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Muskego and New Berlin have been a hot bed for development over the past few years since the economy has picked up. Here's an overview of some of the projects going on in these two communities. (Disclaimer: I was born and raised in Muskego and have lived here my entire life, so I'm glad to be our reporter for this part of town!)

Muskego


  • Parkland Mall Redevelopment: Muskego's downtown has featured a vacant lot (sound familiar, Milwaukee?) since 2000 when the Parkland Mall was demolished. After some failed development proposals and then some lawsuits, a project has finally been proposed. Ener-Con Properties is proposing three four-story buildings with 33 condos each, a 30,000 sq ft unnamed grocer, a 14,000 sq ft commercial building, and a 10,000 sq ft commercial building, all surrounding a town square/public park. The city recently moved forward with looking into a TIF district for this site. More about this project here: http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/blog/real_estate/2015/07/grocery-condos-pitched-for-muskegos-former.html

  • Taco Bell: The fast food's entrance into Muskego has been long-awaited for many city residents (including myself). No more driving to New Berlin or Hales Corners... this location at Janesville and Moorland Road opens on August 10th.

  • DeWinter Eye Care Center: The owners of DeWinter Eye Care are currently constructing a new clinic at the corner of Janesville Rd and Bay Lane Dr. They would be moving from their current location down the street. The building would be close to the sidewalk and the road, with parking in the back.

  • Summit Credit Union: This project has been proposed for a while now in front of Kohl's on Moorland Road and has been approved by the city. Summit has said they will begin construction once they believe that the time is right for them.

  • Belle Chasse Subdivision: This 138-lot subdivision at the corner of Durham Dr and McShane Dr in southeast Muskego has rapidly been built out. Phase 1 was completed before the recession. Phase 2 was built last year and already has been built out. The roads for Phase 3 are being finished and many houses are starting to go up. This is one of the city's fastest-growing subdivisions in many year.

  • Aster Hills Estates: This 53 lot subdivision at the corner of Durham Dr and North Cape Rd in southeast Muskego is currently being graded. Streets will be installed later this year, and houses will start to be constructed next spring. A portion of this land has been dedicated to the city for a community park -- something that does not exist in this part of the city.
New Berlin


  • Costco: This location is currently under construction at the northeast corner of Moorland Rd and Grange Ave. This week, ceiling beams started going up. The store is anticipated to open at the end of the year.

  • Prospect Creek Shopping Center: This development is proposed at the southwest corner of Moorland Rd and Beloit Rd. Panera Bread and Arby's are building standalone properties, and there will be a small multi-tenant retail building that would have a Papa John's and other unnamed tenants. Construction has yet to begin on this project, but equipment has arrived on scene.

  • Dunham's Sports: This sporting goods store will be moving into the former Sportsman's Warehouse that has been vacant for some time now in the Moorland Commons development at the northeast corner of Moorland Rd and Beloit Rd. The store is currently building out their interior and should open later this year.
 

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Plans to develop New Berlin's Moorland Road Corridor advance

The Plan Commission will meet on Aug. 24 regarding proposed land use changes to the South Moorland Road Corridor.

The South Moorland Road Corridor, which runs along Moorland Road and Sunnyslope Road from Grange Avenue to College Avenue, mostly consists of land that city planners call 'planned conservation development,' or undeveloped property.

The city hopes to convert this land to a mixed-use space, complete with a business park, residential neighborhoods, and a recreational park.


http://www.gmtoday.com/news/business/front/topstory583.asp
 

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Discussion Starter #4
December Update

Here's an update to these projects in Muskego and New Berlin as of this past weekend. I was home and able to check out the progress of these projects.

Muskego

  • Parkland Mall Redevelopment: Nothing new about this project since it was announced over the summer. Still waiting on news about a TIF district.

  • DeWinter Eye Care Center: This building is pretty much complete. All that is left is signage and interior build-out.

  • Summit Credit Union: Construction has officially started on this project in front of Kohl's on Moorland Road. Three large concrete columns are up, with the rest of the walls under construction.

  • Aster Hills Estates: This subdivision will be cleared for development later this month. All of the streets and improvements have been completed.
New Berlin

  • Costco: This location opened on November 6th!

  • Prospect Creek Shopping Center: Panera Bread and Arby's buildings have quickly gone up. The multi-tenant building for Papa John's and Mattress Firm has not begun construction yet.

  • Dunham's Sports: This store is now open!

