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Minnesota Population Continues to Grow




Minnesota's population is expected to grow nearly 20 percent by 2030, far outstripping the near-stagnant growth predicted in the rest of the Upper Midwest, according to the latest Census Bureau projections.

"This is a remarkable place, especially when you factor in that we don't have the warmest climate or the most convenient location," said State Demographer Tom Gillaspy.

Minnesota was projected to grow to 6.3 million people in 25 years, a 17.9 percent increase over the current projected population of 5.17 million. By contrast, Iowa and South Dakota are to shrink while Wisconsin shows a 10 percent gain.

County-level projections released last week showed continued strong growth in the Twin Cities metro-area, which was expected to continue spreading toward St. Cloud to the northwest, Rochester to the southeast and Wisconsin to the east.

Gillaspy said the metro area has been exceptional during the past decade for its ability to attract people from both outside the country and outside the state. He said the outsiders were attracted by jobs.

It's hard to say for sure why all those people stay in the state, but Gillaspy said he's seen one common thread to the answers he gets when he asks the question. "The answer that people keep giving me is this focus on education," he said.

It appears that well-educated people with children are attracted to the state's strong public education system and tend to put down roots. That in turn leads to high incomes, economic growth and the benefits.

He noted the growth is in the Twin Cities. "The growth is highly concentrated in that area," he said. "You get beyond that and you sort of fall off the edge of the world in terms of growth."

Parts of southern and western Minnesota look more like the depopulating upper Plains states, where most of a generation of young people have left for better jobs elsewhere.

"A lot of those Iowans have gone to Minnesota," he said. "We are enjoying some of the fruits of the education system of Iowa, thank you very much. There are some wonderful people moving here."

The latest projections also include predictions of how the population will age. For example, about 12 percent of Minnesota's current population is 65 years or older. By 2030, 19 percent will be.

It means that more communities in the state will soon look like those Plains counties to the south and west, which already have high percentages of their populations over retirement age.

Gillaspy said when he speaks to groups in the metro area, they tend to chuckle when he tells them about life in some Minnesota counties where the population is quickly aging and deaths outpace births every year.

"There are some counties in the state where the biggest challenge is how to deliver Meals on Wheels to the 90-somethings down on the farm when all the drivers are in their 70s," he said.

Still, Minnesota will fare better than other states. North Dakota, for example, in 2030 will have one in four residents 65 or older.

Nationally, the Census projections show Florida, California and Texas will account for 46 percent of the nation's population growth between 2000 and 2030, with each gaining more than 12 million residents. Florida will supplant New York as the nation's third-largest state, behind California and Texas.

Arizona and North Carolina should gain enough residents to join the nation's 10 most populous states, the Census projects, replacing Michigan and New Jersey.

The highest population growth, 88 percent, is projected in the South and West, according to the Census.

By Chris Williams, Associated Press Writer

Projected Population Growth by State
State 2005 2010 2020 2030 Pct. Change
Minnesota 5,174,743 5,420,636 5,900,769 6,306,130 17.9
Wisconsin 5,554,343 5,727,426 6,004,954 6,150,764 9.7
Michigan 10,207,421 10,428,683 10,695,993 10,694,172 4.6
Iowa 2,973,700 3,009,907 3,020,496 2,955,172 -0.6
South Dakota 771,803 786,399 801,939 800,462 3.6
North Dakota 635,468 636,623 630,112 606,566 -4.8



(Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
 

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Minnesota- I think it might grow faster, if Twin Cities has a good decade of economic prosperity it might carry it well about above it. Minneapolis is an economic powerhouse (albeit a boring one).

Wisconsin- That seems about right...North Wisconsin will lose, but Milwaukee and Madison will gain large amounts of people

Michigan- Yeah, 5 percent growth seems about right as well

Iowa- I think it will actually grow alot of momentum in that state especially Des Moines

South Dakota- Sioux Falls will have to grow alot, but its a prosperous small city and the tax structure is very favorable

North Dakota- They have brought it on themselves...They play hard to get..even the rural residents and this is what happens. Honestly arrogant people, low pay, extreme conservatism, nothing too offer I think they might lose more than the prediction says honestly.
 

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Badgers77 said:
Far-off population projections are too hard to do. There are simply too many unforseen factors.
And in fact I don't believe they have ever been right when it comes to projecting midwest population trends. I remember in the mid 80s they were projecting that Wisconsin and Iowa were going to start dropping in population by the mid 90s and Minnesota was only going to have small to only modest gains.

Even year to year estimates are a problem in some cases. The last official estimate on the city of Milwaukee done before the 2000 census showed Milwaukee was only 586,000 and by census time would be hovering around 580,000. Yet the 2000 census proved it was 596,000. That's a pretty big margin of error if people are going to use estimates done by the census bureau to gage anything, don't you think?
 

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I was thinking the same thing, i.e., about the difficulties that inhere in long-term projections. Not that I'm unhappy to see that MN is expected to grow, but I can't help wondering how these projections are made. How can the Census Bureau predict what people will do in the next 25 years?
 

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They think and reserach, thats what they are paid to do, beside the census years. Poor ND, losing that many people. Good for minnesota I think? Might even surpass Wisconsin soon. 2 red states replaceing 2 blue states in the top 10?
 

