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There's thread about countries dominated by one city, so how about those where population is spread most evenly. Do you think polycentricity is better than centralization for a country or not?
 

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China, there are 33 provinces and each of them varies like European countries. Biggest is Guangdong province with 104 million and you got 20 of which has over 20 million people. All provinces have capitals which usually is the biggest city acting as a center and hub for the whole province or region.

If cities are really big then it's influence can span over several provinces in a region.
For example Chengdu is the center for Sichuan and is also a regional hub for south-western China.

Guangzhou and Shenzhen acts together in the Pearl River Delta as the capital or hub for southern China.

The introduction of Special Economic Zones since the 1980s have led to the development of several distinct regional economies within the People's Republic of China, such as the Pearl River Delta, Yangtze River Delta, and the Bohai Circle. Several of these regions have economies the size of developed nations. Some scholars who use the term United States of China argue that during the process of Chinese economic reform the People's Republic has evolved into a de-facto federal state in which these economic regions have wide discretion to implement policy goals which are set by the PRC central government and in which provinces and localities actively compete with each other in order to advance economically.
I would say that China is almost like if Europe were a country but double the population (excluding the political differences in Europe).
 

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Australia IMO.

Sydney and Melbourne have nearly similar city population, then in next tier there are Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

For a country of just above 20 million population, the decentralization of Australia is quite amazing.
 

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Mind Reader
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China, India comes close as the second.

GDP wise: Shanghai= 3.08% of China

Mumbai = 5% of India


Population wise: Shanghai = 1.72% of China

Mumbai = 1.5% of India
 

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Mind Reader
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Do you think polycentricity is better than centralization for a country or not?
Hard to say better or worse, but i find most centralized countries to be boring. The dominating city is certainly very impressive, what about the rest of the country?
 

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China, India comes close as the second.

GDP wise: Shanghai= 3.08% of China

Mumbai = 5% of India


Population wise: Shanghai = 1.72% of China

Mumbai = 1.5% of India

But, China and India are huge populous nations. which cannot be compared to countries like Australia

Take certain Indian states:

Karnataka ( 61 million population )- Bangalore dominates
Tamil Nadu ( 65 million population ) - Chennai dominates
West Bengal ( 85 mil population ) - Kolkata dominates
Maharashtra ( 112 mil population )- Mumbai dominates .. Pune is also important but its far relatively smaller than Mumbai

In comparison, Australia ( 20 million population ) has quite many important & global cities i.e. Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane & Adelaide
 

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Mind Reader
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Australia?

GDP wise, Sydney is almost 25% of the country.


Take certain Indian states:

Karnataka ( 61 million population )- Bangalore dominates
Tamil Nadu ( 65 million population ) - Chennai dominates
West Bengal ( 85 mil population ) - Kolkata dominates
Maharashtra ( 112 mil population )- Mumbai dominates .. Pune is also important but its far relatively smaller than Mumbai
Like someone here says, you can't compare regions with countries.;)
 

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Australia?

GDP wise, Sydney is almost 25% of the country.


Like someone here says, you can't compare regions with countries.;)
But Hyderabad constitutes high % of Andhra Pradesh GDP
Chennai, Bangalore, Guangzhou, Fuzhou, Kolkata, Tianjin, Changchun, Lhasa, Urumqi etc also constitute high % of GDP of their respective state/province

To me the way to determine this is to count the number of "global/important cities" in each country, then divide by population number of entire country . Then, u get the number of important cities per 1 million/10 million population.
 

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Mind Reader
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But Hyderabad constitutes high % of Andhra Pradesh GDP
Chennai, Bangalore, Guangzhou, Fuzhou, Kolkata, Tianjin, Changchun, Lhasa, Urumqi etc also constitute high % of GDP of their respective state/province

To me the way to determine this is to count the number of "global/important cities" in each country, then divide by population number of entire country . Then, u get the number of important cities per 1 million/10 million population.
Weird comment. Guangdong is the worst example of a centralized state.

Of course there are mono-cored states in China or India, but as a whole both countries are ultra decentralized, that's hardly an arguable fact. Simply you can't have every state within a country polycentric.
 

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perthistan
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Australia is extremely decentralized with 5 major cities each in a different part of the continent, very similar to Canada.

Obviously the larger the amount of land that a country has the more chance it will be decentralized.
 

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Margela Schurkel
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It has advantages and disadvantages. In Germany you get a decent distribution of power and people, so every city get's the chance to excel on one area. The disadvantage is that we don't have a true big city that would be able to compete with the likes of New York, London or Tokyo.
 

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Germany is perhaps the most functionally decentralized large country, probably even more so than the U.S. Among smaller countries, the Netherlands and Switzerland are quite polycentric.

Australia is extremely decentralized with 5 major cities each in a different part of the continent, very similar to Canada.


I wouldn't call Canada extremely decentralized. Toronto seems to have emerged as Canada's undisputed global city and largest metro area.

Obviously the larger the amount of land that a country has the more chance it will be decentralized.
I'm not sure about that. In large but sparsely populated countries like Australia and Canada, people and business tend to be concentrated in a relatively small number of large cities.
 

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Margela Schurkel
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Germany is perhaps the most functionally decentralized large country, probably even more so than the U.S. Among smaller countries, the Netherlands and Switzerland are quite polycentric.





I wouldn't call Canada extremely decentralized. Toronto seems to have emerged as Canada's undisputed global city and largest metro area.



I'm not sure about that. In large but sparsely populated countries like Australia and Canada, people and business tend to be concentrated in a relatively small number of large cities.
In Switzerland, a heavy portion is concentrated in Zürich. Zürlich is double as big as the next metropolitan area, Geneva. If Zürich would also be the capital of Switzerland, it would resemble cities like London or Tokyo, that are dominant in their country but still challenged by rather powerful second cities.

The Netherlands appear decentralized, but in fact it is centralized decentrally. Functions are split to various cities, but they are all in one area, the Randstad.
 

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Mr.Br*gthside
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In South America the more descentralized countries are Venezuela, Colombia and Bolivia. In a second group would be Ecuador and Brazil, although the first one is largely dominated by 2 cities and the latter is highly concentrated in Sao Paulo state and the South East Region.

In the World I would say

1. Italy
2. USA
3. Germany
4. Australia
5. China



I think a good measurement, since the percentage of population concentrated in one city is bias due to extreme large population countries, would be the difference between the first and second city and the second and third city and the third and fouth city and so on. In both, population and GDP. If someone wants to do it for any country you are welcome to do so.
 

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Requiscat en pace
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South Africa is pretty decentralised as well

Johannesburg
Cape Town
Durban
Port Elizabeth
 

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Sebvill, I would think along similar lines as to some sort of equation. Possibly measure the gap between the top 3 cities and then the distance from 3 to say 6. I think the USA or India might come out on top.
 
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