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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So apparently, the older Upper Eastside thread was closed by the moderators, so I'm starting it up again, because it's an unique and important Miami neighborhood.

From today's Miami Herald:

Car wash design fits Upper Eastside area, historic board says

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/miami_dade/neighbors/story/564429.html

Miami's Historic and Environmental Preservation Board says the design for a planned car wash in the Upper Eastside harmonizes with its surroundings.

And in a bid to win over neighbors who don't want a fifth car wash in the area, its proponents said they'd like to throw in some concessions, including restoration of downtown's famous Coppertone sign, to help calm residents' concerns.

With a recent 5-2 vote, the board granted the owners of Green Carwash LLC the certificate of appropriateness they'll need to build in the historic Miami Modern, or MiMo, district.

Most board members decided the proposed building's ship-like design and porthole windows conform with the surrounding MiMo district, which runs along Biscayne Boulevard from Northeast 50th to 77th streets. It's identifiable by kitschy motels, clashing colors and angular post-World War II architecture.

And not everyone in the neighborhood opposes the wash plan. Dipak Patel, owner of the Royal Motel, said Monday he wants to see fewer empty lots in the area. ''More businesses and more people could help reduce crime,'' he said.

The board added some conditions to the approved certificate, including:

• The structure must be built parallel to the boulevard.

• Some asphalt must be replaced with decorative pavers.

• A wall on the property's east side must be eight feet high to help block noise.

• On weekends, nine employees must wipe down cars to move them along faster.

''If it's subject to these conditions, it meets the intent of Chapter 23,'' said board member Gerald Marston, referring to the city's historic preservation ordinance.

Mickey Marrero, attorney for the car wash owners, said the certificate was the last permit the group needs from a city board. ``Every other permit we need can be obtained administratively.''

But many in the surrounding area don't want another car wash in a district where they're trying to promote walking. ''If they agreed to put retail along the front it could help bring in pedestrian traffic,'' MiMo group leader Fran Rollason said.

The company's offering concessions. It plans to include a small coffee shop in the wash's waiting room and repair of the Coppertone sign, recently removed from a downtown building. The MiMo Biscayne Association owns the 49-year-old Miami relic.

Marrero also said the project's wiring and plumbing will, with a few tweaks, allow the building to be used as a restaurant should the car wash fail.

Denise Galicic, one of the venture's co-owners, said in an e-mail that she and her partners are discussing how to incorporate the concessions.

Both Marrero and Rollason said the two groups would meet this week to discuss the fate of the Coppertone Girl.
 

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One Brickell CityCentre
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What is so important about that neighborhood?

I wonder why it was closed.
Well, what is so important about to me is the fact that it's my neighborhood. And as far as why it was closed, oftentimes, the last post is a clue.
 

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Son, I don't want to get into sentimental issues right now, but it doesn't matter how valuable that neighborhood is for you. I talk to you as the son I might have in the future. Upper Eastside is like anyother neighborhood outside Miami's CBD. Nothing interesting.
 

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One Brickell CityCentre
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Son, I don't want to get into sentimental issues right now, but it doesn't matter how valuable that neighborhood is for you. I talk to you as the son I might have in the future. Upper Eastside is like anyother neighborhood outside Miami's CBD. Nothing interesting.
Well, property values seem to have appreciated a little better than other neighborhoods outside of the CBD. It is still up in coming. As thetallerthebetter said, it is where the Bohemian crowd that was part of South Beach in the 90s migrated to. It has a little bit of a Greenwich Village feel to it. And it's been a while since I've been called son. Makes me feel young again. These days, it's more like sir or mister.
 

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I find it to be a very interesting neighborhood,they have made vast improvements,especially on Biscayne Boulevard as they have added many trees in the center of the boulevard and have torn down old buildings with replacement of condominiums. I noticed on Google maps street views that there are quite a few of the old motels(Vagabond Motel etc.) up for sale on MIMO on BIBO area. Of course Google street views is somewhat dated they might have sold by now. It does appear that the area between 65th and 77th need trees ,it is lacking there,but as I stated it is a dated street view.

