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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Mombasa region is the low hanging nugget lever that Kenya has refused to pull towards accelerated growth.

Independent Kenya has been run from Nairobi creating a fallacy in policy that has alluded Kenya economic planners to the growth plan magic hidden in port cities;
The policy making has been based on building infrastructure that connects the port with the interior, where large masses of people live. This policy assumes that the residents in the interior are immobile so as justifying the need to build infrastructure that comes to them.
If the Kenyan government makes conscious effort to create jobs in Mombasa Metropolitan region people would migrate in droves from the interior creating a new mega city in the coastline.
The main advantage is that the government would eliminate the need to build expensive infrastructures to the interior and all that is needed is a string of good towns alongside the coastline. In this approach costs of imported goods would be consumed at their minimum prices near their port of entry.
Kenya has been dragging its feet on creating assembly zones in Mombasa, Making use of Fiber Optics, export EPZ,s like those in China and other natural port industries.
The biggest cities of the world, ie Beijing, Hong Kong, New York, London, Mumbai, Cairo, San Francisco, Lagos, Sydney... are all port cities it is not a coincidence.
Two big cities will double Kenya's productivity. Service delivery will be greatly improved. It is relatively easy to nurture Mombasa to a mega city status to be as big as or even bigger than Nairobi.

How can we deal with ethnic politics: Once the land issues is resolved 5 years of consistent jobs creation and migration the resulting population will be diverse and pretty much cosmopolitan.

How can this be achieved:
1. Land reforms, Dishing out titles and resolving all the thorny land issues that has plagued coastal natives since 1963. This implies all local house household to get a title preferably 4 acres each. This would resolve the perceived land issues once and for all.
2. Creating by passes, and investment zones like those envisioned in Naivasha and resort cities as envisioned in Isiolo
3. Building Mwache dam to ensure adequate water
4. Accelerating the building Dongo Kundu bypass
6. Building a cruise ship harbor
7. Enrolling capital from Oil rich Arab countries, Brits, German, Italians, Americans who have been tourists in Mombasa for decades. the Chinese have big appetite.
8. Subsistence fishing will only increase poverty
9. Can People move from interior? Yes if people can move to Nairobi they would easily move to Mombasa in masses. Mombasa is a place of dreams for many Kenyan's

watch this clip


10: Likoni ferry is a disaster waiting to happen so Dongo Kundu bypass is a long overdue project
11: Ship building industry can be enlarged Kenya to create opportunities for the unemployed youth
12: The port has crossed over to the South Coast, with Base titanium shipping minerals from the south coast side of the port and both Mtongwe and the Likoni ferry docking on that side of the channel debunks the myth that Mombasa port has ran out of space. This shows that the channel has twice the capacity that utilized today

13. What is needed from Uhuru is leadership that would midwife transformation as far as Mombasa Metropolitan Region is concerned. Investors, and others will lift the bulk.
 

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i always wish nairobi was mombasa, i wonder why mombasa is still a small city yet its among africas oldest cities. something really has to be done there. mombasa should be having developments and investments at per with nairobi
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Other low hanging fruits.

1. Mrima hills rare earth
2. Pwani university can easily be grown to be like Nairobi University (creating a job eco system)
3. Cashew nut factory
4. Mango processing plant
5. Cement manufacturing
6. Beaches
7. Local shipping firms (incentivizing clearing companies to expand country's influence in sea transport)
 

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thenairobidude
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Entertainment (Nightlife, Movies, Music) if someone was smart they would push for the creation of a film hub in Mombasa. The city, beach and old town are perfect places for movies.

All beaches in Mombasa should have a promenade to promote pedestrianisation and all beaches should be public. We cant have our citizens cramming at pirates while foreigners enjoy everything. Tourists have come to experience Kenya they should experience Kenya with common people. A promenade across all beaches will solve that, it will also promote more businesses camel riding, pizza places and restaurants etc.

