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México
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So you want pretty? Berlin too edgy and gritty?

So you prefer a more Southern location for your European trips? Hamburg too Northern, with its Nordic red brick architecture?

Is Frankfurt too modern, American-looking, not European enough?

Well, then, go to Munich. It literally has everything you may want from a German city. True, it's not as cool as Berlin, but it's not as traditional as it used to be, and its newer, trendy side will surprise you. Its museums include some of the best collections in Europe. And unlike any other large German city, it has a relaxed, Southern, almost Mediterranean vibe. Its colourful baroque palaces and churches give it an exhuberant, eye-catchy character. It is the home of one of the world's largest festivals, the Oktoberfest, so it is fun. And post-war reconstruction has arguable been the most successful of any of the largest German cities.

So, let's take a look at some aspects of the central area of town! :banana:

Like many European old cities, Munich was surrounded by a protective wall, and several gates survive. Unless you stay in the actual old town, you will likely enter the center through one of its gates. Let's go in through Karlstor (Carl's Gate), visible from Karlsplatz.









Just on the square, towards the main central station, the Palace of Justice.



















And right at the gate, typical old city stuff awaits...






And the pedestrianized Neuhauser Street will take us to Marienplatz, Munich's central square.























This orange building is the former Burger's Hall, which was turned into a church when it was consecrated with an altar.




















The second church on Neuhauser Street is impossible to miss. St Michael's Church, a huge white, baroque structure.



































Some more images from the immediate area...









The heart of the square is the City Hall (actually the New City hall, the Old City hall is much smaller and also here on the square). Notice the monk, symbol of the city (and which the city is named after).




















Walking North of Marienplatz along the pedestrian streets...











Walking North of the Marienplatz you will make it to Odeonsplatz, with its Italian renaissance-style Hall of Heroes. The huge Residenz palace complex just to the side.











The other huge building on Odeonsplatz is the huge Teathinerkirche (actually, St Kajetan), the largest Jesuit temple North of the Alps. Indeed, it was the first baroque church built in Italian style after the Counter Reformation.























Just behind the pedestrian area leading into Marienplatz and Odeonsplatz, the old town is actually a hard-working business area. Here is Salvatorstrasse.



















As you would expect from any European capital (Munich was the capital of Bavaria for centuries), megalomaniac stuatues are never far away... Meet kings Ludwig I and Maximilian I.







 

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Bike It!
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Wow! I didn't know Munich is that beautiful. Undoubtedly a city well worth a visit! :eek:kay:
 

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Ike
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Beautiful. I look forward to more.
 

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México
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2,778 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
More from Munich's old town...All photos by me.

Marienplatz is the central square of the city, where the spectacular "New" City Hall is located.

































Also in the square, the comparatively tiny "Old" City Hall. The reconstruction of the old hall looks much newer than the old, one, though...:lol:

















You can go up the main tower of the New City Hall for an up-close view of the many sculptures that decorate the facades.







And of course, the city beyond is also worth a look from above!













































For an upclose look at the Mary Column and the City Hall's mechanical clock, you can go the top-floor cafe of the large bookstore that's right across the square.











And finally, some random impressions of the central city.





















































 

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México
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Unless you're on a whirlwind tour, and if you have any interest in museums and art, you might want to devote a full day to visiting the city's trio of painting museums: The New, Old and Modern Picture Galleries.

On your walk over from the old town, you'll walk past several major office buildings and HQ's, but no skyscrapers. I was there during the weekend, and like many a central business area, it was deserted. I love skyscrapers as much as next SSC member (perhaps a little less..), but I've made the point before: Skyscraper areas are cool only if there's life in them after the suits have gone home.











The Alte Pinakothek contains a breathtaking collection of old masters and renaissance works. The building is rather austere, and some of the galleries almost look like vacated office space, but you'll barely notice, seeing all those masterpieces you've seen in books!












Next door, the Neue Pinakothek houses an impressive collection of modern art. The architecture and gallery space is much nicer. It won't wow you, but the collections definitely will! :banana:

















Finally, the Pinakothek der Moderne is the city's contemporary and design museum. Very sleek!































There are several other large museums in the area. This is the Brandhurst. I was too visually overloaded to go in...:lol:






The area between the Pinakothek museums and the monumental Ludwistrasse boulevard is not particularly cool, apparently, but I thought it had plenty of nice shops and restaurants.
























And we're back in the old town! Bis später! :)













































 

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Registered
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awesome!awesome!awesome!
this is my first taste of a German city and I immediately fell in love with it.
I remembered leaning to that fountain in Marienplazt and admiring the great architecture
of the surrounding buildings and particularly the details of the new city hall while its clock
was playing its beautiful music.
thank you for giving me back that wonderful experience.
 

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México
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Ludwigstrasse is Munich's answer to the Champs Élysées. It links Odeonsplatz with Schwabing, the bohemian quarter. Built in the early 19th Century in Italian renaissance style, the avenue is lined with several important institutions, including several Bavarian government ministries. The start of the avenue is marked by the statue of Kings Louis I, after whom it is named.






















The St Louis Church is the tallest building on the avenue, by far.













The Louis and Maximilian University is one of the main cultural insitutions located on the avenue.









The other is the National Bavarian Library.















Going back towards the beginning of Ludwistrasse, let's walk through the gates of the Hofgarten (Palace Garden), the Residence's official garden/park. The place is not huge, but it's beaufiful, especially in the early morning and late afternoon.

























At the end of the park, the Bavarian Parliament completes a wonderfully monumental ensamble!











Back to the high-end area between Ludwidstrasse and Maximilianstrasse.









 

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México
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Street scenes



















The Frauenkirche is the city's cathedral in everything but name. Judging by its austere gothic interior you could think you are not actually in a Catholic temple.

























The Residence palace is the city's central former royal digs. The kingdom of Bavaria was a power player for centuries before Germany became a unified nation. Indeed, being large, Catholic, prosperous, and culturally distinct, there was every indication that Bavaria would remain a separate country. Even today, its official name is the Free State of Bavaria.









































The palace is huge, but highlights include the pretty courtyards, the grotto-like vaults, the chapel, the Antiquities room with its monumental decorated ceilings, and the Cuvillés theater, where opera performances are still staged.























More later!







 

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México
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2,778 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Downtown












































Munich and Southern Bavaria couldn't be more different from their Northern neighbors in terms of architectural traditions. An extreme example of that is the Asamkirche, named after the architect brothers who built it. The church is actually named St. Johann Nepomuk, and it is actually not as Small as it looks, it's just that every inch of it is covered in baroque ornamentation.















Much more restrained, but just as baroque, the white interior of the Theatinerkirche, on Odeonspltaz.







More of the pretty central area.































The Glockenbach/Gärtnerplatz area was the first to become famous for its creativity and trendy locales.










And back to the Old Town









 
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