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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
http://southflorida.bizjournals.com/southflorida/stories/2005/05/16/daily44.html

Coyote Ugly to open in Coconut Grove

The Coyote Ugly Saloon said it has signed a long-term lease for space in The Gallery at Cocowalk.
The bar, made nationally famous when a movie took its name as a title, said it expects the Coconut Grove location to open late this year. It will be the 16th Coyote Ugly Saloon in the United States and the third in Florida.

"Florida has been very good to us," Coyote Ugly Saloon founder Liliana "Lil" Lovell said. "With the wild success of our bars in Tampa and Panama City, we think the South Florida market is perfect for our brand of bar. We look forward to serving the locals and tourists alike."

Lovell, who did not give lease terms, said she will soon announce a search for "talented, sexy and witty women" to work at the Coconut Grove location. Two months ago, Coyote Ugly Saloon said, a Coyote Girl search in Denver saw more than 700 women compete for 30 spots.
 

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Not that this is "News" to anyone:

http://southflorida.bizjournals.com/southflorida/stories/2005/05/16/daily34.html

Study: Miami pay falls under national median

Feeling overworked and underpaid? Well, overworked is open for debate, but nationally, a study shows folks in Miami are underpaid for the same work done elsewhere.
For example, for a job with median national salary of $30,000, someone in Miami would be paid 2.3 percent less, or $29,310.

The 2005 Geographic Salary Differentials study from Mercer Human Resource Consulting found pay levels remain linked to geographic location. The total variation was more than 32 percentage points - from 9.3 percent below the national median to 23.5 percent above.

For that same $30,000 median salary, someone might earn as much as $37,050 in San Francisco, $36,900 in San Jose, or $35,670 in New York.

On the other end of the spectrum, the study said that salary would equate to $27,870 in Mobile, Ala; $27,300 in Baton Rouge, La.; or $27,210 in Birmingham, Ala.

For folks already earning more money, there is some good news in the findings, though.

Mercer, an international firm with a Miami office, said geographic pay variations are less pronounced, but still evident, at higher pay levels.

For example, for a job with a median salary of $60,000 nationally, pay varies from a low of $54,840 (-8.6 percent) in Baton Rouge to a high of $72,300 (+20.5 percent) in San Jose for a variation of about 29 percentage points.

Even at $90,000, though, there are still pay variations by geography.

Cities including Little Rock at $85,410, Buffalo and Omaha, both at $86,130, represent the lower end of the pay range. Holding the top spots: New York at $104,130, San Francisco at $103,590 and San Jose at $102,870. Among the 200 cities in Mercer's study, the pay variance at the higher salary level was nearly 21 percentage points.

Moving people, shifting money
For larger employers, Mercer said its analysis highlights challenges in moving an employee, especially from a relatively high-salary area to a relatively low-salary area.

Darrell Cira, a senior compensation consultant in Mercer's Philadelphia office, said it is important to understand the difference between cost of living and cost of labor. Cost of living reflects local cost of goods such as housing, groceries, transportation and entertainment. Cost of labor is local cash compensation for the same work.

"Every year, we encounter employers that adjust pay for the cost of living differences between locations, and this is the wrong approach," Cira said. "While cost of living and geographic pay differentials correlate, cost of living differentials between locations tend to be far greater."

Cira said organizations moving individuals from one location to another should pay a locally competitive salary and offset expenses such as higher rents and home prices in the relocation package.
 

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No, it isn't news that employers pay less in Miami than many other places, but that is becuase they don't have to.

This might be news:
If your salary is $100,000 per year in Manhattan, you would need $52,241 to live the equivilent lifestyle.
Most of us would argue, a better lifestyle.
Check it out, it is fun to experiment. Here is the relocation calculator
 

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ever wanted to live on a cruise ship? here's your chance...

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/11690163.htm

World's No. 2 floating condo to sail in 2007

The Condo at Sea market is getting more crowded: Miami's Ocean Development is set to build a 656-foot ship in which all of its units are sold as condominiums.

BY MATTHEW HAGGMAN

mhaggman[email protected]

Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts is joining with a Miami maritime developer to build a ship where all of the units are sold as condominiums.

It would be the world's second floating condo.

Miami's Ocean Development is set to begin marketing state rooms sold as condo units on a 656-foot, 12-deck, 42,500-ton ship. Dubbed M/S Four Seasons, shipyard workers in Helsinki, Finland, are scheduled to begin constructing the vessel before the end of the year. Its maiden voyage is slated for late 2007.

