cuban politics & not necessarily because they are complete conservatives....Clinton was well liked among most Cubans until the Elian fiasco....Clinton was re elected in Miami twice.
Callonoj Ft. Lauderdale is also liberal....the largest bloc of Democratic voters in Florida live in Broward county.
 

·
Contents Under Pressure
Joined
·
9,623 Posts
Roark said:
Definitely diverse. South Beach is overwhelmingly liberal...I went to Hillary fundraiser at the National a couple of months ago, it was very well received.
On the other hand, I was a guest of Sen. Bill Nelson (D)on Calle Ocho (he brought along the Senator from NJ, one of 3 Cuban Senators) for a town hall meeting and there were about three dozen people in the place; not well attended. That's interesting because there was a street festival outside the Theatre (Tower Theater I think) that was packed! Safe to say, Cubans are pretty strongly Republican, and the Elian move didn't help Janet Reno. Last time I shook Janet Reno's hand(October 2005), it was shaking quite a bit. She is one of the most brilliant people that I've ever heard speak (100 x's better than Colin Powell, as good as Rudy Guilliani) but she is really not in good enough health to have been Governor even if she would have won.
Don't believe everything you read in Internet posting sites, because Miami-Dade county voters do get out....not in as high as a percentage as Iraqis....but they do vote. Miami-Dade County people turn out in numbers slightly higher than Broward County voters. Source And Miami is home to one of the largest International Book Fairs in the World. Miami Dade College...one of the largest colleges in the United States.
Some of us are voting and reading...not all of us.
I think the education levels in Miami are a very legitimate concern, however.

Looking up data from the census bureau, I found that only 52% of Miami residents are High School graduates (versus 80% nationally) and that a mere 16% have a College diploma.

Those aren't good numbers when trying to build a diverse workforce...and they may well scare away potential businesses who need skilled workers. Miami has a very hard time competing in that department...particularly against cities like Seattle, NY, Boston, DC, San Francisco and others that have dramatically better education levels.

I'm not trying to slam the city over this, but civic boosterism doesn't mean hiding from reality, either.

Miami (and South Florida in general) badly needs a prestigious university, imo. Yes, there are some individual degree programs at places like UM, FIU and FAU that are excellent...but none of those schools are competitive with the "big boys" nationally---at least if we are honest about it.

Hopefully, that situation will change for the better over time. It's crucial to South Florida's future in both retaining the best and brightest and also in developing a highly skilled (and paid) workforce.

Right now, that really isn't the case.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,888 Posts
spellbound said:
I think the education levels in Miami are a very legitimate concern, however.

Looking up data from the census bureau, I found that only 52% of Miami residents are High School graduates (versus 80% nationally) and that a mere 16% have a College diploma.

Those aren't good numbers when trying to build a diverse workforce...and they may well scare away potential businesses who need skilled workers. Miami has a very hard time competing in that department...particularly against cities like Seattle, NY, Boston, DC, San Francisco and others that have dramatically better education levels.

Miami (and South Florida in general) badly needs a prestigious university, imo. Yes, there are some individual degree programs at places like UM, FIU and FAU that are excellent...but none of those schools are competitive with the "big boys" nationally---at least if we are honest about it.
Oh yeah, I'd agree it's a concern...but as Paul Hodgeson (formerly the Chief Census taker in the Ford/Carter/Reagan Administration says, "you guys beat yourself up too much on this". He notes that although we don't educate as many college grads as other places, we sure do attract them! He notes that places like Massachuessets are net donors to us. Northeastern states graduate their students and they move to Florida.
It is somewhat comforting to hear such a man (a Minnesotean (sp?)) give us high marks in education. Further, he tells us that the fact that our schools are bilingual make students much more equipt to handle the global economy.
That's muy bueno!
 
  • Like
Reactions: ChuckScraperMiami#1

·
Contents Under Pressure
Joined
·
9,623 Posts
Roark, I just hope those transplanted grads "coming to Florida" are actually landing in Miami. At least a healthy percentage of them.

We agree on this stuff.

I just want Miami to be what it can be (and that's something that goes FAR beyond tall buildings...regardless of how much we like them).

Hopefully, I'll be welcomed on this forum. Miami is my hometown, and I'll always love it.

Would I move back? No. I'm happy where I am.

