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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
:cheers2:
We as a region need come together and build a rail system that rivals Europe, because our economic future of this region will depend on it.

Connecticut Routes
Hartford to Providence
Hartford to Boston
Hartford to New Haven
Hartford to Waterbury, Danbury,Brewster,NY
Hartford to Springfield

New Hampshire Routes
Boston to Concord NH
Boston to Portsmouth NH
Boston to Keene NH
All via MBTA T

Massachusetts Routes
A Route -128 Light Rail System that has stops at all Commuter Rail crossings, also stops at key towns and business / office parks. This highway is a key link and also a parking lot.

High Speed Rail for freight and add a third rail line on the Amtrak NEC for dedicated Freight so we can up the speeds of passenger trains.

Extensions to MBTA T commuter rail to New Hampshire, Maine, RI, Lets not leave out VT.
With gas at $4 we need to start thinking out of the box and get our heads out of the sand. And don't think buses will solve our problems!

We should use DMU Bombardier Talent trains and some day goes to EMU Bombardier Regina trains.

Most of this would require new rails and or additional second set of tracks for real two way traffic. Limit freight traffic to off hours so passenger rail does not suffer delays. High Tech signals, laser alignments of rails.

We need to be leaders again in the world instead of followers in our innovation, and get our leaders to see the light!!! Like Congress

Here is a cool WebSite http://www.trainsnotlanes.com/page20.html

Here is a Google Map I created of rail lines in the Northeast
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=109226583957077835668.00044393b05635e5793fe&ll=41.95132,-73.256836&spn=3.488551,11.030273&z=7
 

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Told you so...
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I know there's been tons of talk about the Boston-Montreal corridor, but all it's been is talk. Getting something simple like the Lowell-Nashua commuter rail extension seems impossible, not to mention the talks of incorporating rail into the Salem-Manchester I-93 widening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Picture of a train type I would like to see

Think of trains like these in Massachusetts connecting people and commuter rail lines along Route-128 or in Connecticut connecting Danbury to Hartford, Springfield, Hartford,New Haven.



:cheers:
 

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DJ Michael
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i lived in this area and that will be too bad to see that ^ We need something alot faster. example- i can drive to Boston from where I live in about 35-45 min., if I take the train in the next town ,<5 min away, it takes 60-65 min with the T.
 

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DJ Michael
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$14 billion boost weighed for Acela
D.C.-N.Y. trip would take under two hours
By SUMMER HARLOW • The News Journal • May 29, 2008

The French AGV zooms by at 200 mph and China's Shanghai Maglev eats up the rails at 350 mph -- more than double the 125-mph average of the Japanese Bullet train.


By comparison, Amtrak's Acela train creeps along at an average of 83 mph. But the Acela could be in store for a power boost.

The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has approved a proposal by Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., to consider using a public-private partnership to bring high-speed rail to the Northeast corridor.

Mica and Rep. Mike Castle, R-Del., touted the plan for 150-plus-mph trains at a news conference Wednesday afternoon at the Wilmington Amtrak station -- although whether those trains would actually stop there is unclear.

"This really captures people's imaginations when gas has been hovering around $4 a gallon," Mica said. "There's no other alternative. How much more of Delaware or Florida or New York can you pave?"

The plan, which will require Senate approval, is part of the five-year reauthorization for Amtrak, which has seen an 11 percent rise in passengers over last year.

Amtrak carries about 26 million passengers a year, about half of whom are traveling in the Northeast corridor between Washington and Boston. Among commuters between Washington and New York City, more use trains than planes, making the area ripe for private investment, Mica said.

The idea is to cut the travel time between New York and Washington from two hours and 45 minutes to less than two hours. Trains would have to go 150 mph or faster to do that, but exactly how fast and whether they would stop in Wilmington still has to be determined.

The Wilmington station is Amtrak's 11th-busiest in the nation, so Castle said he would "fight like heck" to make sure any high-speed trains stopped here.

How much it would cost to build high-speed rail lines separated from standard commuter and freight lines, and construct new bridges and tunnels, also is unknown. Mica said such upgrades would require at least a $14 billion investment, and it could be a decade or more before the service is in place.

The high-speed proposal would require the U.S. Department of Transportation to seek proposals from the private sector for engineering, financing, building and operating a two-hour express service between New York City and the nation's capital. That rail line then could be used as a prototype for other high-speed trains across the country.