''What fascinates us is the idea of selling high-end real estate on a ship,'' said Kristian Stensby, chief executive of Ocean Development. ``This is not leisure travel. It is a private ocean-going residence.''

Four Seasons will manage the ship and, pending approval by the ship's homeowners association, operate the owners' rental program.

''Many of our hotels have a residential component,'' said Ignacio Gomes-Tobar, Four Seasons regional vice president. ``This is very much along the same lines except this would be . . . onboard a ship.''

The move by the Toronto-based luxury hotelier Four Seasons is a signal that floating condos, a very small niche area of the second- or vacation-home market, may increasingly be viewed as a growth area.

CHANGE OF VIEW

Instead of having the same Atlantic Ocean view every day from a Miami Beach high-rise, wealthy buyers would get living room views that change daily from sites of Santorini to coastal vistas of the Cte d'Azur.

Condo ship operators contend they are unique because itineraries are rarely repetitive and stays at each port are often longer. That, they say, separates them from cruise lines.

''It is forbidden to say the c-word,'' said James St. John, president of Miami-based ResidenSea, which launched the first floating condo. ``We spent eight days in Cape Town. We are the antithesis of the traditional cruise line.''

The same concept motivated Miami developer ResidenSea in March 2002 when it launched The World, billed as the first residence at sea.

But not straying too far from the traditional cruise line model, it initially retained 88 rooms to rent to paying guests while selling the remaining 110 units to condo buyers.

That decision proved troublesome. ''There was inherent conflict between someone looking for a cruise vacation and someone looking to be in their home,'' St. John said.

So The World's residents bought out the remaining units and ResidenSea was retained as the ship's manager. The World went into dry dock last year and its vacation rental units were converted into condos.

UNITS 91 PERCENT SOLD

All told, St. John said, the ship's units are 91 percent sold.

''ResidenSea proved it was doable despite the naysayers,'' said Rod Hackman, president of The Timeshare Beat, which covers the vacation home market. ``The product obviously has the greatest appeal for those affluent retired individuals and will remain so for the foreseeable future.''

Now, seeking to avoid ResidenSea's misstep, Ocean Development is selling all of its 96 units as condominiums from the start. Ten will be sold on a fractional basis. It partnered with Four Seasons in an effort to get immediate brand recognition.

Ocean Development was formed in 2002 by a group of former cruise industry executives whose aim is to build maritime leisure products. Its first venture is the M/S Four Seasons.

On the ship, buyers purchase a 50-year leasehold on the condo unit. Once the lease runs out, the homeowners association will decide what to do. ''They could keep going or they could choose to permanently dock the ship, whatever they want to do,'' Stensby said.

But buying a unit is not cheap, similar to the condo boom currently remaking South Florida's cities and shorelines.

Prices start at $4 million and range upward to $15 million. On top of that, annual maintenance fees -- that pay for everything from the ship's crew to the Four Seasons' management fee -- are 4 percent of the purchase price. In other words, a bottom-of-the-barrel unit comes with a starting yearly fee of more than $150,000. Then start paying for dinners and the rest.

UNIT SIZES VARY

Units have kitchens, living and dining rooms, double-sink bathrooms and walk-in closets and range from 1,300 square feet to more than 3,000 square feet.

Stensby contends the floating condo market will grow. He cited the aging baby boomer population that is now focusing more on leisure and travel. But a big driver, he argues, is advancing technology that allows owners to travel but stay connected with the mainland. For instance, Stensby said, cellphones or the Internet can be used while onboard the ship.

''I don't think it was possible 10 years ago,'' Stensby said. ``Communications were not there yet. Compare it to someone who has their main residence in New York and moves to Palm Beach in the winter season but continues to conduct their business. Our ship gives the same opportunity to do that.''
 

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Roark said:
No, it isn't news that employers pay less in Miami than many other places, but that is becuase they don't have to.

This might be news:
If your salary is $100,000 per year in Manhattan, you would need $52,241 to live the equivilent lifestyle.
Most of us would argue, a better lifestyle.
Check it out, it is fun to experiment. Here is the relocation calculator
Well, with the higher cost of living than average in America, they should have a higher annual salary than average. After all, the report does compare with even Texan, Midwestern cities where the cost of living is rather cheap compared to here. Most of America isn't California or New York City.
 

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jdnn said:
Well, with the higher cost of living than average in America, they should have a higher annual salary than average. After all, the report does compare with even Texan, Midwestern cities where the cost of living is rather cheap compared to here. Most of America isn't California or New York City.
Whoa.....THIS JUST IN!!!!!!!!!!
Most of America isn't California or New York City
Please say that you weren't educated in the Miami-Dade public school system.
 
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