Does anyone know if they sold the WPLG Channel 10 station, I noticed that was for sale on Google Street View?

I don't even recognize that area or anything on Biscayne Blvd. except for a few places and that has only been a few years since I have visited here..
 

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One Brickell CityCentre
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The Upper Eastside for some reason intrests me alot, I like to hear everything going on and its just a really cool place right now. I just have not visited yet.
Really cool people like me live here. Just kidding! :lol:
 

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http://cbs4.com/local/Miami.Design.District.2.772527.html


SoHo South: MIA Design District Undergoes Makeover
Miami Design District Often Referred To As SoHo Miami Or SoHo South

MIAMI (CBS4) ― What was once a sparsely populated Miami neighborhood is undergoing a true renaissance. Instead of being sparsely populated, the Miami Design District is now populated with high-end fashion boutiques, jewelers, restaurants and art galleries.

Known for its top notch design stores as well, the Miami Design District is the place where those in the trade bring in clients to see the latest in interior furnishings and décor.

But recently, thanks to a few notable chefs, the district is also bringing in a new crowd. "Foodies" who enjoy a nice glass of wine and a good meal.

Chef Michael Schwartz of Michael's Genuine Food & Drink on Northeast 40th Street, is described as a pioneer when it comes to the restaurant scene in the district.

"I love that, I wanted to be the pioneer, we wanted to be first, we knew what was going to happen in this area and I've had my eye on it for a long time, and I knew, I liked it just the way it was but I knew it was going to change and it has already," Schwartz told CBS4's Lisa Petrillo.

In the past year, four other notable restaurants have set up shop. Jonathan Eismann's Pacific Time moved off Lincoln Road and is now located at 35 NE 40th Street.

Up the street is the elegant Fratelli Lyon, located at 4141 Second Avenue. Down the courtyard is the Mediterranean bistro Brosia Miami, located at 163 NE 39th St. and on the corner is Domo Japones, 4000 NE 2nd Ave., an eclectic Asian restaurant with a cool vibe serving black edamame and a delicious spicy tuna roll.

Amir Ben Zion owns Domo Japones and Scott Engleman is the owner of Brosia.

The Miami Design District, which stretches only 18 blocks, is described as relaxed, without the pressure of South Beach and filled with really nice people.

The five restaurants in the neighborhood are also creating a new consumer base. More and more people consider the district a destination rather than those who go just for the trade.

It's not just restaurants that are opening up in the district, there are high-end fashion boutiques, like En Avance, which sells women and children's clothing and jewelry. It opened last month after the owner moved her high-end store from the high-rent of Lincoln Road.

"Lincoln Road has pretty much tripled, the rents have gone through the roof and it's become very corporate and very kind of commercial, so I felt that its lost a lot a lot of its charm so I was looking for a new location to kind of reinvent myself," said En Avance owner Karen Quinones.

The Miami Design District has reinvented itself into a vibrant and growing neighborhood, where art and design combine for good taste and good fun.

"The unique thing about the design district is that there really is an air of sophistication, so it's a safe clean neighborhood, it's very confined within a small radius and people are comfortable coming here. There's a lot of activity, a lot of heart," said Scott Engleman.

Coming soon to the district, a 150 room boutique hotel which is set to begin construction next year. There are also more office buildings being planned, along with more residential buildings to make it more of a living neighborhood.
 

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One Brickell CityCentre
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N.E. 71st Street and the railroad tracks
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3257/2684235882_ddfec8d29f_b.jpg


N.E. 77th Street & Biscayne Blvd, the end of Mimo with Blue, Paramount, & Marquis still visible
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3032/2705526470_fa25b61726_b.jpg


N.E. 79th Street and the railroad tracks
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3270/2704983500_aed863dbb0_b.jpg


N.E.86th Street and Biscayne Blvd in front of Big Daddy's (no, I was not there today), and a piece of the skyline is still visible
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3293/2705563870_b8fc215dd9_b.jpg
 

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Contents Under Pressure
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The area seems like an up and comer, where would be a good place to live... that Blue building seems pretty cool. Thoughts?

thanks.
People here had mixed reviews of Blue in the past so I'm not sure how things are there today.