But that doesn't mean I don't care (or that I wasn't yelling for the Heat today...LOUDLY)

And don't get me started about the Dolphins.... (Nick Saban is the real deal)

But I AM a Miami native with roots in that town to the 1930s...I enjoy this forum...and even if I'm skeptical about a LOT of these things actually being built and don't feel like doing cartwheels about EVERY project, I want to chime in and participate.

That OK with you folks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
spellbound said:
Miami is my hometown, and I'll always love it.

Would I move back? No. I'm happy where I am.
I know so many people who have moved or are moving to Miami. Yet, I also know a good amount of people who, like you, come from the Miami area and prefer living in the North East. I have always liked Miami. I'd live there for the weather alone.
 

·
Savior of Gondor
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
callanoj said:
I know so many people who have moved or are moving to Miami. Yet, I also know a good amount of people who, like you, come from the Miami area and prefer living in the North East. I have always liked Miami. I'd live there for the weather alone.
Its not just the Northeast. I live in a small town in south central Minnesota and where I work I know at least 3 other people who lived in the Miami area, and like me none of them wish to move back. I like 4 seasons so the weather except for a few weeks in winter isnt a draw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Miami Beach is very liberal. LOL









Lesbians party with purpose in South BeachBY LYDIA MARTIN
[email protected]

RONNA GRADUS/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

They tore up the terrazzo dancing salsa at South Beach's Pearl. They jammed to electronica and played make-believe news anchors and firefighters at the Miami Children's Museum. They did the Dirty-South grind, chains of them in bikinis and surfer shorts, around the pool at the Surfcomber on Collins Avenue.

More than 7,000 lesbians, from South Florida, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, even Canada, France and South America, came together over the weekend for the blowout fundraiser Aqua Girl. They didn't stop dancing until well into Sunday evening.

They also didn't stop surprising themselves with their ease in blending together. In a culture that rigorously breaks down into types -- butch/lipstick, urban gear/Birkenstocks, baby ****/older lesbian -- Aqua Girl, in its sixth year, is notable for its ability to bulldoze barriers.

''We're talking to all kinds of girls. It's not always that way at home. Lesbians tend to stay segregated,'' said Stacey Wallace, 35, a black narcotics officer with the Philadelphia police force.

Wallace and her girlfriend, Lori Smith, 37, also a Philly police officer, strolled the Surfcomber pool party Saturday afternoon, making new friends among the 1,500 revelers.

Anglo gays and lesbians tend be the most involved -- and most visible -- in South Florida activism circles. Their Hispanic and black counterparts may be large in numbers, but they are from communities where being out can be more costly.

During Aqua Girl weekend, local lesbians who are rarely on the scene mixed with the always out-and-proud. The dinner, comedy night, brunch and sold-out dance parties (one of them, called Candyland, at the Children's Museum) attracted everybody, including hip-hoppers, rockers and the reggaeton set, and everything, including Lil' Kim look-alikes, J.Lo wannabes and Shane clones.

But for all the different looks and backgrounds, it was a celebration of commonality.

''Everybody is on the same page,'' said Kara Ferguson, 26, a black kitchen expediter for Home Depot who flew in from Mantua, N.J. ``Aqua Girl is how it should be every day.''

You only had to say ''The L Word,'' and folks in the crowd responded with the name of the character they're having a TV thing with on the Showtime lesbian soap.

''Shane for sure,'' said Colombian Maribel Alvarez, 23, of Hialeah, who studies accounting at Florida International University.

Alvarez's girlfriend, an FIU student who lives with her Cuban parents in Kendall, is ''more of a Carmen girl'' -- but she didn't want to be on the record.

''I work as a secretary in a very Cuban medical office. It wouldn't be cool if my co-workers knew I was a lesbian,'' said the 26-year-old, in lipstick and high heels at the sun-baked pool party.

``Yeah, I guess I do look like a straight girl. I don't want to wear a sign that says I'm gay because not everybody would be cool with that. That's just the reality. I don't even really go to gay clubs. But Aqua Girl is a big deal.''

The weekend, produced by volunteers, benefits the Women's Community Fund, which supports the local lesbian community through grants and scholarships. With the $86,000 generated by last year's Aqua Girl, the organization gave $15,000 to such groups as the Gay & Lesbian Film Festival and Pridelines Youth Services and set aside $30,000 to create a women's healthcare initiative. They hoped to boost this year's take to $100,000.

