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美国: Rep KE
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Many improvements, expansions and acquisitions are taking place in the port of Mombasa in an ongoing process please post your discussions and news.
 

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美国: Rep KE
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[B]Kenya considers major Mombasa port development [/B]

Kenyan Transport Minister Ali Chirau Mwakwere said a study had been commissioned to assess the feasibility of such a port and its possible location, reports African Business Daily of Nairobi. Acting Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) chief James Mulewa said the establishment of a second port means commercial cargo would be directed there to reduce congestion at Mombasa's main Kilindini harbour.

Mr Mulewa met port users to explain how the organisation plans to deal with the congestion problem. Cargo traffic at the port, the gateway to East Africa, increased by 21 per cent last year to 15.9 million tonnes.

"We are updating the authority's master plan to ensure that port development is in tandem with the exponential growth in the region," said Mr Mulewa. Among the measures KPA has introduced to reduce congestion is introduction of 24 hour operations and allowing port users to establish private container depots in the coastal town.

The minister, Mr Mwakwere, has directed the KPA to auction 8,000 containers that have not been cleared from the port. He says that KPA has started the expansion of the port to accommodate the extra cargo following the approval by Parliament of a sessional paper which allowed Treasury to guarantee a KES16.8 billion (US$239.3 million) loan to KPA.
The money made available by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) will be used to expand the port to enable it handle two million containers annually, from the current 600,000 containers.

KPA intends to use a total of KES23 billion to build a new container terminal near Kipevu Oil Terminal. Treasury allocated KES430 million for the expansion project in its June budget. The first phase of the expansion of the port will be ready in five years while the final phase will end in 2015.

Importers say the construction of a three-phase second container terminal at the port is key to accommodating major international businesses. Shippers have complained of delay in being allocated berths for docking, thereby delaying off-loading of cargo. And cargo owners have in the past complained of container loss or tampering due to rudimentary ways of cargo handling. KPA intended to expand the port by establishing three new deep water berths for bigger ships.

Source : Shipping Gazette
 

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real gooner
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MOMBASA | 2nd Container Terminal | Under Construction (Complete: 2013)

Privatisation of Mombasa Port has started in earnest, signaling better services are on the way.Last week, the Privatisation Commission of Kenya led a team of consultants on a tour of the port to view facilities owned by the Kenya Ports Authority.
The Government aims to privatise berths 11 to 14, stevedoring services and Eldoret Inland Container Depot.
Port Executive Director Solomon Kitungu said the team’s mandate include evaluating the projects, identify potential investors and advise the Government on available options.
"They will also look at the possibility of establishing the berths as an independent and commercial functional unit from the rest of the port," Mr Kitungu said.
Increase efficiency
KPA Harbour Master Captain Twalib Khamis said the initiatives would increase efficiency and container capacity at the port.
"We also have a skilled workforce, efficient gang composition and strong union representation," Mr Khamis told The Standard.
Last Saturday, Dockworkers Union General-Secretary Simon Sang told a pecial conference for members that the union would discuss with Government the plan to privatise stevedoring services.
Mr Sang said stevedoring services were central to dockers and there should be consultation before being handed over to private operators.
"There is a threat from Government to privatise stevedoring. The union has not been consulted on this issue," he said.
KPA is building a second container terminal west of Kipevu with a 1.2 million 20ft equivalent units capacity. The Sh16 billion terminal will be completed by 2013 and will also be run by a private operator.
Berths 11 to 14 were originally designed to handle general cargo, but due to growth of containerised cargo, is being used to handle container vessels using the ships’ own gear.
KPA says Government intends to convert these berths into a fully-fledged container terminal with modern container handling equipment.
This requires physical restructuring of the berths, including strengthening of the quay.
The terminal will then be leased to a private operator, while KPA remains the landlord authority.
Proposals from local and international firms are expected before September 25, for Cabinet approval.
 