If it was me, I'd look into some of the great old housing stock around the Design District area or (on a bigger budget) east of the Boulevard in Morningside. That would actually put you in closer proximity to the "MiMo" area rather than where Blue is.

Not quite as close, but I'd also recommend checking out my old stomping grounds of El Portal. Lots of great old places full of character there and you can still find relative bargains the further west you go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
New restaurants add sizzle to the Upper East Side

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/top-stories/story/669693.html

Walking up to Red Light, the funky diner attached to Motel Blu on Miami's Upper East Side, the hungry customer might be subjected to images of Biscayne Boulevard's sketchier past.

The occasional working girl still struts down the sidewalk in short shorts, and from time to time a cracked-out soul weaves through traffic. But if you knew the neighborhood even five years ago, you would recognize how much has changed.

Yes, there is still crime. But retailers are multiplying. The area's historic architecture looks spiffed up. And perhaps this is the best reason to rejoice if you live in the upscaling 'hoods from Buena Vista to Shorecrest: Finally there are real restaurant options in an area that not long ago was a culinary desert.

There is something almost surreal about nibbling on scones and finger sandwiches at the Pineapple Blossom Tea Room on 82nd Street; crunching into a conch fritter sushi roll at Moshi Moshi on 72nd; listening to the waiter at Red Light, on 77th, talk about the menu:

Barbecued shrimp with a rosemary-lemon shrimp stock. Fennel-orange snapper sous vide. Slow-roasted spare ribs. And how about a side of mac and cheese gooey with Gruyere, Morbier and sharp white Cheddar?

Red Light, which opened in the spring but only recently expanded service from three nights a week to six, plans to unveil patio seating downstairs by the Little River where manatees, iguanas and blue herons often loiter, adding to the Old Florida-meets-New vibe around which chef-owner Kris Wessel built his concept.

''I call the food current regional. It's not just mangoes and avocados that we're using but a lot of new local organics,'' says Wessel, who was sous chef at Mark's Place in the early 1990s and later opened Paninoteca on Lincoln Road and Liaison on Española Way. The place has become a must for foodies who remember Wessel's name. But so far, Red Light is keeping its menu real with starters priced between $7 and $9 and large plates topping out at $25.

The patio, will seat 40 (there's room for 38 inside) and feature a raw bar of West and East Coast oysters, ceviches, Glades frog legs in garlic and sour orange.

''This may seem like a very urban spot, but it also has a Florida state park aspect down by the river,'' Wessel says.

SOYKA THE PIONEER

After South Beach restaurant pioneer Mark Soyka (News Cafe, Van ****) opened Soyka at the 55th Street Station off Biscayne Boulevard in 1999, a food scene began emerging along the ragged corridor.

There have been plenty of casualties: 5061 Eaterie, which gave way to Douglas Rodriguez's OLA, which eventually moved to South Beach; Boulevard Bistro in the lobby of an office building on 71st Street, now home to the neon-happy Moonchine Asian Bistro; 72nd Street's Kemia Mediterranean, which replaced Sushi Box, which replaced Suzanne's Vegetarian Bistro, which is now the Argentine Che Soprano.

But some places have hung in, even through prolonged but now completed road construction that inhibited car and foot traffic. Casa Toscana, the popular little trattoria that opened on 70th Street in 2001, survives. So does Uva 69, which opened on 69th Street in 2004. And Michy's, featuring the upscale cuisine of Miami star chef Michelle Bernstein, seems as busy as it did when it opened in early 2006.

