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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Show us 'then and now' photos of developments that completely changed your city's neighborhoods. The easiest way to do this is by going to Google Street View. In the top left corner, click on the clock symbol and select the year you want to show. Upload your screenshots to imgur and post them here!

Here are a few from Minneapolis 2009 - 2017

Downtown, Nicollet Mall
Several several blocks of surface parking transformed into a mix of highrise residential, office and retail. The new developments essentially extended Nicollet Mall three blocks north:



East Town, Vikings Stadium
Formerly known by the locals as a surface parking wasterland, the neighborhood has been regenerated with construction of the $1 bln Vikings Stadium, the new Wells Fargo campus and new apartment midrises:




Stadium Village
This neighborhood is a popular hangout for U of M students. In recent years it has seen a lot of development centered primarily around the Green Line light rail. The latest addition is a modern 20-story apartment tower:



Uptown
Uptown had already been a popular shopping and restaurant destination, but it saw an extra development boost in the last decade:

 

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Off-topic, but if anyone wants me to show them how to do it, there's a way to get all the little doodads off of those Google street map images (that is, the "Google" logo at the bottom-center, the + and - arrows, the thing at the top-left, etc). The only thing that can't be removed is the street names on the streets, but if you angle the picture the right way it goes away anyway.

Also, if you use Lite mode you get fewer of those doodads anyway, plus the photo doesn't have this fish-eye-lens look to it.
 

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Unfortunately, the Lite mode does not support historical imagery. At least not that I'm aware of..
You can "cheat" and get historical imagery by first viewing an image in full mode, then click on the "Lite Mode" icon. It saves the image you're viewing, even if it's an old one. It even saves that set of old photos when you use the Lite Mode's arrows to go up and down a street.

However, once you click back to the map or aerial view, it goes back to whatever the default view is, which of course is the most recent photo.
 

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Mod edit: Please do not turn this thread into a KC-vs-other cities thread. The entire south loop (10 sq blocks) was developed from abandoned surface lots into the Power & Light District, one of the premier urban Districts in the US. Another tower (Three Light) should start soon and Four Light, a residential/hotel tower should start within a year.













 

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More Columbus, Ohio

E. 1st Avenue 2007- Italian Village, Jeffrey Place

2017


N. High and Russell 2011, Short North (just some of the many projects)

2017


N. High and Lane 2007, OSU Campus

2017


Some of the neighborhood infill.

Yard Street, Grandview Yard 2011

2017


Mt. Vernon Avenue, King-Lincoln, 2009

2017


Parson and Livingston, Near South Side 2009

2016


Dale Drive, Dublin/Columbus border, Bridge Park 2015

2017
 

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lagom
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Columbus has grown and changed so much over the past 20 years. I moved up here from Orlando in 1999 and downtown Columbus was a crumbling, souless, shithole. I have moved in and out of the city over tha past 2 decades and came back for good about 2 years ago and am blown away at the number of infill projects going on inside and outside the inner belt. It's an exciting time to live here and watch the buildings go up.
I love it here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Between 2014-2018, Downtown Minneapolis has seen several formerly underutilized blocks filled with new highrises. Another future development, a 30 to 40 story mixed-use tower known as the Gateway, will eventually bookend Nicollet Mall from the north extending the vibrant urban street by several blocks:


2012:
Minneapolis_Friday Night by Mr. Moment, on Flickr


2018:
Crisp March Morning in Downtown Minneapolis by Groveland Media, on Flickr

The Gateway development:
 

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Love the scale and design of the Columbus developments. The city has gained a lot of new character.
I've had the good fortune of visiting Columbus a couple times on day trips ( from my father's house) over the last couple years. Not only the sheer amount, but the good quality of the infill is what impressed me. A lot of the new buildings take their cues from the older architectural vernacular of the city yet reinterpret them in a contemporary way that gives the urban fabric a nice sense of being a continuum. :)
 

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lagom
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I've had the good fortune of visiting Columbus a couple times on day trips ( from my father's house) over the last couple years. Not only the sheer amount, but the good quality of the infill is what impressed me. A lot of the new buildings take their cues from the older architectural vernacular of the city yet reinterpret them in a contemporary way that gives the urban fabric a nice sense of being a continuum. :)
I can say the same thing about Minneapolis as well! I started just road tripping to Minneapolis when I moved to Oklahoma in the early 2000's and it's now become a vacation spot for me and my gateway to the North Shore. The infill is mindblowing and constant. Each year when I return to Minneapolis there is something new to see.
 

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^^The next few years will be very exciting in Minneapolis! We will have four 30+ story buildings going up (which includes both a 39 and 40 story residential tower). Additionally, one 26 story apartment tower under construction with two more planned. Not too shabby for a city in the middle of the prairie! :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Actually, all of southwest metro area used to be the tallgrass prairie. You can still see patches of it scattered along Minnesota river.
 

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Small pockets of the metro were once tallgrass prairie, yes. But Minneapolis (and the Twin Cities metro as a whole) now sits in what was originally the Big Woods (hardwood deciduous forest).



The wide open tallgrass prairie of folklore (think Little House on the Prairie) doesn't start until well beyond the western metro. And unfortunately, basically none of it exists anymore because widescale farming permanently destroyed it.
 
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