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real gooner
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Dock workers’ strike planned to protest privatisation of berths

An aerial view of some of the hundreds of containers at the port of Mombasa. The dock workers union claims privatisation of berth 11-14 to containerised cargo will lead to the loss of 4,000 jobs. Photo/FILE
By GITHUA KIHARA (email the author)



Posted Wednesday, October 21 2009 at 00:00

Key projects at the Mombasa port have been thrown into doubt by a planned dock workers strike to protest the privatisation of berths.

According to a recently unveiled revised master plan, the port authority needs Sh43 billion to complement private sector efforts to expand the ports capacity to enable it satisfy the rapidly growing cargo traffic as well as accommodate huge vessels presently in manufacture.

However, dock workers union (DWU) officials said the government is not keen on following the unveiled master plan and instead was in a rush to carry out piecemeal sale of some key sections of the port, prompted by the huge profit the authority made in the last financial year.

In the master plan, KPA was to seek a partner through credit for materials or other commercial loans on acceptable terms to redevelop berth 12-15.

In the event that the authority was unable to do this, it was then to consider the use of private funding for the development of these berths, most likely in the form of a 20-year Build Operate Transfer (BOT) concession as recommended in the master plan.

KPA was scheduled to probe the market for private finance later this year before finalising funding arrangements for the remainder of the master plan.

Private goodwill

Privatisation of berth 11-14 to containerised cargo will lead to a loss of 4,000 jobs according to the secretary general of DWU Mr Simon Sang, and will also result in overcapacity for containerised cargo as construction of a second container terminal is already underway.

The Free Trade Zone at Dongo Kundu is one of the projects that require private goodwill.

Bids for carrying out feasibility studies for a FTZ to be implemented through a private public partnership (PPP) have been invited.

This is a flagship project identified as part of Kenya’s Vision 2030.

Vision 2030 also identifies a PPP as the best option for implementing the Dongo Kundu project.

When fully developed, the FTZ is expected to comprise 6,200 individual sites housing 10,000 business units and facilities for warehousing, light industry and processing.

There will also be a residential area.

The master plan also recommends construction of a new access bridge to Mbaraki Wharf which is used for handling dusty cargo such as cement.

Mbaraki, together with berths 1-10 can provide enough capacity for dirty bulks up to 2022, according to the revised master plan.

http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/-/539444/674750/-/s0f5ns/-/index.html
 

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real gooner
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Mombasa port’s capacity to rise with a deeper channel

Kenya will start importing crude oil using large tankers with a capacity of a million barrels upon completion of dredging the navigation channel at the Port of Mombasa.

Petroleum Institute of East Africa (PIEA) said the government’s Sh16 billion Mombasa port expansion plan entailing ocean floor dredging will allow large tankers to dock.

PIEA chairman Felix Majekodunmi said the country will reap from economies of scale as it is cheaper to hire a big tanker to ferry a large quantity of crude oil and imported refined petroleum products.

Freight costs

He said dredging will reduce freight costs considerably as Kenya currently spends a lot of money to import crude oil and refined fuel using small vessels ferrying a maximum of 80,000 metric tonnes.

Kenya Ports Authority has submitted to the National Environment Management Authority (Nema) an environmental impact assessment study report on dredging works aimed at accommodating new generation bigger vessels to increase Mombasa’s competitiveness.

Speaking during PIEA’s annual dinner on Monday Mr Majekodunmi said the industry recognises the government’s initiatives to expand the port, set up strategic fuel reserves and enhance capacity of oil products pipeline.

Director general Vision 2030 Mugo Kibati who was he guest speaker, said availability of affordable oil products and other sources of energy is critical for Kenya to attain the industrialisation status articulated in the blueprint.
 

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Mombasa port traffic rises

The port of Mombasa and East Africa’s main trade gateway handled 19.06 million tonnes last year, up from 16.41 million in the previous year, the port operator said in a report.

The container terminal handled 618,816 twenty-foot equivalent container units (TEU) last year, up slightly from 615,733 in 2008 although it was designed for 250,000 TEU.

Over a quarter of the total throughput, or 4.98 million tonnes, was transit cargo. Ugandan goods accounted for just under 80 per cent.

"These figures highlight the growing use of the port by the region and show signs of an improvement in regional economic performance," the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) said in its 2010-2011 handbook.