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Azn_chi_boi said:
They think and reserach, thats what they are paid to do, beside the census years.
Too bad they're hardly ever right...Kind of tells you who is doing the thinking doesn't it? Government paid workers, LOL! :)

I mean, if I remember correctly, they even were saying the Chicago CSA was suppose to be loseing people by now. Could it be census people in the 70s and 80s thought Chicagoans would be moving to the great white north? LOL, now there's a good question. Anyway, answer me this, do you see a shrinkage of population in the Chicago area Azn_chi_boi? If not then that means the census bureau was wrong in their predictions? Were they useing faulty data? no, not at all. All data at that time showed Chicago and Milwaukee and in fact Illinois and Wisconsin loseing population. The thing is...something else came up to change the predicted data!
Good for minnesota I think? Might even surpass Wisconsin soon.
Maybe some day they will but even if you go off the census bureau's estimates, they say it wont happen till the year 2030. Seeing that I will be at the age of 67 when that happens I would hardly say it's going to happen "soon", but most importantly I hope and pray that at that age I wont really give a shit IF it does. :)

Let's just try and keep in mind that Minnesota can't suck all the population out of the Dakotas, Iowa, and Wisconsin. Since that is where Minnesota is mainly recieveing their transplants I would have to say that there is a limit to the amount of flow.

Or do you really believe that a high percentage of people moving to Minnesota now are fron the south or from out west?

2 red states replaceing 2 blue states in the top 10?
Dear Azn_chi_boi, in the year 2030 all the blue states could be red then and all the red states could be blue at that time. I would say odds are against that ever happening but this is America and anything can happen.

The major point being that the year 2030 is not soon on our horizon. Politicaly and socialy this country can change drasticly either way in that amount of time and because population movement is effected by both these causes, among plenty others, it makes no sense to take stock in any prediction on what we all will be doing 25 years from now. Quite frankly, 25 years from now might as well be labeled Ozland for all I care but then again that's just me, I'm a different sort of cat. Maybe you all are right that things will remain the same 25 years from now but I say chances are and history shows they wont.
 

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denverretard1982 said:
Minnesota- I think it might grow faster, if Twin Cities has a good decade of economic prosperity it might carry it well about above it. Minneapolis is an economic powerhouse (albeit a boring one).
Minneapolis boring? I just returned from Denver and now I remember why I moved. Denver has to be one of the biggest white trash cities in the country. It still hasn't lost its "cowtown" image and the city is boring; much more than Minneapolis.
 

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^ You're telling me to settle? Aren't you the freak who sends people private messages when you don't agree with them?

Anyway. My response wasn't an overreaction to her comments. Not quite. In her opinion, Minneapolis is boring. In my opinion, Denver is a white trash, cowtown. She has never lived in Minneapolis. I've lived in both so, I think I know what I'm talking about.
 

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twincities03 said:
Minneapolis boring? I just returned from Denver and now I remember why I moved. Denver has to be one of the biggest white trash cities in the country. It still hasn't lost its "cowtown" image and the city is boring; much more than Minneapolis.
Denver is 49% white
Minneapolis is 61% white
How can you call Denver a white trash cowtown when your town Minneapolis is more white then Denver? I mean yeah Denver isnt as diverse as alot of metro's but neither is Minneapolis besides the somali community.

Besides Denver is a cowtown, small town and a international city and resort all in one. So I agree with you.

Minneapolis has an excellent economy, but lets face the music its a very, very boring metropolitan area for having 3 million people.
 

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denvernative1982 said:
Minneapolis has an excellent economy, but lets face the music its a very, very boring metropolitan area for having 3 million people.
What makes it "very, very boring"?

I know you're a younger guy still in college, so I'd bet that I've been more places than you.

Hmmm, let's see. I've been to Chicago, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, New York, Hartford, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Baltimore, Washington DC, Tampa, Orlando, Las Vegas, San Diego, and Los Angeles. Some of those cities more than once. Next week I get to go to San Francisco for the first time.

Anyway, obviously some of those cities are more exciting than others. I feel like I've seen a pretty good variety of cities, and for it's size, I don't feel like Minneapolis is overly boring. I think you and that Badger dork have serious bugs up your asses about Minneapolis. It's just too good, and that pisses you off. And I love it. :)
 

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what is with this guy? Milwaukee is pretty good..as Im sure MSP is. I dont know what you expect from cities like these...no city in the Midwest is going to be like Las Vegas, LA, or Miami. Being 18...I havent fully experienced Milwaukee nightlife sadly..but from what I hear--the bar scene is amazing.
 

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For Bigger Cities, I've been to Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Boston, Miami, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Austin (I have Family in Austin), Minneapolis briefly, Detroit... I've fairly well travelled for being 20. Although I didn't "hit the town" in many of the cities.

Chicago has a huge, booming night life, as does Boston. I really love Boston.

When you get back tell me if San Francisco is the most touristy place you've ever been to. I loved the city, but I have never been in a city that felt so toursity before. I just went last month, and I ran into at least 5 other people from Wisconsin.

San Francisco just felt very surreal to me. It was a very funky feeling city.
 

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I've never been to Vegas. San Francisco just felt insanely touristy to me- and much more internationally than Miami. I swear I heard 10+ different languages while around Fishermans Wharf alone.
 

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denvernative1982 said:
Denver is 49% white
Minneapolis is 61% white
How can you call Denver a white trash cowtown when your town Minneapolis is more white then Denver?
LOL! Just because one city has a larger white population than another doesn't mean it has more white trash. You're not the sharpest tool in the shed are ya.

denvernative1982 said:
I mean yeah Denver isnt as diverse as alot of metro's but neither is Minneapolis besides the somali community.
You forgot the Hmong, Mexican, Liberian, Ethiopian, Chinese, Native American, etc...

denvernative1982 said:
Besides Denver is a cowtown, small town and a international city and resort all in one. So I agree with you.
Denver is not an international city moron.

denvernative1982 said:
Minneapolis has an excellent economy, but lets face the music its a very, very boring metropolitan area for having 3 million people.
LOL! You've lived in Denver and have visited Omaha and maybe the Twin Cities. Sorry bro, but that doesn't make you an expert when it comes to entertainment. Are you even old enough to get into bars?
 
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