Transport industry (shipping, aviation)
 

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These are superb ideas but also put this into consideration
The biggest cities of the world, ie Beijing, Hong Kong, New York, London, Mumbai, Cairo, San Francisco, Lagos, Sydney... are all port cities it is not a coincidence.
Malindi sits on the mouth of Galana river, has the world's most beautiful beach(Watamu), not limited by geography(area) or ethnicity or land issue and much more hence it would make a better port city
How can we deal with ethnic politics: Once the land issues is resolved 5 years of consistent jobs creation and migration the resulting population will be diverse and pretty much cosmopolitan.
Beyond politics superstition also keeps many upcountry Kenyans out of Mombasa
Land reforms, Dishing out titles and resolving all the thorny land issues that has plagued coastal natives since 1963. This implies all local house household to get a title preferably 4 acres each. This would resolve the perceived land issues once and for all.
This would only take place if Mombasa embraced non locals as leaders since it's all about politics
Can People move from interior? Yes if people can move to Nairobi they would easily move to Mombasa in masses. Mombasa is a place of dreams for many Kenyan's.
In Kenya ethnicity determines migration, even in Nairobi people cluster around their tribesmen so how many are willing to move out of their comfort zone and become what John Miles called "a stranger in the city"
Likoni ferry docking on that side of the channel debunks the myth that Mombasa port has ran out of space. This shows that the channel has twice the capacity that utilized today.
There is space of course which is shallow in terms of depth while better port can be set up in Shimoni-Vanga to the south and Lamu to the north
 

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thenairobidude
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^^
The port idea at Shimoni-Vanga has been on the table for a while. I remember KPA saying they'll setup ports in every coastal county. That probably also covers a port a Malindi.

I think Kwale, Kilifi and Mombasa Counties should be designated as Mombasa Metropolitan. They can then work to have integrated urban transport etc. An urban investment and tourism plan should be worked on the 3 jointly as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes: Mombasa Metropolitan should be a combination of Kwale, Kilifi, Mombasa Counties, working as one big region.

My logic is based on expanding a node that already exists it is easier than creating a new one all together.

I agree on your views on superstition

It is okay for locals to vote for natives now, as population increases due to migration, just like in Nairobi the new migrants will increase the pool of adopted locals and the politics will change

Even in the United States clustering of people is unavoidable. in big cities whites cluster in the same neighborhoods, blacks the same, Spanish, Cambodian...
 

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New factory for mombasa
Wednesday
July 13, 2016

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KenolKobil to build Sh1.4bn lubricant plant in Mombasa
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KenolKobil managing director David Ohana. PHOTO | FILE

KenolKobil managing director David Ohana. PHOTO | FILE
By NEVILLE OTUKI, [email protected]

Posted Tuesday, May 19 2015 at 20:05

In Summary

KenolKobil plans to build Sh985.8m service stations this year in plans to strengthen its non-oil business line.

KenolKobil will set up a Sh1.4 billion factory in Mombasa for production of its Castrol-branded lubricants as the firm eyes tax savings to boost its bottom line.
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The oil marketer said on Tuesday the financing of the plant would be through a joint venture with oil major BP Southern Africa, which is the owner of Castrol lubes.

The two firms on Tuesday signed a deal giving KenolKobil exclusive distribution rights for Castrol lubricants, ending a tussle that had seen BP attempt to repossess the brand from Kenol and award it to its former partner Shell.

“We will set up a new blending plant in Mombasa in the next one or two years at a cost of between $10 million (Sh958 million) and $15 million (Sh1.4 billion),” said KenolKobil managing director David Ohana at the signing of the agreement in Nairobi.

Lubricants are blended from base oils, a refinery product, and infused with additives.

KenolKobil has another smaller lubes plant in Kenya with a monthly production capacity of 600 tonnes for its own lubes. The planned unit will have a monthly capacity of 1,000 tonnes of lubes in what is set to intensify competition in the local petroleum sub-sector.

READ: KenolKobil signs deal with BP to supply Castrol lubricants

KenolKobil currently imports the Castrol lubricants from South Africa, which attracts an import duty of 25 per cent.

The oil marketer is seeking to import only inputs that attract 10 per cent duty for local blending, critical in cutting costs.