''There are other women's weekends around the country. But they're mostly for profit,'' said Alison Burgos, president of the Women's Community Fund. ``This one is 100 percent about giving back to the community. It's volunteer-driven, and the locals really take pride in it. It's about partying, but it's also about being involved.''

About 60 percent of the crowd this year was from South Florida, Burgos said. Organizers keep admission prices affordable to attract a mix of women.

''The pool party is $15 in advance and $20 at the door because we want everybody to be able to come,'' said Burgos, a longtime lesbian-events promoter. ``We don't want to exclude the younger girls or the girls who don't have a lot of money. We want the whole community to be out.''

Even a few straight girls in the crowd felt the vibe of inclusiveness. Jen Scordamaglia, 17, and Jen Buitrago, 18, who were hired to model tiny Perfect Tan bikinis at the pool party, were at ease in a sea of ogling lesbians.

''When a guy says something to you, you want to slap their face,'' Jen Scordamaglia said. ``But these girls are all really respectful. I'm more comfortable here than I usually am around all straight people.''
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
......Right. But then the city government sees fit to ban an entire breed of dog. I know this seems trivial, but Miami and Denver are the only cities in the country who think it's ok to tell people they can't owna certain breed of dog because it has become the fashionable breed for thugs to turn into weapons.

In my mind that is incredibly backwards thinking. That said, I love the city and it's grown, culturally leaps and bounds. It just seems to be a strange dinamic in it's social/poitical climate.
 

·
Savior of Gondor
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Logy I am liberal and I have no problems with gays. I think people should be accepted for who they are, not who others want them to be. I do have a problem with inappropriate behavior in public..like in your pictures. I feel that nothing should be done in public that is not acceptable for children to see, because often they do.
So I want to be the first to say, yes Dale me, that bad behavior is not liberal, its just bad behavior. I imagine that Dale (who I know is conservative, and have no problem with) and I would agree probably about 95% on what is acceptable in public. We may agree less on what is acceptable in private :).
 

·
Savior of Gondor
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Roark said:
Oh yeah, I'd agree it's a concern...but as Paul Hodgeson (formerly the Chief Census taker in the Ford/Carter/Reagan Administration says, "you guys beat yourself up too much on this". He notes that although we don't educate as many college grads as other places, we sure do attract them! He notes that places like Massachuessets are net donors to us. Northeastern states graduate their students and they move to Florida.
It is somewhat comforting to hear such a man (a Minnesotean (sp?)) give us high marks in education. Further, he tells us that the fact that our schools are bilingual make students much more equipt to handle the global economy.
That's muy bueno!
Minnesotan :), or as they say in Fargo, Minnesooootaan (sorry, no German accent with Rider, but the town 20 miles west of me has people born there that have German accents, and that isnt uncommon for the town). Im not sure attracting college grads is that great an accomplishment. It means people from out of state come and take all the jobs and run the show while people from Florida (which has one of the lowest graduation rates in the nation) are stuck doing the crappy low paying jobs.
It would be a greater accomplishment if they could graduation a larger number of students and get more to go to college (Minnesota graduates over 80% of its highschool students and around 32% of its adult population is college educated). We are one of the best educated states in America, and this shows with one of the highest quality of living in America. The two are directly connected. Look at the graduation rates of the larger school districts in Florida and you see the problem Miami Dade 57%, Hillsborough 55%, Pinelass 56%, Broward 60%, Palm Beach 58%, the state as a whole is only 59%.
I can tell you from living in a place that is very educated (which means your football team isnt very good..really) that it is much nicer. The quality of life is wonderful, schools are good abviously, we have great libraries and museums. The crime rate is lower and jobs are generally better paying and more interesting. Where I live 89% of the people over 25 have high school degrees and the number of people who are college educated is abour 40%. Very educated, that is an accomplishment Miami needs to shoot for in the long run and its a winning strategy.
 

·
Miaminole
Joined
·
151 Posts
rider_of_rohan said:
Logy I am liberal and I have no problems with gays. I think people should be accepted for who they are, not who others want them to be. I do have a problem with inappropriate behavior in public..like in your pictures. I feel that nothing should be done in public that is not acceptable for children to see, because often they do.
So I want to be the first to say, yes Dale me, that bad behavior is not liberal, its just bad behavior. I imagine that Dale (who I know is conservative, and have no problem with) and I would agree probably about 95% on what is acceptable in public. We may agree less on what is acceptable in private :).

What makes kissing in public bad behavior?
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top