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SiCKO is Moore's latest film, to be released in theatres on June 29.........however, it's already available on the internet almost as if it were a perfect DVD version of it. Download it in the link below:

http://u2r2h.blogspot.com/2007/06/download-sicko-new-movie-by-michael.html

It's really worth watching, amazing film.






Sicko Compares French Canadian British and Cuban Health Care Systems To The United State – Insurance Companies Profits Issue

Posted by Lynn Davidson on May 21, 2007 - 17:03.

The Michael Moore movie “Sicko” has not even hit the theaters yet but there is a lot of buzz concerning the film. This movie is not about the uninsured problem. This movie is about the problems faced by people with insurance. Moore chronicled the problems faced by people who have insurance.

Both energy and health care costs have been outstripping inflation. According to the National Coalition on Health Care (NCHC), Americans spend $2 trillion on health care per year. That works out to about $6,700 per person in the country. In total that is 16 percent of our GDP.

Although no system is perfect, Moore contrasted the US for profit health care system with socialized systems in Canada, the United Kingdom, France and even Cuba. The movie highlights several points and includes some interviews with former insurance company employees who discuss methods used by their employers to increasing profits by denying claims.

One case involved a woman who paid her premiums, but when she needed the insurance the company found that she did not report a yeast infection and denied her claim. Preexisting conditions are a common complaint concerning the US health care system. In this instance the insurance company had already paid the claim but then demanded the money back from her doctors.

Although everyone Moore interviewed in the movie expressed satisfaction with their socialized system, there are some problems. The NCHC reports that countries who have implemented this type of system have experienced delays with elective or non-critical procedures. In fact, 41.2 percent of Britons reported waiting more than 12 weeks between seeing a specialist and receiving surgical care.

The Canadians provide universal health coverage. Most doctors are private practitioners who are paid on a fee-for-service basis. Some physicians who work in a community health care center may be paid a salary. Over 95% of the hospitals in Canada are private non-profit operations. See what others are saying and join the discussion at our Forum

New residents in British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick must wait 3 months before qualifying for the provincial health plan. The Canadian health plan is paid for in taxes. There are no deductibles, co-payments or dollar limits on coverage for medically necessary services. Some provinces also cover prescription drugs.

But there are some problems with the Canadian system. Two thirds of those polled said their families had to wait longer for medical service than previous years. In 2004 doctors asked for a 30 percent increase in fees. At that time Alberta threatened to pull out of the Canadian program to provide care on their own.

The French provide health care to all residents who have lived in the country for at least three months. In the year 2000 the French introduced the CMU (couverture maladie universelle) which covers everyone that was not covered by their securite sociale. Households with less than 6,609 euros per year get free coverage.

There are fees involved to see physician in France, and these fees may vary according to type of doctor and the time of day. Fees are typically higher on Sunday and at night. There are no referrals required to see a specialist. Although there are both private and public hospitals in France, most people choose doctors who work with the securite sociale.

Doctors who work on their own fee schedules are only reimbursed up to the standard securite sociale fee. The French government covers 70% of most health care costs, and 100% in case of costly or long-term ailments. Supplemental coverage can be bought separately.

Cuba spends a huge portion of their GDP on health care. They provide good care and even attract foreign patients from Eastern Europe and Latin America who receive decent care at a low price.

There is no panacea. Moore makes a good case for socialized medicine and does it by comparing it to our current system of profit insurance. None of those interviewed outside the US complained about waiting in emergency rooms or to see a doctor. They all seemed to be happy with their care in general. Even in the United States the taxpayer ends up picking up the bill for many of the uninsured, but those with insurance can be left out.




And the theatrical trailer for SiCKO:






Moore stashed Sicko in Canada to elude U.S. investigators
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 | 10:28 AM ET
CBC Arts

Filmmaker Michael Moore says he had to rush a copy of his new film Sicko into Canada just before travelling to the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year because he feared U.S. federal investigators would seize it.

"I had to literally get a master of my film brought to Canada here so it could be safely placed in a country that would not violate my civil liberties," Moore said in an interview with CBC Radio.

"Why as an American would I have to ship my movie to Canada to protect it?" he asked.

Sicko won acclaim when it premiered at Cannes earlier this year.