Lubricants, a by-product of oil, are used in reducing friction in machines, mostly in automotive, industrial, fishing, racing, mining and aviation industries.

Unlike motor petrol and diesel, its prices are not controlled by the Energy Regulatory Commission and analysts reckon that the products offer high profit margins.

KenolKobil, which is Kenya’s third-largest oil dealer by market share after Total and Shell, will sell the Castrol brand in Kenya only despite having a footprint in Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia.

The Nairobi Securities Exchange-listed firm said on Tuesday it would re-launch Castrol brands in the next two months, in a rejuvenated marketing campaign.

The deal with BP will potentially strengthen Kenol’s financial health with the firm having been on a rebound from a record Sh6.3 billion loss reported in 2012.

Kenol returned to profitability in the year ended December 2013, with a positive bottom line of Sh558.4 million. In the period to December 2014, the marketer reported a net profit of Sh1 billion.

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Discussion Starter #11
Kaimenyi issues 27,000 title deeds in Taita Taveta in State plan to end Coast land woes

Kaimenyi issues 27,000 title deeds in Taita Taveta in State plan to end Coast land woes
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By BRIAN OCHARO

Posted Thursday, July 14 2016 at 17:47
Land Cabinet Secretary Jacob Kaimenyi has issued 27,000 title deeds in Taita Taveta in what he says is the government’s effort to resolve the thorny land problem at the Coast.

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Prof Kaimenyi expressed confidence that the government would keep its pledge to issue three million title deeds.

“As government, we are committed to make your lives better, we want to fix this problem permanently,” he said on Wednesday when he handed over the ownership documents to Kitobo residents.

The latest issuance means the government is left with less than 700,000 land documents to meet its three million target. Landlessness has long being a big problem at the Coast with several indigenous commuters forced to become squatters.

Prof Kaimenyi said the his ministry will assess options to settle the squatters and fix the problem permanently.

“And now that you have titles, we will weigh options of settling squatters and also issue them with their titles ,” he said.

He however noted with concern that some people were reluctant to pick the documents, saying that more than 7,000 titles are laying uncollected at Land offices.

“It is sad that while others are really looking forward to have these documents, others are reluctant in picking them. We hope that owners of the uncollected titles are yet to come for them,” he said.

Prof Kaimenyi was accompanied by Taita Taveta Deputy Governor Mary Ndiga and County Commissioner Josephine Olunga, who witnessed the issuance of the land documents.

The residents said they has waited long for the crucial documents.

They expressed optimism that their lives would change for the better because the land ownership documents can be used as securities to access loans for their development plans.

Ms Selina Nyambu, a beneficiary said she planned to head to her local bank for a loan.

“ I am very much delighted to hold this document because I am now confirmed as the bonafide owner of my piece of land. With this crucial paper I can now access financial opportunities,” she said.

The woman said she was confident that her children could now be the recognised owners of the piece of land even after she dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Kenya needs a coastal city




B]World Bank values Dar’s real estate Sh273bn more than Nairobi[/B]

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Aerial view of Nairobi (left) and Dar es Salaam: A World Bank report estimates the economic value of Dar’s real estate at Sh1.2 trillion ($12 billion) ahead of Nairobi’s Sh927 billion ($9 billion) – a Sh273 billion gap. PHOTOS | FILE

By NEVILLE OTUKI, [email protected]

Posted Friday, February 10 2017 at 09:59
IN SUMMARY
Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa comes in third at $6 billion (Sh618 billion), while Kigali (Rwanda) is fourth at $2 billion.
Uganda and Burundi were not included in the study.
The World Bank report, however, describes Dar, Addis and Nairobi as having low economic/replacement values compared to cities with similar income levels.
Tanzanian capital Dar es Salaam’s real estate has been ranked ahead of Nairobi and Addis Ababa in the World Bank’s latest cities report, which cites land fragmentation and weak property rights as the sector’s biggest impediments in Africa.

