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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
From Rail Journal:

http://www.railjournal.com/index.ph...-and-commuter-rail-expansion.html?channel=535

Nashville transit plan proposes LRT and commuter rail expansion
Thursday, August 18, 2016



PROPOSALS for a 74km light rail network and a second commuter rail line for Nashville have been included in a 25-year transit strategy for the region, which was presented to the boards of Nashville Metropoitan Transit Authority (NMTA) and Regional Transportation Authority of Middle Tennessee (RTA) on August 17 following 16 months of public consultation

Public feedback will now be sought on the recommendations of the nMotion plan before approval by the boards of the two authorities next month

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From Metro Report

http://www.metro-report.com/news/ne...w/view/nashville-transport-plan-unveiled.html

Nashville transport plan unveiled
18 Oct 2017



USA: Nashville Mayor Megan Barry announced a transport plan on October 17 that would include construction of a light rail network in the city.

Let’s Move Nashville: Metro’s Transportation Solution will be put to a ballot in May 2018. If approved, the $5·2bn scheme would be funded from sources including proposed tax increases

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PRESIDENT OF SPACE
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"Make no small plans, for they have no magic to stir men's blood".

I hope they prioritize LRT. The existing commuter rail line only moves a few hundred people daily. It's barely worth keeping so much as expanding.

But an underground light rail system under the city's core with frequent service to densely populating neighborhoods in a city that's growing rapidly both up and out seems like a good idea.

$6 billion is a lot, but I think that's a consequence of it being expensive to build stuff in this country rather than this being a wasteful plan. 15 years ago light rail lines cost a few hundred million, then the prices have inflated ever since.
 

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This kind of total politicisation of public transport investment just shouldn’t occur. This kind of thing really colours the political process in the US very negatively. There seems to rarely be consensus on any issues - something that is necessary to form long-term plans.

I get the historical reasons why things have evolved that way, but a more technocratic civil-servant led way of doing things (what I’m used to) seems much much less messy. Saying that is like pis**ng in the wind I suppose.
 

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This kind of total politicisation of public transport investment just shouldn’t occur. This kind of thing really colours the political process in the US very negatively. There seems to rarely be consensus on any issues - something that is necessary to form long-term plans.

I get the historical reasons why things have evolved that way, but a more technocratic civil-servant led way of doing things (what I’m used to) seems much much less messy. Saying that is like pis**ng in the wind I suppose.
I agree, but It's Nashville so it will most likely get rejected. The plan looks great and its probably what the city needs to grow, but my guess is residents will make the worst possible decision and complain about traffic 30 years later.

America is a 3rd world country when it comes to urban planning of any kind.
 

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Panache
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I agree, but It's Nashville so it will most likely get rejected. The plan looks great and its probably what the city needs to grow, but my guess is residents will make the worst possible decision and complain about traffic 30 years later.
Nashville certainly has it's share of conservative NIMBY types without a doubt, but Nashville has been a relatively progressive blue city amidst a sea of red for a very, very long time, which is why this referendum has had the support of a fairly significant majority in every poll conducted so far that I've seen. Will it pass in May? Only time will tell. The affair thing certainly does muddle the waters a bit (though it really shouldn't.) It does seem evident to me though that both your skepticism about the referendum and your overall opinion of Nashville are shaped primarily by dated stereotypes and not by any actual in depth personal experience. Come on over for a visit! You're in for a pleasant surprise, I think.
 

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Nashville certainly has it's share of conservative NIMBY types without a doubt, but Nashville has been a relatively progressive blue city amidst a sea of red for a very, very long time, which is why this referendum has had the support of a fairly significant majority in every poll conducted so far that I've seen. Will it pass in May? Only time will tell. The affair thing certainly does muddle the waters a bit (though it really shouldn't.) It does seem evident to me though that both your skepticism about the referendum and your overall opinion of Nashville are shaped primarily by dated stereotypes and not by any actual in depth personal experience. Come on over for a visit! You're in for a pleasant surprise, I think.
I actually have some relatives who moved to Tennessee from SoCal years ago and I've visited a few times. I'm no expert on Tennessee, but I definitely had a good time in Nashville and Memphis.

My previous post has nothing to do with political leanings or outdated stereotypes, but more about the realities of transit planning in many metropolitan areas in the US. There are many "progressive blue" urban areas in the US that suffer from the exact same problems Nashville will most likely face.

My skepticism stems from the fact that in order build a good transit system you need individuals, businesses, and political groups who are 100% committed and willing to stand by it through the thick and thin. When cost overruns occur (which they will) will people still support it or will they put elect new politicians to kill it? Are people committed to up-zoning and living in denser communities? How much support is there from the county and state which will be a necessity for the project to be a success? Is there already a culture of people taking public-transit in Nashville? I know the vast majority of people in Nashville drive, which means you will have a project competing against the majority of voters. Drivers hold political sway in both parties and they're going to push back against any transit system that threatens funding for their beloved roads.

I hope Nashville voters approve the project, but voters throughout the US are fickle and change opinions on a whim. Hence why I claim that the US is a 3rd world country when it comes to urban planning. Any type of urban planning requires a long-term outlook and we know Americans aren't too great at doing anything long-term when it comes to public-policy.
 

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"Nashville voters overwhelmingly reject transit referendum"

https://www.tennessean.com/story/ne...-vote-davidson-county-mass-transit/564991002/

Nashvillians resoundingly defeated a controversial plan that would have raised four taxes to fund a transit system anchored by light trail, voting against the historic referendum by a nearly 2-to-1 margin.

In a crushing blow to much of the city’s establishment that backed the proposal, more than 78,000 Nashvillians voted against the referendum and nearly 44,000 voted for it. It was a margin of about 64 percent to 36 percent.
 

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Time for Nashvillians to move on and get ready to welcome the world of people and corporations who aren't smitten by light rail.
 
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