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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Even with all the pro-active smart growth things New Jersey is known for, this little state geographically still has the most of the the new development acreage wise taken up by single house developments. Its a shame that Governor Corzine is against maintaining and keeping alive a conservation easement program that protects land from development. :eek:hno:




Study sees N.J. fully 'built-out' within 50 years



Wednesday, May 30, 2007


By MICHAEL RISPOLI
Gannett State Bureau

TRENTON
About 15,000 open acres of New Jersey are developed each year, including significant amounts in the central and coastal parts of the state, said a preliminary report released Tuesday by researchers from Rutgers and Rowan universities.

The report, issued about every 10 years, said the state over the past decade has lost 106,000 acres to residential and commercial development. This is similar to the rate of developed land between 1986 and 1995.

More land acreage was eaten up by a smaller amount of people, however, as single-unit residential homes made up the majority of the growth.

"In spite of "smart growth' and in spite of open space preservation, development pressure does not slow down," said John Hasse, an associate professor of geography at Rowan University and one of the authors of the report.

Hasse also said because the state is facing the inevitable full build-out, possibly within the next 50 years, the state should look to limit wasteful development and focus energy on responsible growth.

"New Jersey will get built out," added David Pringle, campaign director of the New Jersey Environment Federation. "The question is just what will it look like when it is built out."

Coastal counties -- Atlantic, Monmouth, and Ocean -- and Central New Jersey counties -- Middlesex and Somerset -- were "hot spots" for growth, said the report.

The study, however, did not look at whether more acres would have been developed if land tagged for development had not been preserved by things such as the Garden State Preservation Trust, which provides communities key funding to acquire open space and farmland and preserve historic sites.

As the money for the open space fund dwindles, the Department of Environmental Protection this month released a report estimating long term benefits from the natural environment at nearly $20 billion a year, including wildlife tourism, which it says generates about $3 billion.

The DEP and Rutgers/Rowan reports together have caused environmental groups to further step up calls for the renewal of the fund, citing environmental and economic reasons.

"Based on the enormous value of these resources to the people of our state, renewing the GSPT this fall is the only fiscally prudent course of action," said Tom Wells, director of government relations for the Nature Conservancy in New Jersey.

Environmentalists support putting a question on this November's ballot asking voters to dedicate $175 million in sales tax revenue annually for the next 30 years to pay for land purchases over the next 10 years. Gov. Jon S. Corzine does not support the ballot question and has said he would like an alternative long-term funding source, most likely from "monetizing" a state asset.

http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.../705300360/1006
 

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I disagree with this article. I don't think the state will be built-out in 50 years, and I tend to think that it might never be built-out. The Pine Barrens are a very desolate place, one of the most desolate places in the Mid-Atlantic. It's swampy, forested, and isolated from any decent-sized city. Not many people are going to want to live there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I disagree with this article. I don't think the state will be built-out in 50 years, and I tend to think that it might never be built-out. The Pine Barrens are a very desolate place, one of the most desolate places in the Mid-Atlantic. It's swampy, forested, and isolated from any decent-sized city. Not many people are going to want to live there.
I'm pretty sure the article is not talking about parks and places like the Pine Barrens. The point its making is that with a growing population and static land, most of the development seems to be counterintuitive to sustainable growth.
 

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North Jersey is built out but South Jersey is far from built out. Why do people always think North Jersey represents the whole state? It doesn't.
 
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