Real estate sector cools down ahead of August elections

The report, which was released yesterday, estimates the economic value of Dar’s real estate at Sh1.2 trillion ($12 billion) ahead of Nairobi’s Sh927 billion ($9 billion) – a Sh273 billion gap.

Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa comes in third at $6 billion (Sh618 billion), while Kigali (Rwanda) is fourth at $2 billion. Uganda and Burundi were not included in the study.

The World Bank report, however, describes Dar, Addis and Nairobi as having low economic/replacement values compared to cities with similar income levels.

“The low economic value comes from the way land is organised – in small fragments – reducing the scope to scale up investment in housing and commercial complexes. Small scale urban development increases cost of construction and makes it costly to lay down supporting services and infrastructure,” Somik Lall of the World Bank said, adding that there is need to clarify property rights – “because in many parts of Nairobi, land is not utilised to its full potential.”

The report also urges Nairobi and Dar to co-ordinate land and transport development in order to create value.

“As you will see in cities such as Nairobi, the share of land allocated for mobility – is limited. This further reduces the extent to which the city can support economically dense structures.”

In Nairobi, for instance, commercial and industrial structures account for 55 per cent of the total value of building stock — even though these structures occupy just four percent of the city’s area.”

“Residential development is urgently lacking,” it says, adding to a growing chorus on Kenya’s housing deficit of about 200,000 units annually.

Property development has more recently been seen as a safe investment bet in Kenya, making it a popular cash-generating option for investors.

This is evidenced by the numerous giant cranes on the city’s commercial districts such as Upper Hill and Westlands.

Property experts yesterday acknowledged that office space charges are higher in Dar at an average of $22 per square metre compared to Nairobi’s $12 – $14.

READ: Real estate sector cools down ahead of August elections

ALSO READ: What makes Nairobi the only African city in global investors top five watchlist

Nairobi "more lucrative"
They, however, said that rents have been falling in Dar even as growth remains steady in Nairobi, making the Kenyan capital more lucrative in terms of return on investment.

“Honestly, we are struggling to sell space in Dar. So based on a long-term view, Nairobi’s capital value will be higher,” said Ben Woodhams, the managing director of Knight Frank – a property firm with a footprint in Kenya and Tanzania.

“At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how much it costs to construct a building but how much returns it generates,” he added.

The World Bank report, however, says Nairobi has the highest replacement value for its built-up area and built-floor area ahead of Dar, Addis Ababa and Kigali, even as it lags the global standards.

“Our analysis of imagery from satellites and geographic information systems (GIS) confirms that in African cities, capital investment not only appears low near the urban core, but rapidly declines outside it.”

Mr Woodhams said property markets in Dar and Nairobi tell of different stories since the majority of new buildings in Tanzania are government-funded while Kenya’s is private sector-driven.

He said that the swanky public buildings in Dar are likely to generate near zero-returns in the near term since they are occupied by parastatals and government departments, meaning Dar is expected to record a drop in capital value should the lull in the private sector activity persist.

The shine on Kenya’s property market has in recent years pulled in multinationals in droves, especially Chinese firms that now dominate the construction sector.

Chinese investment firm Avic International is, for instance, constructing a Sh9.6 billion complex in Westlands, comprising a 35-floor five-star hotel, apartments and 43-floor office blocks.

Besides, Indian tycoon Mukesh Ambani has a big presence in Kenya through his local company Delta Corporation East Africa.

The firm has recently developed the Iconic Delta Corner twin towers in Westlands and another tower in Upper Hill that it sold to the World Bank.

“The urbanisation of people has not been accompanied by the urbanisation of capital. This manifests itself into cities not being able to fully tap into their economic potential. We use various metrics to make this point, including some new analysis based on calculating the replacement value of building stock in the city,” the study says.

The World Bank purchased Delta Centre from Mr Ambani to host its Kenyan offices at a cost of $22.8 million (Sh2.3 billion) while consultancy firm PwC bought one part of the Westlands towers.

Multi-billion shilling Garden City Mall, which opened its doors in 2015 on Nairobi’s Thika Road, is owned by British investment firm Actis.