Private investors who helped finance such trains in England already are turning a profit, but that doesn't mean it will be easy to get the private sector on board here, the congressmen said, adding that the federal government also will have to pony up quite a bit of money.

"My sense is the private community will take an interest in this, but there will be a lot of negotiations about how much it will cost and who will pay for what," Castle said, adding he knows no company is going to offer to pay for everything. "I think it can be worked out, but the private contribution is hard to judge."

Rafiq Baker, 30, who was waiting for a train back home to Manhattan after a day of business in Wilmington, said he found it hard to believe the private sector would want to take a risk with Amtrak.

"Amtrak has a history of borderline bankruptcy, so why would a private institution want to back it?" said Baker, who works for JPMorgan Chase. "It doesn't sound very profitable from a business perspective."

Tony DeSantis, president of the Delaware Valley Association of Rail Passengers, said he has no doubt the country, especially this area, needs high-speed rail service. But he has a "Jerry Maguire" issue, he said.

"Show me the money," he said. "The private sector is not going to put up the cash to do this. Taxpayers are going to have to pay for this, but I think there's enough public benefit that it is worth public investment."

Unlike Amtrak nationwide, the Northeast corridor actually is making a profit, Mica said, so investing in a high-speed upgrade would "not be a losing proposition" for a private company.

For the past decade, Congress has been underwriting Amtrak to the tune of $1.2 billion a year, or about $50 per train ticket.

And considering that without Amtrak, I-95 would be a "parking lot," a several-billion-dollar federal investment is more than worthwhile, Castle said.

Because of high capital costs, Amtrak always will need some help from Congress, Amtrak spokesman Cliff Black said.

But installing high-speed rail has the potential to increase the 3.5 million passengers a year on the Northeast corridor's Acela to 30 million, Mica said, and it would make room for more commuter and freight trains to run on schedule.

Plus, Black said, whenever running time is reduced, ridership increases.

Upgrading the country's rail system is long overdue, Black said.

"There couldn't be a better time to address our mobility problems," he said. "The nation is in a transportation crisis with the deterioration of roads, and congestion on the roads and at airports. There needs to be an investment in rail to make it part of the transportation mix, especially as rising gas prices have brought passenger trains to the forefront."

Delmarva Rail Passenger Association President Tom Posatko, who attended Wednesday's news conference, said he believes Mica's plan is proof of a ground shift in the country's thinking about the need for trains as part of a comprehensive transportation system -- especially in light of rocketing gas prices.

But a high-speed system is geared more toward a niche market of business travelers, he said.

"The average family going to New York for the day is not going to want to pay a premium," he said.

Merleen Macdonald of West Chester, Pa., who was waiting for a train to Richmond, Va., Wednesday, said she didn't like the idea of taxpayers footing a multibillion-dollar bill just to shave 45 minutes off the trip from New York to D.C.

"Already, the Acela is cost-prohibitive to the average person," said Macdonald, 61. "The Acela only takes 10 minutes less, and it's twice the amount of money. I don't know that's worth it."

Contact Summer Harlow at 324-2794 or [email protected] online.com.
http://delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080529/NEWS02/805290340/-1/COMMUNITIES10
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is a link to Boston-Montreal corridor http://www.aot.state.vt.us/Planning...l Report 4-30-03 Boston-Montreal Chapter2.pdf

Nice thought but read this link. The Tracks are single with sections for trains to pull over and let other trains go by. But the speeds are so slow it would be a joke. When it was a regular service the top speed was 39 MPH and over 12 hours to go 329 miles.

The right way would be to upgrade the tracks for 80 - 100 MPH trains or higher, add a second set of tracks, use tilt trains like the Bombarier Regina or Amtrak Acela. In Europe & Asia they must be :rofl: as to our rail systems and plans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I wish that it could come true, but Connecticut (at least) isn't a very long-term thinking state that tries to find cheap solutions instead. I've heard politicians here talking about making HSR to NY and Boston a reality, but it's just all talk.

We don't even have commuter rail, let alone high speed. :eek:hno:
Having grown up in Connecticut in New London, I remember the good old days of rail. There are so many options that you could have if they vision of what is needed for the future of Connecticut and the region as a whole !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Not sure how going to Nashua,NH would help RT 2 traffic, but Mass also needs a loops to connect all the spokes of the Mass Commuter rail lines.


 

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metrocard millionaire
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You know, I'm in Germany right now and I can honestly say the ICE really puts our trains to shame. We gotta rid of our politicians or something, I really wish we had something like the ICE back home (not ACELA!!!!)
 
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