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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Despite a sluggish economy, Midwest casino markets have continued to increase overall revenue.
Six casino markets in the Midwest currently rank in the US top 20 per gross receipts, according to 2006 statistics from the American Gaming Association:

1 Las Vegas Strip $6.689 billion
2 Atlantic City, NJ $5.508 billion
3 Chicagoland $2.595 billion
4 Connecticut $1.734 billion
5 Detroit, MI $1.303 billion
6 Tunica/Lula, MS $1.252 billion
7 St. Louis, MO/IL $990.98 million
8 Reno/Sparks, NV $939.50 million
9 Boulder Strip, NV $929.70 million
10 Shreveport, LA $847.18 million
11 Biloxi, MS $845.20 million
12 Lawrenceburg/Rising Sun/Elizabeth/Vevay, IN $795.13 million
13 Kansas City/St Joseph, MO $751.33 million
14 New Orleans, LA $696.47 million
15 Lake Charles, LA $656.85 million
16 Downtown Las Vegas $630.29 million
17 Laughlin, NV $629.76 million
18 Black Hawk, CO $554.48 million
19 Council Bluffs, IA $477.96 million
20 Charles Town, WV $448.23 million

Last summer, the new Four Winds Casino Resort opened in Southwest Michigan, near the Indiana border. The casino reportedly draws a lot of business from Chicagoland.

In November 2007, Detroit added a fourth casino to its market, MotorCity Casino, complete with a 400-room hotel.

Last year, St Louis became the seventh US market to surpass the $1 billion mark in gross receipts. In December 2007, the St Louis market opened its sixth casino (Lumiere). A seventh casino is currently under construction.
 

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I was on another forum where this was discussed, but it should be made note of that the "Chicagoland" definition for this list includes, it seems, most of the state Illinois and parts beyond. Meanwhile, they split the Las Vegas market into three seperate areas.
 

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Cory
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Add my hometown to this list starting tomorrow! Hoosier Park Racetrack will open their new casino in Anderson, Indiana on Monday.
 

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King of Flyover Country
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Strange how #12 doesn't say "Cincinnati market" as it's in Cincinnati's MSA and is marketed towards the area.
 

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^Maybe it's in a different consumer market? The DMA of Cincinnati is actually smaller than the MSA, which is probably explained by the fact the MSA sprawls an absurd 15 counties. Cincinnati is the only market in Ohio like that. Cleveland, Columbus, Toledo, and Dayton all have larger DMA's than MSA's. Cincinnati's market is smaller than the "metro", and maybe it now excludes a couple towns in its Indiana area? That's the only possibility I can think of. Or maybe just fewer people own TV's in the Cincinnati market than other markets, which would explain why it has fewer television homes than Columbus despite having a larger MSA?

Either way, it is weird. I'd imagine the backbone of their customers come from Nati and its suburbia.
 

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Does anyone know what the state totals are? I'm just curious because I had heard Indiana was the second highest after Neveda. I'd be kind of shocked if that were true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Does anyone know what the state totals are? I'm just curious because I had heard Indiana was the second highest after Neveda. I'd be kind of shocked if that were true.
I have that info. Numbers include revenue from commercial casinos and racetrack casinos only:

1. Nevada- $12.622 billion
2. New Jersey- $5.219 billion
3. Louisiana- $2.942 billion
4. Indiana- $2.577 billion
5. Mississippi- $2.570 billion
6. Illinois- $1.924 billion
7. Connecticut- $1.734 billion
8. Missouri- $1.592 billion
9. Iowa- $1.572 billion
10. Michigan- $1.303 billion
 

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In November 2007, Detroit added a fourth casino to its market, MotorCity Casino, complete with a 400-room hotel.
Not true. The Detroit casinos are the same three they've always been: MGM Grand, Motor City, and Greektown. Perhaps they're confusing their new expansions/buildings, or adding in the nearby casino in Windsor, Canada.

I'm surprised to see Atlantic City ranked so highly. I always assumed Atlantic City was comparable to the small casinos they have in downtown Las Vegas, but apparently there's almost as much gambling there as on the Las Vegas strip.
 

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King of Flyover Country
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Keep in mind, Atlantic City is near a 22 million metro, a 6.4 million metro, and awfully close to DC/Baltimore.
 

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Why is the WHOLE state of Connecticut considered one market yet use metro's as markets for other places. I know Connecticut is a small state but it does have several seperate markets inside it's state.
 

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If you read my post, I wonder aloud why the "Chicagoland" designation incldues (from what I've heard) almost all of Illinois and parts of riverlands bordering the state, or why Vegas (geographically smaller than a lot of these areas) is split into the 3 areas? There is a lot of strange things about the top list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
^The best answer I can give for this is:

In the Vegas metro area, there are three major casino areas. Downtown Las Vegas (the Fremont Street area), Boulder City (near Hoover Dam), and of course The Strip (which is not within the city limits of Las Vegas.) These distinct areas rank #16, #9, and #1 respectively. They are competing markets, so they are monitored separately.

The Chicagoland market lacks distinct casino areas, or groupings. Most Chicagoland casinos are scattered in suburbs such as Joliet, Aurora, Gary, Hammond, and East Chicago. To my knowledge, none of these cities have more than two casinos each. So the "spirit of competition" that exists between major gambling areas does not exist here, as it does in the Vegas area.
However, as the Chicagoland market continues to grow, it seems possible that a new Gary-Hammond-East Chicago market area could be carved away from Illinois. Of course, if this happened, Chicagoland may not be able to retain its #3 ranking.
 

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I wonder what Detroit's numbers would be if they added Casino Windsor to the total. Would it surpass Connecticut? I also wonder how many Casinos are in each of these "markets" and how the per unit average would be sorted.

It's amazing that in just a few short years Detroit and its 4 casinos (incuding Casino Windsor) could arguably be one of the Top 4 casino markets in the country.
 

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Not quite. Casino Windsor raked in $320 million in the 2006-2007 fisal year, down by about $120 million.

I think this year could go either way for them, though. On one hand you have them opening their expanded facility, but on the other you still have an unfavorable exchange rate, greater border hassels, and the smoking ban. And despite popular belief, a declining economy does mean fewer potential gamers.

BTW, I've read that upwards of 80% of Casino Windsor's customers are American, so I'd definitely include it in our market.
 

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Yep, NW Indiana is a big gambling center. Then again, so is So. Indiana along the Ohio River. I would like to see Indy open a couple of casinos in the future.
 

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Is Indiana one of those states were non-Native American casinos have to be water-based?
 

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According to the AGA, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio are the only Midwestern states that do not allow "tribal" gaming. Iowa, South Dakota, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan are the only states with "commercial" gaming. Of those, only South Dakota, Iowa and Michigan allow land-based commercial gaming. The only Midwestern state that does not have any kind of casino gambling is Ohio.
 
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