Investment firm Centum will open Two Rivers Development on February 14, a multi-billion shilling real estate project in Kiambu that is designed to host the largest shopping mall in the region.
Two Rivers, which comprises a shopping mall, hotel, office blocks and apartments, sits on a 102-acre piece of land on Limuru Road in Kenya’s capital city.

Also in the top end of commercial real estate market is Dubai-based real estate company Abcon International LLC, which plans to build a Sh5.52 billion towering complex in Nairobi comprising a shopping mall, office block and a hotel modelled on Singapore’s Iconic Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

The 35-storey skyscraper will be located in Nairobi’s commercial district of Upper Hill. The mixed-use development will also feature luxury apartments and an amphitheatre.

Kenya’s property market has boomed in recent years, catching the eye of deep-pocketed foreign developers from China, India, Britain and United Arab Emirates.
 

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I don't believe that report's findings about value of real estate in Nairobi and Dar. Been there lived there and the new buildings do not really add that significant difference because Nairobi hasn't been sleeping either. We've been upto something too.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Most global cities are coastal towns
1. New York
2. New Orleans,
3. Miami,
4. Guangzhou
5. Shanghai, China
6. Singapore
7. Los Angeles
8. Rotterdam
9. Instanbul
10. Hong Kong
11. Mumbai
12. Ho chi Minh
13. Dubai
14. Valencia
15. Jeddah
16. Lagos
17. Tel Aviv
18. Tallin
19. San Diego
20. Boston
21. Marseille
22. Perth
23. Durban
24. St Petersburg
25. Venice
26. London
27. Dublin
28. Stockholm
29. Helsinki
30. Oslo
31. Kuala Lampur
32. Jakarta
33. Manila
34. Taipei
35. Tokyo
36. Osaka
37. Dar
38. Cape Town
39.Doula
40. Abidjan
41. Accra
42. Casablanca
43. Tripoli
44. Tunis
45. Lisbon
46. Monaco
47. Miami
48. Panama
49. Lima
50. Bueno Aires
51. Rio de Janeiro
52. Salvador
53. Caracas
54. George Town
55. Havana
56. Houston
57. San Francisco
58. Vancouver
59. Beijing
60. Nagoya
61. Sapporo
62. Manila
63. Colombo
64. Sydney
65. Maputo
66. Luanda
67. Mogadishu
68. Libreville
69. Lome
70. Monrovia
71. Dakar
72. Algiers
73. Rabat
74. Jerusalem
75. Athens
76. Naples
77. Barcelona
78. Antwerp
79. Hague
80. South Hampton
81. Amsterdam
82. Hamburg
83. Riga
84. Copen hagen
85. Oslo
86. Bergen
....
Among these giants is our one and only one Mombasa

Mombasa Metropolitan Region

Mombasa Metropolitan region is a cosmopolitan with Swahili, Kamba, Taita, Luo, Luhya, Kikuyu, Kisii, Kalenjin, Maasai, Makonde, Digo, Giriama, Indians, Whites, Somalis, Arabs... a mini reflection of Nairobi.

It has potential of being as big as Nairobi, Planners should be tasked on what they can do to develop a World class Metropolis in this region
 

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Most global cities are coastal towns
1. New York
2. New Orleans,
3. Miami,
4. Guangzhou
5. Shanghai, China
6. Singapore
7. Los Angeles
8. Rotterdam
9. Instanbul
10. Hong Kong
11. Mumbai
12. Ho chi Minh
13. Dubai
14. Valencia
15. Jeddah
16. Lagos
17. Tel Aviv
18. Tallin
19. San Diego
20. Boston
21. Marseille
22. Perth
23. Durban
24. St Petersburg
25. Venice
26. London
27. Dublin
28. Stockholm
29. Helsinki
30. Oslo
31. Kuala Lampur
32. Jakarta
33. Manila
34. Taipei
35. Tokyo
36. Osaka
37. Dar
38. Cape Town
39.Doula
40. Abidjan
41. Accra
42. Casablanca
43. Tripoli
44. Tunis
45. Lisbon
46. Monaco
47. Miami
48. Panama
49. Lima
50. Bueno Aires
51. Rio de Janeiro
52. Salvador
53. Caracas
54. George Town
55. Havana
56. Houston
57. San Francisco
58. Vancouver
59. Beijing
60. Nagoya
61. Sapporo
62. Manila
63. Colombo
64. Sydney
65. Maputo
66. Luanda
67. Mogadishu
68. Libreville
69. Lome
70. Monrovia
71. Dakar
72. Algiers
73. Rabat
74. Jerusalem
75. Athens
76. Naples
77. Barcelona
78. Antwerp
79. Hague
80. South Hampton
81. Amsterdam
82. Hamburg
83. Riga
84. Copen hagen
85. Oslo
86. Bergen
....
Among these giants is our one and only one Mombasa