  • Multi-Tenant Retail: A new multi-tenant retail building has started construction at the NW corner of Moorland Rd and National Ave, just across from McDonald's. Tenants have not been announced yet.
 

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From today's Waukesha Freeman / GMToday.com:

New Berlin City Center value increases nearly $15 million in two years

Since 2013, the real estate value of the City Center in New Berlin has increased by $14.6 million, which doesn’t include some projects recently completed, according to a staff report.

According to the report, the City Center is about 138 acres in size, of which approximately 58 percent is commercial, 12 percent is multi-family residential, 6 percent is single-family residential, 21 percent is conservancy and 3 percent is institutional. Approximately 18 acres remain vacant.


http://www.gmtoday.com/news/business/front/topstory197.asp
 

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Here's an update on the Parkland Mall redevelopment from today's Gmtoday.com:

Muskego to receive $500,000 for redeveloping former Parkland Mall

The state is awarding Muskego $500,000 in its efforts to redevelop the long-vacant Parkland Mall in its downtown area.

The plan for the former Parkland Mall, S74-W1700 Janesville Road, is to redevelop it into a $34 million Parkland Towne Center, which will include a new Sendik’s grocery store, 90 units of housing and 53,000 square feet of commercial space.


http://www.gmtoday.com/news/local_stories/2016/07222016-muskego-to-receive-$500000-for-redeveloping-former-parkland-mall.asp
 

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Coffee Road Corridor at Calhoun and Woelfel/Stigler Roads in New Berlin

There is an open space pocket along Coffee Road from east of Calhoun Road to just west of Woelfel/Stilgler Roads surrounded by residential and light industrial that could become the next mixed use commercial/office/residential space for New Berlin. At least 315 acres of open land is in this corridor and much of it is currently on the real estate market. Also if Stigler Road could be expanded south to connect at Woelfel and Coffee as well as adding a walking path along Coffee and traffic signals at Calhoun and Woelfel/Stigler extended, it would create much better traffic flow to New Berlin West High School, Malone Park and the recycling center along with connecting Casper Drive to Coffee Road. This is going to be the next major new growth location for New Berlin in the next 5 to 10 years.
 

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Curious as to why Western NB doesn't seem to be developing whereas Waukesha and Muskego are doing much better. I'm from NB and it seems like very little has changed since I was a kid with the exception of the National Avenue area, the Moorland Road area near Muskego, and the residential development south of Grange, east of Sunnyslope. Is it a water issue?
 

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Curious as to why Western NB doesn't seem to be developing whereas Waukesha and Muskego are doing much better. I'm from NB and it seems like very little has changed since I was a kid with the exception of the National Avenue area, the Moorland Road area near Muskego, and the residential development south of Grange, east of Sunnyslope. Is it a water issue?
Count your blessings all those beautiful greenfields are NOT being developed. Development is not always a good thing, especially in rural undeveloped areas.
 

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Count your blessings all those beautiful greenfields are NOT being developed. Development is not always a good thing, especially in rural undeveloped areas.


Well, a few of those greenfields are now disappearing. Most of the tillable land WEST of and along Sunnyslope, between Grange and College, is currently being developed into two separate single family home subdivisions. Much of the road work and re-grading happened last fall. The roads are currently being built, along with 2-4 model homes in each subdivision. I think the one at SS and Grange will be Red Fox Crossing and the one across and just south from Elmwood Elementary will be Thomson Hollow.


I drive by frequently, and these have been moving along pretty quickly.


As a side note, and presumably associated with these two developments, they have been building a paved pedestrian trail adjacent to Sunnyslope, and out of the road ROW. It is maybe 40-50% done?
 

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Ooo, I like this. I'm gonna start calling all of those New Berliners wearing cowboy boots and driving big trucks "faux hicks". :lol:
Are they that? Or are they Hicks becoming 'faux suburbanites'? :lol:

I ask because it seems suburbia is...faux...
 

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Are they that? Or are they Hicks becoming 'faux suburbanites'? :lol:

I ask because it seems suburbia is...faux...
Lol, fair point for sure, however I guess my larger point is that in Milwaukee, more than other places, we have a large number of suburban communities that try to pretend they are small rural towns, will enforce code and zoning requirements to keep up that illusion.
 

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Lol, fair point for sure, however I guess my larger point is that in Milwaukee, more than other places, we have a large number of suburban communities that try to pretend they are small rural towns, will enforce code and zoning requirements to keep up that illusion.
Completely agree.
 