U.S. investigators are looking into a trip to Cuba Moore made while filming Sicko. Moore took 9/11 rescue workers, who had been cut off medical coverage in the U.S., to Cuba to see if they could be treated there.

"We, according to them, violated the trade embargo, which means we went down there and conducted business — made this film — and the film now has value that was obtained while we were making part of it in Cuba," Moore said.

"So they may claim … they can confiscate my movie. I'm living with a real threat of that over the next few weeks."

Sicko, which compares the U.S. medical system with medicare in Canada, Britain and France, is due to open in commercial cinemas June 29.

Moore was in London, Ont., last week to premiere the film, saying he has family ties in the area.

His attorneys say the Bush administration may be trying to prosecute Moore over breaking the Cuban trade embargo because he was critical of the government in his film Fahrenheit 9/11.

"I am concerned that Mr. Moore has been selected for discriminatory treatment by your office," Moore’s attorney, David Boies, said in a letter to the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control.

Moore told CBC Radio he was surprised the federal prosecution began now, just ahead of the release of the film, when it was guaranteed to generate the most buzz for his documentary.

Moore also criticized the law that prohibits U.S. citizens from travelling to Cuba.

"Part of living in free country means you can travel freely, anywhere you want to go; that's what you can do as Canadians," he said.

Saying he thinks American "jaws are going to drop" when they see the health care other people enjoy, Moore said he doesn't portray Canadian health care as perfect in Sicko.

"My job is to show that Canadians — not so much have the best health care system in the world, which it isn't — but rather that Canadians have a core value belief that says, we're all Canadians, we're all in the same boat, we sink or swim together and we have to take care of each other," he said.

"It doesn't matter if you are a conservative or a liberal here, but that's what you believe and I wish we were more like that."
 

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"My job is to show that Canadians — not so much have the best health care system in the world, which it isn't — but rather that Canadians have a core value belief that says, we're all Canadians, we're all in the same boat, we sink or swim together and we have to take care of each other," he said.

That is essentially the nail being hit on the head....the major difference between the USA and Canada has always been the collective thinking at the core.

In the USA, the basic thinking has always been "ME"...and let everyone else worry about themselves. Here, we believe in giving everyone the same personal opportunities, but with the very important added benefit of certain basic minimum standards for everyone at the same time. The whole, is only as good as the parts.

This whole notion of the US government STILL having this attitude regarding Cuba is bizzare to say the least.




KGB
 

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Whenever an American drones on about higher taxes in Canada, I encourage him to tack on 4 or $500 bucks a month to his tax bill, as that is what he or his company pays for his Blue Cross type health insurance. If his company pays it, then that is money he does not receive for wages.
 

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Oh, it goes well beyond that...we make out like bandits compared to Americans in areas like capital gains taxes on your principal residence and RRSP contributions. And for those gamblers, lottery ticket buyers and game show contestants...all "winnings" are tax free here.




KGB
 

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"In the USA, the basic thinking has always been "ME"...and let everyone else worry about themselves. Here, we believe in giving everyone the same personal opportunities, but with the very important added benefit of certain basic minimum standards for everyone at the same time. The whole, is only as good as the parts."

And yet, Americans give more to charity than Canadians and are on average more philanthropic than Canadians. And this is basically (unrelated to health care) why their arts scenes are so much better funded and sustainable.

American culture isn't all about "ME". Get real.
 

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Yeah, the American government also pays more per capita into Medicare than the Canadian governments do into their respective Medicare systems, so you can't say Americans are all "Me me me". Canadians are, as we all know, greedy selfish bastards, always have been.
 

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"In the USA, the basic thinking has always been "ME"...and let everyone else worry about themselves. Here, we believe in giving everyone the same personal opportunities, but with the very important added benefit of certain basic minimum standards for everyone at the same time. The whole, is only as good as the parts."

And yet, Americans give more to charity than Canadians and are on average more philanthropic than Canadians. And this is basically (unrelated to health care) why their arts scenes are so much better funded and sustainable.

