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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've certainly noticed a significant boost in the population of New Orleans in the last few months. It is readily available driving just about anywhere in the City of New Orleans proper. Just last week the Mayor said we have passed 300,000 according to all statistics the City is presently analyzing. For every household that leaves New Orleans, today, it is replaced by 2 households moving into the City. Here's more on the real estate market:

N.O. population skewing younger, says realtor

12:39 PM CDT on Saturday, June 23, 2007

Stacia Willson / Eyewitness News Reporter

Trends reported by a local real estate company show what could be a population shift in Orleans Parish. In fact, that information was used recently to draw in potential investors from around the country.


“I wouldn't call it a tidal wave of people, but certainly ripples of people from out of state moving back into certain areas of the city, which is very reassuring to see,” said Arthur Sterbow, President of Latter and Blum Realtors


The numbers show a pretty strong ratio.


“What we're finding is that we're getting about two buyers moving into Greater Orleans Parish for about every buyer that's moving out of state,” Sterbow said.


And those coming in seem to be a younger group. Realtors said before Katrina, the majority of people who moved to New Orleans were anywhere from 35 to 50-years-old.


Realtors said they've noticed the older generation has moved away from neighborhoods like Lakeview, Lakefront and Broadmoor, and younger people have moved back into those areas.


“Most of the folks who are moving in that we found from out of state are typically 25 to 42 years of age, that seems to be a pretty broad profile of the kind of buyer we're getting in, younger than what we've previously saw,” Sterbow said.


John Alford, a Harvard graduate, moved to New Orleans from Brooklyn a year ago. He’s preparing to open a new charter school in Gentilly.


“New Orleans is leading the country in terms of charter school growth and highest potential of charter school growth in the country and since the storm there’s tremendous need to start new schools,” Alford said.


Bay Area native Miji Park moved to New Orleans 13 months ago. She works for a non-profit company called ‘Idea Village,’ which focuses on helping potential companies develop, but said that was not why she moved here.


“You can feel the history of the place, you can feel it through the architecture and the atmosphere, and that's what first drew me to move to New Orleans,” she said.


Both she and Alford feel the drawbacks from living in a recovering city are few and far between.


“I'd say it's livable. Potholes are a little tough, but everything else is good,” Alford said.


http://www.wwltv.com/local/stories/wwl062307khrealtors.8abda75.html
 

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If they could only get the schools in order and the crime reduced New Orleans would be thumping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
If they could only get the schools in order and the crime reduced New Orleans would be thumping.
We have one of the most exciting public school systems unfolding in New Orleans right now it is unreal. Education leaders throughout the US are getting involved. It's a unique position to be in...we are setting a new precedent with public schooling in New Orleans. We are setting new standards with charter schools. It is one small blessing Katrina has afforded New Orleans. For the first time I have optimism about our schools. As far as crime, unless you have a personal issue with crack cocaine, you really don't have too much concern. As for me, I don't have a crack cocaine problem, so I live my life in the city relatively worry free....
 

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New Orleans could solve its crime problems if it would actually keep the people they arrest in jail. However, they seem to be hell bent on maintaining the revolving door justice system.
 

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New Orleans could solve its crime problems if it would actually keep the people they arrest in jail. However, they seem to be hell bent on maintaining the revolving door justice system.
Do folks slip out of jail too easily? Of course, but I'm not so sure the answer is that easy. The place has one of the highest incarceration rates in the US. There always seems to be an up and coming set of 15 yr olds who are perfectly willing to murder and neighbors unwilling to "snitch". The police dept. also has a well-deserved reputation for corruption and untrustworthiness.
 

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We have one of the most exciting public school systems unfolding in New Orleans right now it is unreal. Education leaders throughout the US are getting involved. It's a unique position to be in...we are setting a new precedent with public schooling in New Orleans. We are setting new standards with charter schools. It is one small blessing Katrina has afforded New Orleans. For the first time I have optimism about our schools. As far as crime, unless you have a personal issue with crack cocaine, you really don't have too much concern. As for me, I don't have a crack cocaine problem, so I live my life in the city relatively worry free....
What you say about crime tends to be true, I mean I've been more nervous in Cleveland than New Orleans but the city is doing itself no favors having a murder rate that high. People are going to see it ranked in the top 5 of US highest murder rates among major cities and are going to say "No thanks" when it comes to visiting or more importantly living there.
 