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Curious as to why Western NB doesn't seem to be developing whereas Waukesha and Muskego are doing much better. I'm from NB and it seems like very little has changed since I was a kid with the exception of the National Avenue area, the Moorland Road area near Muskego, and the residential development south of Grange, east of Sunnyslope. Is it a water issue?
Well for starters there is really a difficult situation in terms of overall connectivity in western New Berlin. Your main arteries for traffic are mostly cut off going in all directions the further you go west. With that cutoff, access to I-94, the Bluemound Road corridor, and I-43 are all impacted.

In a perfect world, Racine Avenue should ultimately be going northward and connecting up with Barker Road. But instead, Barker has a terminus at Greenfield Road and Racine Ave turns into Johnson Rd and cuts itself off near the railroad tracks on the other side of the hill where Barker/Johnson Rd ends in a cul-de-sac on a hillside. Calhoun Road has no I-94 access, and abruptly goes from Brookfield's 4-lane with a boulevard down to a crummy 2-lane road. This is the case DESPITE WISDOT wanting an interchange at Calhoun and New Berlin years back originally planning to widen the road, but ultimately deciding against it. Calhoun, by the way, also has no I-43 access and has its terminus at Small Road on the other side of I-43, therefore chopping off any direct links from travelers S/SW going N.

Additionally, the only main roads E-W that are of use for actual travel-through are Grange/Small, National, Cleveland and Greenfield. Grange/Small is mostly 2-lane residential. Cleveland, despite being the southern border for NB's primary industrial park, has the problem of being a 2-lane road east and west of NB, and thus not a primary road. This leaves only National (a diagonal SW road to Mukwonago and Greenfield (the northern border road for NB/Brookfield).

When you look at National, and look at Moorland, those two primary thoroughfares are decently built up through the burb. Because those two are basically the only roads in NB that can take travelers outside the burb to other destinations, which enables more traffic and thus more commerce and subdivisions to sprout up.

Sorry for the lengthy write-up, but that's the big problem there. Franklin and Muskego have similar issues. Whoever designed the metropolitan area terminated virtually ALL E-W thoroughfares in the southern metro within MKE County itself. Some would argue that this could have been some means waaay back in the day of early segregation tactics by resentful suburban communities trying to cut off Milwaukee's city growth by insulating themselves with difficult road access. Because take note that the northern metro, where the City of MKE hits the border with Waukesha County, the main thoroughfares up there (Capitol, Hampton, Silver Spring, Good Hope, Brown Deer/Main Street) go a pretty long distance. And notice how the NW metro has overall evenly spread-out growth.
 

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It's just the historical growth of the Milwaukee metro area. The general growth follows the settlement patterns of the original 3 towns. There has always been more growth North, Northwest, and West than there was south and southwest. John Gurda's "The Making of Milwaukee" is a must read for anyone interested in Milwaukee.
 

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It doesn't help anything, though, that the southern metro's primary roads get chopped off way before they should. The lack of direct road access and overall difficulty in getting around for the south/southwest metro plays a role. There shouldn't be much doubt in this.

Additionally, the settlement patterns of the three original 3 have no impact on how the other towns further south and west developed themselves. You simply had suburban communities make bad judgment calls, purposely or not, to terminate primary road corridors.

As an example, College Avenue (New Berlin's southern border road with Muskego) ends its primary road use in Greendale's Industrial Park. This should have not occurred. Instead, College Avenue should have pushed through the Root River Parkway into Whitnall Park, crossing Hwy 100 and cutting its way through the middle of the Hale Park subdivision (which would have been built differently) before linking up with its western segment at Janesville Road. If that would have happened, College Avenue would have had a road that linked up southern metro drivers from the Muskego/Big Bend border all the way east to the lakefront...literally.

Same goes with Rawson Avenue, which abruptly terminates at North Cape Road into a residential subdivision. And Ryan Road, which promptly terminates also at North Cape Road about a block or two west of the MKE/Waukesha county line. These terminations aren't a result of "settlement patterns of the original 3 towns" miles and miles away in a different section of the region. It's just poor planning or deliberate planning to keep "city folk" from being able to easily venture westward.
 

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The reason the original 3 play into it is because of the the growth rate in different directions and timing of when the various communities grew. This affected how much land the city of Milwaukee ended up annexing in different directions, the types of growth and urban planning the different municipalities had, etc.
 
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