"KPA is forecasting continued growth for 2010 and 2011, albeit at a slower pace owing to the current economic conditions."

Trucks move more than 90 per cent of the transit cargo but Kenya and Uganda are planning to lay a 1,290-kilometre standard gauge track to supplement an existing metre gauge railway between Mombasa and Kampala.

KPA said Chinese and Korean firms had expressed interest in constructing the wider track.

Turnaround time improved to three days from five days in 2008 after the port adopted 24-hour work schedules and opened new container freight stations.

KPA said work on a second terminal with a 1.2 million TEU capacity began in 2009 and there were plans to convert existing berths into a third terminal.

The second terminal, whose first phase should be operational in 2013, will cost an estimated $235 million and will be financed by a Japan International Co-operation Agency loan.


"KPA has already decided that the second terminal should be operated by a concessionaire in some form of competition with the authority’s own container handling facility," KPA said.

KPA also hopes to dredge the port to a deeper 15 metres from 13 metres to enable bigger ships to call at the port. The Mombasa port also serves Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, south Sudan, eastern DRC and Somalia.

Aid agencies also use it for food aid. It handled a million tonnes of aid cargo last year, nearly double the amount of food discharged in 2007, KPA said. Food destined for Somalia took nearly 40 per cent.

Zambia, Ethiopia and Malawi were considering using the Mombasa port as a gateway for some overseas markets.
 

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Sh7 billion dredging to open up Mombasa port
Daily Nation
10 April 2010​
The process for dredging Mombasa port channel to accommodate huge vessels has started.

A wider channel will position the port for transshipment which faces a threat from other emerging African facilities.

Tenders to identify a firm that will carry out the process as well as assist in raising the Sh7 billion required for the project have been opened.

Six international firms which submitted their bids and technical capacity to carry out the task will be evaluated in the next one month, according to the tender committee.

China Road and Bridge Corporation of China, Oord Dredging and Marine Construction of Netherlands and Sino Hydro Corporation Ltd of China bid for the project.

Other firms include the Jana Nur Dredging International, Rohde Nielsen and Boskalis International BV.

Firms which will successfully go through the first stage will be invited for the next phase for the contract that is expected to be awarded by September this year.

“We shall involve more players that will include the Ministry of Finance during the next stage of evaluation,” said Mr Omae Nyarandi, procurement and supplies manager at Kenya Ports Authority (KPA), who led the opening exercise. He is also a member of the tendering committee.

Bidders were required to provide a tender security of $1 million with the firm that will win the contract expected to start work before the end of the year, Mr Nyarandi said, adding that the government has already provided Sh1 billion for the project.

“The requirement to provide security from a bank was supposed to ensure that we only receive bids from serious companies who have the capacity to do the job and lock out jokers,” he said.

Related projects

KPA postponed dredging last year until the planned construction of a second container terminal commenced. The two projects are related.

Construction of the second terminal and dredging of the channel are supposed to begin together because the material that would be scooped from the sea would be used to reclaim part of the land for the second terminal.

The port has lost a huge transshipment business over the last two years after suspending such operations due to capacity constraint at the container terminal against a background of growing cargo volumes than anticipated.

Shipping lines calling at Dar-es-Salaam port are seeking alternative sites due to long vessel delays which is taking up to three times more than Mombasa port, KPA operations manager engineer Joseph Atonga said.
 

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KPA: New port terminal on schedule

Detailed designs for the construction of a second container terminal at the Mombasa port will be ready next month, Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) has said.

“These designs will pave way for actual construction works for the new terminal, west of Kipevu at a total cost of Sh16 billion,” the port operator said in a statement.

The government plans to construct a second 1.2 million TUE capacity terminal to help match a steady increase of container traffic at the facility that serves Kenya and other countries in the hinterland such as Uganda and South Sudan as well as those in the Great Lakes Region.

The second terminal, whose first phase should be operational in 2013, will be financed by a Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA) loan.

“Kenya Ports Authority has witnessed increased growth in container traffic over the years hence the need to establish a second facility to meet the demand,” the port handler said while projecting further growth at the port this year as business activity across most world markets picked up on improved economic climate.