Mombasa Metropolitan Region

Mombasa Metropolitan region is a cosmopolitan with Swahili, Kamba, Taita, Luo, Luhya, Kikuyu, Kisii, Kalenjin, Maasai, Makonde, Digo, Giriama, Indians, Whites, Somalis, Arabs... a mini reflection of Nairobi.

It has potential of being as big as Nairobi, Planners should be tasked on what they can do to develop a World class Metropolis in this region

TRUE. IF THEY CAN HASTEN SEZ (DONGO KUNDU), ELEVATE A BRIDGE AT LIKONI, DO THE ROADS TO WORLD CLASS, PUT UP AN INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE, SCALE UP HYGIENE, there will be no reason not to close in with our rival cities.
 

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That Boston land reclamation effort occurred in the 17th and 18th centuries when environmental planning and regulatory oversight were basically non-existent. Any landfill effort that goes on in Mombasa does not need to be that expansive, and would def. need to pay special attention to the local ecosystem esp. the mangrove swamps. We all know how much Makupa Causeway's construction blocked the movement of water and by proxy devastated fish population in that part of the island.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
China Wu Yi acquires Sh530m Kilifi land
TUESDAY, JULY 4, 2017 19:32
MR QIU LIANGXIN (LEFT) THE MANAGING DIRECTOR CHINA WU YI WITH MOMBASA DEPUTY GOVERNOR HAZEL KATANA (CENTER) TOGETHER WITH MR YANG YUE, THE PRESIDENT OF FU ZHOU CITY IN CHINA IN THIS PICTURE TAKEN ON MARCH 14, 2016. MR QIU LIANGXIN (LEFT) THE MANAGING DIRECTOR CHINA WU YI WITH MOMBASA DEPUTY GOVERNOR HAZEL KATANA (CENTER) TOGETHER WITH MR YANG YUE, THE PRESIDENT OF FU ZHOU CITY IN CHINA IN THIS PICTURE TAKEN ON MARCH 14, 2016.
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Chinese conglomerate China Wu Yi is set to buy a 20-acre land in Kilifi County at a cost of Sh530 million, signalling the company’s intention to expand its manufacture of construction materials locally.
The multinational, in a statement, said it had authorised its local subsidiary China Wu Yi Kenya Park Investment & Development Co to purchase the land.
The planned investment in the property was not immediately clear but sources indicate the company could be planning to produce iron and steel at the site.
Acquisition of the land comes soon after China Wu Yi started the construction of a Sh10 billion housing materials plant in Athi River, with the local investments coming after the multinational bagged major private and public sector construction tenders.
The Athi River plant is expected to be completed this year, producing pre-cast construction materials that will also be sold to other construction firms. The multinational is putting up the plant through its locally incorporated subsidiary China Wu Yi Precast (Kenya) Company Limited.
READ: Ownership of China Wu Yi’s Kenya arm thrown into doubt
The project, on 30 acres land off Mombasa Road, will include a pre-cast elements plant, a display area, warehouse and a construction material supermarket which will introduce construction materials from China effectively making it a one-stop shop for construction materials in the country.
The supermarket will stock stones, ceramic tiles, bathroom appliances, construction electrical, lamps, and kitchen furniture among others.
 
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