American culture isn't all about "ME". Get real.
There is a difference between "charity", and a basic respect for health care for the general community. Don't confuse getting a massive tax break for donating your Renoir to the Metropolitan, with giving health care to poor people. Besides, philanthropists (in Toronto at least) are finally stepping up to the plate.. slowly. Ironically, Americans wind up spending more on their health system, not less, but they don't like to add up the hidden costs of insurance companies, etc...
in general I find Americans are quite generous... I don't understand their belligerent opposition to helping someone less fortunate than themselves when it comes to health care.
 

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You would think Canadians of all people would understand that American states have a great deal of power in regards to things like welfare and health care, and that in a country with more than 300 million people, a single unified health care system controlled by the federal government might be just a tad bit unwieldy compared to Canada's system.

I believe several states have plans for extending coverage to all residents (Oregon, Hawaii, Massachusetts come to mind).


And if Micheal Moore is your go-to guy for understanding the United States of America, I got some great real estate deals in northeastern Siberia I'd love to talk to you about.
 

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And yet, Americans give more to charity than Canadians and are on average more philanthropic than Canadians. And this is basically (unrelated to health care) why their arts scenes are so much better funded and sustainable.

Well, as reality shows us, leaving the collective well-being of a nation up to "charity", is only as good as the tax write-offs attached to them. The current state of affairs should support the idea that the proof is often in the pudding.

And I'm not sure what your definition of the "arts" is, but in the USA, it generally means commercialized, corporate sponsered "art". Art for the sake of art is generally never the priority.

I will agree that your military is superbly funded. Like the "arts", and "health", that too is for the purpose of big business.


American culture isn't all about "ME". Get real.
Oh right...you are such a selfless lot...must be why if you aren't shooting eachother, you are sueing each other at an astonishing rate.

Why don't you get real...whether it's 1776 or 2007, the collective attitude of the USA has been to serve the needs of the few at the expense of the many. The only thing that keeps the have-nots from revolution, is that "American Dream" of becoming one of the few as well.

It's a very vicious circle, which is why it has been going on since the begining of the nation. Bad habits die hard. Canada on the other hand, has been very fundementally different since it's begining, which is why it is easy for us to maintain it.




Yeah, the American government also pays more per capita into Medicare than the Canadian governments do into their respective Medicare systems, so you can't say Americans are all "Me me me".

Yes...you are correct about one thing...they do pay more per capita. But look at where all that money goes...it isn't for "care"...it's all eaten up by the companies involved in the incredibly inneficient way in which they manage the system. Again, the "sick" are mearly another source of exploitation by the corporations.

You need to protect the greater population from being exploited by corporations on basic things like health care. A nation that cares about "everyone" will make sure that happens by legislating it...not by leaving it up to the "generousity" of the rich.




Canadians are, as we all know, greedy selfish bastards, always have been.

If by that comment, you mean "humans" are greedy, selfich bastards, then I guess in a general sense, I would agree with you. But the measure of a civilized society, is how you come to the realization that "my" well being, is best served in the big picture by how well "all" of us are. This is a lesson Canada has historically been better at learning than the USA has.





You would think Canadians of all people would understand that American states have a great deal of power in regards to things like welfare and health care, and that in a country with more than 300 million people, a single unified health care system controlled by the federal government might be just a tad bit unwieldy compared to Canada's system.

Dude...a little research would tell you that Canada's health care system is provincially funded and managed.





if Micheal Moore is your go-to guy for understanding the United States of America, I got some great real estate deals in northeastern Siberia I'd love to talk to you about.

As we can see, we know a hell of a lot more about you than you know about us (understatement). You probably know as much about Canada as you do about the Siberian real estate market.

Re: Moore...we don't learn anything from him. I think you fail to realize that his target market is Americans, not Canadians....therefore you get the simplified and condensed, dumbed-down version....as usuqal.

I don't quite know why so many Americans go off the deep end about Moore...it's not like he's handing you line of pure BS like your government or corporations do....most of the content of his "documentaries" (loose term here) are quite truthful and bang-on. I just think a lot of Americans just don't like the implications, and go into a massive collective state of denial rather face the fact it may be true.