Despite poor global market conditions, overall throughput at the port of Mombasa grew by 16.1 per cent in 2009 to post the best ever performance of 19.06 million tonnes.

Container volumes throughput on the other hand reached 618,816 tonnes in 2009, nearly a 40 per cent increase in just five years while total freight handled by the port rose by over 10 per cent from 16.41 million tonnes in 2008 to 19.06 million tonnes in 2009.

Over a quarter of the total throughput, or 4.98 million tonnes, was transit cargo. Ugandan goods accounted for just under 80 per cent.

According to KPA the new facility will be operated by a private concessionaire-- a position that could help stir efficiency and competition.

In the loan deal with JICA, the main container terminal handling equipment such as ship-to-shore gantry cranes and rubber-tyred gantry cranes among others, will be provided by the Japanese.

Other facilities in the project include the extension of the rail line that currently serves the Mombasa container terminal, building of a new access road and installation of new buoys and markers in the maritime access channels.

“To cope with the continuing container growth before the second terminal enters service, Kenya Ports Authority also plans to upgrade and covert berths 11 to 14 to another container terminal and offer it on a concessionary basis to a private operator. Currently, ships use their own gear to load and offload containers,” the authority further said.

This additional capacity, KPA said, will help to attract transshipment traffic and act as a feeder point for Seychelles, Mauritius, Madagascar and Zanzibar.

“At the same time, an additional berth 19 will be constructed at the main container terminal to handle container vessels. KPA is in the tendering stage to dredge the channel and widen the turning basin to allow the latest generation of container ships,” the port handler said.
 

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美国: Rep KE
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Kenya: Construction on Mombasa Port in Progress

Posted on Apr 9th, 2010

Second 1.2 mln TEU terminal will start operating in 2013 and Port working 24-hrs, turnaround time improves. Kenya’s only deep water port and East Africa’s main trade gateway handled a total 19.06 million tonnes in 2009, up from 16.41 million in the previous year, the port operator said in a report. The container terminal handled 618,816 twenty foot equivalent container units in 2009, up slightly from 615,733 in 2008 although it was designed for 250,000 TEU. Over a quarter of the total throughput, or 4.98 million tonnes, was transit cargo. Ugandan goods accounted for just under 80 percent. “These figures highlight the growing use of the port by the region and show signs of an improvement in regional economic performance,” the Kenya Ports Authority said in its 2010-2011 handbook.

“KPA is forecasting continued growth for 2010 and 2011, albeit at a slower pace owing to the current economic conditions.” More than 90 percent of the transit cargo is moved by trucks but Kenya and Uganda are planning to lay a 1,290-kilometre standard gauge track to supplement an existing metre gauge railway between Mombasa and Kampala. KPA said Chinese and Korean firms had expressed interest in constructing the wider track.

Turnaround time improved to three days from five days in 2008 after the port adopted 24-hour work schedules and opened new container freight stations. KPA said work on a second terminal with a 1.2 million TEU capacity began in 2009 and there were plans to convert existing berths into a third terminal. The second terminal, whose first phase should be operational in 2013, will cost an estimated $235 million and will be financed by a Japan International Co-operation Agency loan. “KPA has already decided that the second terminal should be operated by a concessionaire in some form of competition with the authority’s own container handling facility,” KPA said. KPA also hopes to dredge the port to a deeper 15 metres from 13 metres to enable bigger ships to call at the port.

The Mombasa port also serves Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, south Sudan, eastern DRC and Somalia. Aid agencies also use it for food aid. It handled 1.0 million tonnes of aid cargo in 2009, nearly double the amount of food discharged in 2007, KPA said. Food destined for Somalia took nearly 40 percent. Zambia, Ethiopia and Malawi were considering using the Mombasa port as a gateway for some overseas markets.
Infor: http://www.dredgingtoday.com/2010/04/09/kenya-construction-on-mombasa-port-in-progress/
 

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Port eyes more capacity with deeper channel

Source
A Netherlands firm has won the tender to carry out the planned dredging of the Mombasa port channel, which maritime experts say will position it strategically as a regional trans-shipment hub.