Still under construction at Biscayne and 68th Street is the residential-retail building that will house Balans. The British chain with an outpost on Lincoln Road will soon add two other restaurants. The one on the Upper East Side is slated to open in about a year, and another in Mary Brickell Village should debut in the next few weeks.

SIMPLE FOOD

Residents of Edgewater, Buena Vista, Morningside, Bayside, Belle Meade and areas north are regulars at the Design District's new upscale hot spots (Michael's Genuine, Fratelli Lyon, Pacific Time, Domo Japones). But sometimes what you crave are simple, quality neighborhood eats, says Fran Rollason, president of the MiMo Biscayne Association, working to preserve the historic Miami Modern architecture along the boulevard.

''I moved to Belle Meade three years ago from South Dade, where every restaurant you went to, you had to wait 45 minutes until you were called,'' Rollason says. ``Here, you go to a place, and the next time you come in, they know your name. That's what struck me about this area when I first moved here. It feels like a real community. And now every day it seems there are more great, laid-back little restaurants to go to.''

Just north of the Design District is one of those new neighborhood gems, the unassuming Buena Vista Bistro at Northeast Second Avenue and 46th Street, a cozy spot where you'll find artists, gallery owners, hipsters and gentrification pioneers.

The menu is French-inspired: escargot à la Provenc¸al, grouper in beurre blanc, jumbo scallops in tarragon butter, rib-eye steak and fries. Most entrees are kept below $20, and a decent bottle of wine runs about $30. Although the place is tiny (20 seats inside and another 40 coming in a couple of weeks when the side patio opens), the owners understand the most important part of neighborhood dining is the invitation to linger over wine and conversation.

''The reason we are adding the patio is that we like staying small, but we also don't want our customers waiting on the sidewalk,'' says Callie Bienvenu, who runs the front of the house while husband Claude Postel does the cooking.

They were part owners of Casablanca on Ocean Drive and the President on Collins Avenue but moved to Buena Vista so their dog could have a back yard.

''This was the first time we knew our neighbors,'' Bienvenu says. They took over the former A restaurant space, spent about $100,000 to renovate and opened early this year.

''We just wanted to open something with simple, fresh food,'' Bienvenu says. ``We don't have fancy decor. We don't have fancy dishes. We don't print fancy menus. The money we save we pass on to our customers.''

TEA ROOM

Frances Brown, who opened Pineapple Blossom Tea Room in April 2006 and barely survived the road construction that quickly followed, has a similar philosophy about keeping things simple. The former pastry chef for the Soyka group wanted to offer ``a place where you could just unwind.''

There isn't much to the decor, but the menu is creative, and everything, down to the scones, is house-made. Among the wraps are the Mandevilla (steamed calabaza, chayote, carrots and chickpeas with Caribbean curry dressing, fig chutney, greens, tomatoes and avocado) and the Bird of Paradise (poached shrimp salad topped with avocado and tropical fruit salsa).

But don't miss out on the full tea service, offered all day and featuring an assortment of tea sandwiches, pastries, scones, jams and jellies for $16.95.

Offering a spot where customers feel comfortable to stay a spell is also the motivation behind G Lounge, opening in a couple of weeks above tiny but spot-on Sushi Square at 72nd Street.

French brothers Yann and Julien Durosini shopped high end and low for the comfy modern couches and chairs, the Moroccan lamps and other accents that fill a main room and several nooks where customers can nosh on sushi from downstairs and global tapas: scallop ceviche; shrimp katafi with coconut curry nage; spiced, crusted ahi tuna; charcoal-grilled prosciutto-wrapped summer peach with orange zest and honey-rosemary vinaigrette.

The place will have a special night to cater to the large gay community that lives in surrounding neighborhoods and other themed events.

If you want to focus on sushi, you might want to try Moshi Moshi just next door, an outpost of the 10-year-old Moshi Moshi on Washington Avenue. The sushi and sashimi options are extensive, as are the cold and hot starters (baby sardines with ground daikon; spicy crab ceviche; okonomiyaki, or Japanese-style pizza).

