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A couple of observations here:

On the bottom photograph, the entablature extends over the edge of the column capitals on the side. It doesn't appear to extend over the front edge, but it clearly does on the sides. The face of the architrave, which is the lowest component of the entablature should align with the face of the pilaster below, both on the front face and side faces. If a column is used, then the architrave should tangentially align with the upper part of the column shaft.

The upper windows have segmental pediments that have missing components. A pediment springs from a cornice profile, which has a bed moulding at the bottom, a horizontal and vertical component called the soffit and corona, and the cymatium or crown moulding at the top. Therefore a pediment should also contain those same components, except that cymatium or crown moulding follows the top arc of the upper cornice of the pediment but is missing from the lower horizontal cornice. Notice that, with the exception of the crown, both upper and lower cornices have the same profile.

Here's an example (found on www.bafaloah.com via Google):

Although understanding of the orders is very important, one must also realize that when it comes to residential architecture there is often more flexibility.

Many folk styles of the past are the product of "incorrect" interpretations of previous styles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,322 ·
A couple of observations here:

On the bottom photograph, the entablature extends over the edge of the column capitals on the side. It doesn't appear to extend over the front edge, but it clearly does on the sides. The face of the architrave, which is the lowest component of the entablature should align with the face of the pilaster below, both on the front face and side faces. If a column is used, then the architrave should tangentially align with the upper part of the column shaft.

The upper windows have segmental pediments that have missing components. A pediment springs from a cornice profile, which has a bed moulding at the bottom, a horizontal and vertical component called the soffit and corona, and the cymatium or crown moulding at the top. Therefore a pediment should also contain those same components, except that cymatium or crown moulding follows the top arc of the upper cornice of the pediment but is missing from the lower horizontal cornice. Notice that, with the exception of the crown, both upper and lower cornices have the same profile.

Here's an example (found on www.bafaloah.com via Google):

Interesting insight!

Where did you learn all this?
 

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I learned this on my own. It requires lots of observation of historic buildings. Unfortunately, most architecture schools no longer teach traditional architecture.
That's actually pretty impressive. :cheers:
 

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Although understanding of the orders is very important, one must also realize that when it comes to residential architecture there is often more flexibility.

Many folk styles of the past are the product of "incorrect" interpretations of previous styles.
Indeed it would look nicer if it were to follow said rules, because it looks bloated and fake. It's a shame because a lot of these new Chicago townhouses look absolutely perfect.
 

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From the NYC Construction thread:

Another Tribeca update:


CurbedNY

Website just launched for this project. Construction should begin on this project shortly. The building on the right is existing, while the building on the left will be constructed out of aluminum brick.
 

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^^ LOVE IT! :cheers:

However, not a fan of the aluminum...
 

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A couple of observations here:

On the bottom photograph, the entablature extends over the edge of the column capitals on the side. It doesn't appear to extend over the front edge, but it clearly does on the sides. The face of the architrave, which is the lowest component of the entablature should align with the face of the pilaster below, both on the front face and side faces. If a column is used, then the architrave should tangentially align with the upper part of the column shaft.

The upper windows have segmental pediments that have missing components. A pediment springs from a cornice profile, which has a bed moulding at the bottom, a horizontal and vertical component called the soffit and corona, and the cymatium or crown moulding at the top. Therefore a pediment should also contain those same components, except that cymatium or crown moulding follows the top arc of the upper cornice of the pediment but is missing from the lower horizontal cornice. Notice that, with the exception of the crown, both upper and lower cornices have the same profile.

Here's an example (found on www.bafaloah.com via Google):

Although understanding of the orders is very important, one must also realize that when it comes to residential architecture there is often more flexibility.

Many folk styles of the past are the product of "incorrect" interpretations of previous styles.
One must also realize that there are actually no pure/perfect/correct styles. It is a neo-classical scholastic myth. And here has never been a period in which there was no variation in the arrangement of elements.

In the classic world (old Greek and Roman times) there actually was a lot of variation. Not just by region, but especially in time. Sometimes it's really weird to see some (pre-classic) Etruscan temples. It's like a culture who vaguely heard about Greek architecture, but were completely incompetent of building them. When in fact, the Greeks were the ones who further developed them into something that has a very harmonious look. I think the Doric temple is the thing that comes the closest to something that developed into something that could be called a perfected shape. Like the Parthenon. It is the most bounded by rules and has the least variation. The Ionic and the Corinthian have always been subject to variation. It where the most elegant ones that afterwards were called 'correct'. During renaissance, barock and neoclassical times there has also never been consensus. Just endless varied attempts in building the perfect building.


I just love the plates of Piranesi on which you can see the idealization of the classic times during the renaissance. You can see the noble men visiting the grand remains of a grand lost civilisation. Among the noblemen it was highly fashionable to visit Rome. Piranesi's personal style was to grandly overstate and romanticize the grandiosity of the ruins. Not that that was the common style, but it lovely gives us a peek into those days. In how they admired the classic times. It was also the birth of archeology. Students and architects traveled to those ruins to measure them. Piranesi was one of the big names in the academic archaeological/architectural debate and at the same time he made his money from the sale of plates to those tourists.

So to conclude ;) Yes, lots of classical knowledge has been lost by the common public and even the architectural practice. But the scientific archaeological knowledge of today is much better and there is no arbitrary idealization anymore.
 

· centralnatbankbuildingrva
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Hey I wanted to show a nice example of a new build in classical style.
It's in Bucharest, Romania in the Dorobanti area. It was finished in 2012.

This actually looks like Beaux Arts, unlike the "Laid Arts" stuff some people have been putting up on this thread.
 

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New Building, Old World Charm

The design of this building is inspired by old European structures. The owner, Ashebir Wondimsisha; the architetcts: Alebel Mekuria, Kenimos Tesfaye and Million Samuel, had to actually travel to Europe for a hint of the kind of building they wanted to have, said a person close to the owner.

The idea for the design of the building was raised by Alebel, who wanted the building to fit with the old look of Piassa.

Located along General Wingate Street in the Piassa area adjacent to Enrico's Pastry, the building rests on 700sqm, out of an 800sqm plot leased from the Ali Abdo Administration for 40 years.

The construction, which is still in progress, has so far taken about 80 million Br, according to the same person.

Ashebir is the owner of Asham Trade and Industry and Addis Décor, located in the Arada building in Piassa.

The structure will serve as a mixed use purpose building including apartments, offices and banks.

The stones, brought from Legetafo, were cut by 63 professional stone cutters. Completion of the construction is expected in two months.

Compiled by Wudineh Zenebe, Special to Fortune






Pictures mine.
 
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