The company, Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors, emerged the best in evaluations, beating three other firms which submitted bids in April this year. The government hopes to finalise talks with the firm soon.

“We are in the process of preparing the contract documents to be signed soon so that the dredging can start by next month or latest in January next year,” said the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) procurement manager Mr Yobesh Oyaro.

Do not see any hurdles
The four international firms submitted technical and financial proposals for evaluation early this year. Mr Oyaro said that all the firms’ technical proposals qualified for the task but the authority had to rely on financial submission to award the tender.

Firms were invited last year to submit their technical submissions, financial submissions and financing proposals for the project that will be funded by both the government and donors.

“Since it is now over 14 days since the tender was awarded, we do not anticipate any hurdles and the dredging will go on as planned,” said Mr Oyaro.

KPA postponed the exercise last year until the planned construction of a second container terminal commenced.

The setting up of the second terminal and dredging of the channel, whose design work is now complete, are supposed to commence together because material that will be scooped from the sea bed will be used to reclaim part of the land for the additional facility.

Lost some business
The second terminal is funded by Japan to the tune of Sh16 billion and will create an additional capacity of 1.2 million twenty foot equivalent units (Teus) compared to the existing capacity of 250,000 Teus.

The Mombasa port has already lost to Dar es Salaam port trans-shipment business in the last two years due to the container terminal constraints.

The port is already being stretched almost beyond its 20 million tonnes per year capacity.
 

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Still Comin' Out Strong
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Mombasa port has already surpassed its 20 million tonne capacity if it was near 19.1million tonnes in 2009. The expansion will double the ports capacity to 40 million tonnes?

Anyways, dredging was reported to have started in june and will be done in 18 months (well 16 months now)..
 

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Dredging by now has been completed but is the container terminal still u/c?
 

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aren't they going to go beyond Kilindini harbor?
 

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Trademark EA to invest Sh4.5bn on Mombasa port
Business Daily
8 October 2012​
Trademark East Africa (TMEA) is investing Sh4.5 billion ($ 53.05 million) over the next 5 years (2012 -2016) on improving the efficiency of the Mombasa port.

TMEA is proposing specific technical and grant support that would target both capacity and efficiency at the port.

The areas of support include port-wide productivity improvement study, improving rail linkages and space rationalisation within existing port land, improving yard facilities and stacking areas at berths and improving port access.

Mr David Leahy, a member of TMEA’s board of directors said TMEA estimates that by 2015 the Mombasa Port will need 40 per cent more ship-to-shore equipment, 230 per cent more quay space, and as much as 400 per cent more yard space.

TMEA last week receive a grant worth Sh1.2 billion from the government of Sweden to fund the activities of the organisation which targets to improve trade in the region.

TradeMark East Africa (TMEA) has also committed Sh1.7 billion ($ 21.3 million) to the Tanzania Port Authority (TPA) for work at Dar es Salaam Port. This represents over 29 per cent of TMEA’s current Tanzania program budget of US$ 73.5 million.

“In the longer term, the TMEA programme envisions improving land-use within the port environs, upgrading the existing facilities to allow larger and deeper draft vessels use berths 1-10 and berths 11-14, “extending the port gate to Miritini, relocating the liquid bulk berths, and changing the use and function of Mbaraki wharf,” said TMEA in a statement.

The organisation is also investing around Sh6 billion ($75m) in seven one stop border posts (OSBPs) across the region.

The aim of OSBPs is to reduce transit costs incurred in cross-border movement by combining the activities of both country’s border organizations and agencies at a single location in either direction.

Along the Northern Corridor is the construction of the Busia-Busia (Kenya/Uganda) and Kagitumba-Mirama Hills (Rwanda/Uganda) border crossings.

Others in the budget are the Taveta-Holili (Kenya-Tanzania), Mutukula-Mutukula (Tanzania/Uganda), Kobero-Kabanga (Burundi/Tanzania) Tunduma (Tanzania/Zambia) and Elegu/ Nimule (Uganda/South Sudan) border crossings across East Africa.
 
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