The owners have plenty of cred. Toshi Furihata was executive chef at Sushi Samba, and Hiro Terada was executive chef of Doraku, both on Lincoln Road. And Yani Yuhara was senior marketing manager for Benihana headquarters in Doral.

''There are no tricks to succeeding in the restaurant business. The food has to be good,'' Yuhara says. ``Then you have word of mouth. And that works in this neighborhood because there is a real community here. Just look at how much residents have done to turn the neighborhood around. Every day, it looks better.''
 

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Vagabond Motel

Vagabond Motel owner talks up plans for outdoor market
Most who heard about Vagabond Motel owner Eric Silverman's plan for an outdoor market at the MiMo gem raised their hands in support. A new ordinance would allow the market at the motel.
Posted on Tue, Sep. 09, 2008
By LAURA MORALES
[email protected]

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/miami-dade/communities/story/677847.html



A rendering of the proposed changes for the Vagabond Hotel. Owner Eric Silverman's ideas include a cooking school, a fresh fish store, several restaurants and an open-air weekend market.
HAND-OUT | FOR THE MIAMI HERALD
A rendering of the proposed changes for the Vagabond Hotel. Owner Eric Silverman's ideas include a cooking school, a fresh fish store, several restaurants and an open-air weekend market.

During a recent community meeting, several Upper Eastside residents lauded a plan -- including an open-air market -- to revive the Vagabond Motel.

Commissioner Marc Sarnoff also introduced an ordinance that could make the proposed outdoor market legal.

At the end of the Sept. 4 meeting, motel owner Eric Silverman asked the 60 or so folks gathered at Legion Park to give a show of hands for or against his plan.

Nearly all -- except a few who disapprove -- showed their support of the ambitious ideas Silverman has for the building, including a fish market and several restaurants.

Current zoning laws ban such a market.

But Sarnoff's proposed ordinance, modeled after the one governing markets in Coconut Grove, would change that. Among its provisions, outdoor markets in the Biscayne Boulevard corridor can only operate from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays and must be located on parcels of at least 15,000 square feet and occupy no more than 65 percent of their parcels.

To open a market, its operator would need a special permit from the city.

After Sarnoff introduced the proposed measure, attendees voiced their opinions of Silverman's vision for the Vagabond, which architectural historian Teri D'Amico called ``the diva of the MiMo District.''

D'Amico said she was worried that an outdoor market at the Vagabond would become a junk bazaar. That's the same worry that for years kept the city from approving the Legion Park market before it was finally OK'd in December.

''I do not think this is positive,'' she said.

City zoning administrator Lourdes Slazyk noted that, under the proposed ordinance, the market can only offer handmade crafts, fresh produce and raw food and drinks made from fresh produce and only on weekends.

She added that violations of the ordinance's conditions would mean no renewal of the special permit.

Most of those who stood up to speak said they support the market and Silverman's big plan.

Casa Toscana owner Sandra Stefani said more business and bustle are exactly what the MiMo corridor needs to keep growing. ''You're going to have growing pains, traffic, inconveniences, but that will be for the good of the neighborhood,'' she said.

At one point, attorney Michael Tarre, whose uncle Sidney Goldberg built the Vagabond in 1953, stood up to praise the new plan for the motel.

''I like it,'' he said on Monday.

``I give the guy a lot of credit. What he wants to do isn't a lot different from what we did outdoors back then.''

But a small group of Belle Meade residents maintain a staunch opposition and raised their hands to that effect.

''We want time for the Legion Park market to work. Besides, an open market doesn't belong abutting a historic building,'' neighborhood association secretary Rosemary Ference said Monday. ``We also don't want to see Northeast Sixth Court become a parking lot.''

Silverman has said he would like to have angled parking along Sixth Court, which abuts Belle Meade.

At the end of the meeting, Sarnoff tried to reassure residents, saying the measure can be fine-tuned if needed. ''No one's going to thrust anything upon you,'' he said.