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^^^Yes your right im not from New Orleans. Im just one of the many millions of people that saw the mass disaster that happened there. I would just be worried about another hurricane hitting the city after everything was built back and i had my home reconstructed. Nothing against the city or the people that live there. I know any area can have disasters. Hell we could have a 9.0 earth quake here in little Greenville, SC but its not as likely as New Orleans getting hit by another hurricane. I hope that helps to explain my reasoning a little bit. At least they are trying hard to rebuild the city and get things going again. Props to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
^^^Yes your right im not from New Orleans. Im just one of the many millions of people that saw the mass disaster that happened there. I would just be worried about another hurricane hitting the city after everything was built back and i had my home reconstructed. Nothing against the city or the people that live there. I know any area can have disasters. Hell we could have a 9.0 earth quake here in little Greenville, SC but its not as likely as New Orleans getting hit by another hurricane. I hope that helps to explain my reasoning a little bit. At least they are trying hard to rebuild the city and get things going again. Props to that.
I think your reasoning makes sense and is understandable. But, why didn't you feel this way in 2004 about New Orleans? Why didn't anybody else? Why didn't anybody that lives here? Reality check....the chances of New Orleans getting hit by a hurricane are the exact same today as they were in 2004, 2005, 2006, etc....The hits on New Orleans seem to come in 40 year cycles...Locals and "others," need to understand that the fact remains...the probabilities of New Orleans getting hit haven't changed. We got hit in a modern era..it's a wake up call. It's time to fix the levees. Nothing else really matters. Other than that, we likely won't be hearing or worrying about this until we are all retired. But, the way humankind goes, when something occurs, it is automatic for us to induce personal paranoia and share it with everyone...."what if it happens again this year..." It's stupid, but, it is the way we are. Truth be told, since New Orleans got hit, cities like New York and Houston should be more "on guard." Rarely does lightning strike twice in the exact same spot.
 

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Well I understand your points, and its easy to say "what if something were to happen again". Hopefully they do fix the levees a little better incase this happens again. Anything can happen at anytime. Everyone was definetly under prepared for such a disaster as katrina, but when disasters come at you that are on the maginitude of katrina you often are left wondering wether or not any amount of preparing can prepare you for such a horrific disaster. Your right about New York being past due for a major disaster happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I understand your points, and its easy to say "what if something were to happen again". Hopefully they do fix the levees a little better incase this happens again. Anything can happen at anytime. Everyone was definetly under prepared for such a disaster as katrina, but when disasters come at you that are on the maginitude of katrina you often are left wondering wether or not any amount of preparing can prepare you for such a horrific disaster. Your right about New York being past due for a major disaster happening.
I can absolutely guarantee you that if the levees in New Orleans were adequately prepared, as they should have been, we would not be sitting here typing on the internet about what occurred. New Orleans cried loud for over 2 decades for adequate funding to properly build the levees and it went onto deaf ears in Washington. Do a google and see what you find. It really is the truth. Funding was cut al the way back to the Reagan years. We had public officials warning year in and year out..and look what occurred. But, it seems to be the American way to respond after something terrible occurs. In spite of all that we know that has occurred and we watch the citizens of this area come back, the bottom line remains...fix the levees properly. And, to be honest, they really are....but, did we really have to have over 1400 New Orleanians drown in our streets before this levee construction occurred? I think not, but, it happened. Now we are simply moving forward. What else should we do? Would any city do anything differen? I think any community effected like this would just roll up the sleeves and continue on. That's what we're doing. I think it will be 3 to 4 years before the hurricane is wiped from our appearance. I really do. But, it will disappear from all areas in New Orleans. Just watch. I've been watching it, firsthand, since 28 days after the storm hit....
 

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Sean is correct. And, everyone else in this thread is correct as well. You all raise excellent points and concerns. We just need everyone to pay attention to what the feds...(you) are paying for, how the levees are being constructed, and how the experts critique the hurricane protection system. We are capable as Americans to do the impossible. We are a great country capable of protecting New Orleans. As a New Orleanian, I want the rest of America to watch the progress with our levees and demand the best. By 2011, we will be protected against a "100 year storm". We just need the rest of the country to keep a close eye on it and make sure that it is done properly. 1.4 million people in a relatively small metro area cannot do it alone.
 

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We have one of the most exciting public school systems unfolding in New Orleans right now it is unreal. Education leaders throughout the US are getting involved. It's a unique position to be in...we are setting a new precedent with public schooling in New Orleans. We are setting new standards with charter schools. It is one small blessing Katrina has afforded New Orleans. For the first time I have optimism about our schools. As far as crime, unless you have a personal issue with crack cocaine, you really don't have too much concern. As for me, I don't have a crack cocaine problem, so I live my life in the city relatively worry free....
Do you honestly believe that the New Orleans public school system is going to improve?

I don't doubt the sincerity to improve the "infrustructure" of the public school system. However, schools aren't made great by buildings, programs, etc. They are made great by the children that are educated within them.

Personally, I don't see much of a change, unless massive numbers of the singles in the city start having children and have them attend the public schools.
 

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I really want to move down to New Orleans but I can't find any urban planning jobs down there. Is there not a need for planners in N.O. anymore...or are companies just not posting jobs in careerbuilder, monster, and jobs.com?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I really want to move down to New Orleans but I can't find any urban planning jobs down there. Is there not a need for planners in N.O. anymore...or are companies just not posting jobs in careerbuilder, monster, and jobs.com?
Go to the bottom of this webpage and hit "contact." Tell these people what you are looking for and what you want to do.... http://www.neworleansdowntown.com/site.php Try this organization, as well... http://www.youngleadershipcouncil.org/
 

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What do people here think of the taco truck issue? I was just reading that Jefferson Parish is trying to get rid of them.

If they are inspected just like restaurants, what's wrong with taco trucks? Is it because they are run by hispanics and everyone is having fits about the illegal issue?

If they were kidney pie/bangers and mash trucks, run by British emigres, would people be complaining?

I wish we'd get some here in Augusta.
 
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