But in the end, while I'm sure Moore has some inkling of genuine concern for the well-being of America somewhere in there and is a bit of an activist....he is a comedian/film maker/entertainer...and his motives are to as successful as possible at it....he is after all.....American. he he






KGB
 

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And if Micheal Moore is your go-to guy for understanding the United States of America, I got some great real estate deals in northeastern Siberia I'd love to talk to you about.
Michael Moore is only one tiny source of information about the United States. We are swamped by media information, being so close to your country. Moore, however, offers an alternative to the bulk of the information we receive... he does not agree with the officially sanctioned view that we might get from most American networks. Matt Lauer is unlikely to tell us some of the things that we might hear from Michael Moore.
 

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Americans are too patriotic to even admit all the wrong things in their country, especially when those things are pointed out by foreigners they will go to great lenghts to show they are right at all costs :eek:hno: After all isn't their favorite motto god, family and the nation :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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what I find stupid is how doctors are elevated to the ranks of Lords in the USA (and to a lesser extent here too)... they command salaries of over 600k a year south of the border and above 300k+ over here and get more powers than they can take at once which bring costs way up for everything.

While in 'retarded' countries such as France, Germany, etc. Doctors recieve much more reasonnable salaries and alot of practices that they do over here are relegated to nurses in Europe to free up doctors.

Those wages and the importance given to doctors are a good reason the system in the states cost much more than in europe, and in europe they have better services generaly.
 

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As we can see, we know a hell of a lot more about you than you know about us (understatement).
KGB
Well there are 10 times as many of us as there are of you. Lots more to know.

If we knew 1/10 as much regarding Canada as you know about America, things would be pretty much equal, nest-ce pas?
 

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Well there are 10 times as many of us as there are of you. Lots more to know.

If we knew 1/10 as much regarding Canada as you know about America, things would be pretty much equal, nest-ce pas?
So Indian and Chinese people know 3times more about your country than you do? is that what you are saying?

Population means nothing to knowledge.
 

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Exactly, Nigeria is one of the most populous countries in the world, yet their literacy rate is almost as low as Mississippi's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Exactly, Nigeria is one of the most populous countries in the world, yet their literacy rate is almost as low as Mississippi's.
i didn't believe it when u said it, so i had to look it up for myself....and holy crap.

Nigeria — Literacy (Total Population): 68%
Mississipi - 70%
 

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Well... Be careful about what you believe in... A while ago, Michael Moore admitted that his last film, Fahrenheit 9/11 he lied alot about it during one of his interviews. In my opinions, he can do whatever he wants to say because it is FREE SPEECH. I like the way he did that made many people including me think of something that we usually don't think about. I don't always agree with what he said but I understand where he came from. I thank him for making me THINK and do my own research. I hope his next mission will be about how evil Wal-Mart stores are.
 

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i didn't believe it when u said it, so i had to look it up for myself....and holy crap.

Nigeria — Literacy (Total Population): 68%
Mississipi - 70%
Holy ****! I just ball parked that! :banana:

Seriously though, America needs to work on becoming a first world nation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Well... Be careful about what you believe in... A while ago, Michael Moore admitted that his last film, Fahrenheit 9/11 he lied alot about it during one of his interviews. In my opinions, he can do whatever he wants to say because it is FREE SPEECH. I like the way he did that made many people including me think of something that we usually don't think about. I don't always agree with what he said but I understand where he came from. I thank him for making me THINK and do my own research. I hope his next mission will be about how evil Wal-Mart stores are.
well i don't believe either that Moore's films are 100% honest, however they are generally correct. America was psychologically devastated following 9/11 and its citizens believed in anything their government told them....thus why we have the War in Iraq and why "socialist" has all of a sudden gained a new meaning: evil enemy. I never thought all the stuff he said about Bush and his oil buddies were 100% accurate, perhaps partially.

But this new film of his, Sicko, hits it dead on. It's not 100% accurate but the point of the film is that there's something very wrong with American healthcare, how it is abused by corporations for profit and how millions don't have access to it or go bankrupt because of its ridiculous cost [even though they are insured], and the general attitude of American society: "ME not WE". It paints a relatively accurate picture of the healthcare systems in Canada, Britain, France, and the UK.....except that he is wrong about Canada not having long-waits and i find it laughable how he interviewed ONE French middle-class family (the scene where he goes into their home and sees how a average middle-class family copes with the nation's high taxes).
 
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