The proposed ordinance will go before the city's Planning Advisory Board at its Sept. 17 meeting.
 
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Coppertone Girl Update

She's been getting a makeover courtesy of the MiMo on BiBo folks ... the new and improved Coppertone Girl will be unveiled to the world December 1st at 5:30PM.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! :banana:
 

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Contents Under Pressure
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She's been getting a makeover courtesy of the MiMo on BiBo folks ... the new and improved Coppertone Girl will be unveiled to the world December 1st at 5:30PM.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! :banana:
That's great. Very cool that the sign has found a new life.

Here's another golden oldie (long gone) from Pier 5 downtown...the current site of Bayside. I actually have a similar print of it framed at home:

 

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Alonzo Mourning shoots to build affordable housing in Overtown

Miami Heat star Alonzo Mourning wants to develop a 190-unit affordable rental housing community for families and the elderly in downtown Miami’s Overtown neighborhood.
The Alonzo Mourning Charities wants to lease 5 acres of Miami-Dade County-owned land at the southwest corner of Northwest Third Avenue and 17th Street for a $1 a year. The Miami-Dade County Housing Agency currently calls the site home.
Miami-Dade’s Economic Development and Human Services Committee is scheduled to hear the request on Wednesday. It then is set to go before the Miami-Dade County Commission on Dec. 2. Commissioner Audrey Edmonson, who sponsored the resolution, did not return calls for comment.
In addition to being part of the Heat’s championship team in 2006, Mourning has, through his nonprofit organization, sponsored the annual Zo’s Summer Groove all-star basketball game to raise money for his charity. The charity was behind construction of the Overtown Youth Center in 2003 and sponsors the Honey Shine mentoring program for young girls.
According to the nonprofit’s most recent tax return available, it had $2.8 million in revenue and spent $2.1 million on programs and services in 2006. It was $90,480 in the red at the end of that year.
If the county commission approves the rental-housing proposal, it would be a first for the nonprofit.
“We are not in a position to talk about it at this time,” said Lisa Joseph, development director for Mourning Charities. She did not answer an e-mailed question about the project’s funding source.
Joseph referred questions to developer Shawn Wilson, executive VP of the Housing Trust Group, a Coconut Grove-based for-profit real estate investment, development and management company, which has completed other affordable housing projects in South Florida.
Wilson confirmed that Mourning’s charity plans to construct three buildings with about 190 units total, as listed in the resolution. About 95 of the two- and three-bedroom units would be reserved for families with an income at or below 60 percent of the county’s adjusted median income. Elderly residents will have to meet the same income criteria to qualify for the 95 planned one-bedroom units.
Wilson said his company and the charity would form a joint venture to develop the property. He declined to say whether the land would be put into a land trust.
Properties developed by land trusts pay property taxes. But, appreciation in land value is limited through the terms of a long-term lease.
Mourning’s charity plans to apply for tax credits from the Florida Housing Finance Corp., according to the county resolution.
“This is a fantastic concept,” Wilson said. “It is something we are all very excited about.”
Although Wilson said he recognized the joint venture is seeking use of a county-owned asset, he would not provide more information than what was in the resolution.
“We would be happy to discuss all the details on the development as soon as the county commissioners have voted,” he said.
In 2007, the Housing Trust Group built Green Cay Village, a 400-unit community in Delray Beach with condominium units and townhomes that were for sale and rent. It was Palm Beach County’s first affordable housing development marketed to teachers, police officers and other public service jobs, according to the project Web site.
The Housing Trust also developed Malibu Bay, a 264-unit rental apartment building in West Palm Beach. The project, which was completed in 2005, was developed on a former golf course that had been declared a brownfield.

http://www.bizjournals.com/southflorida/stories/2008/11/03/daily73.html
 

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lower west side

That should probably go on the Overtown, Wynwood or possibly Performance Arts District threads because the Upper East Side is well east of N Miami Ave not to mention about 40 blks north starting at 55st.
 

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