SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 89 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sprawling Time!!!


New suburbs to ease the rent squeeze across Sydney
By Vikki Campion From: The Daily Telegraph July 22, 2009 9:41PM Increase

MULTI-MILLION dollar estates, farms and rural lands will be carved up into at least five new suburbs under fresh measures to cope with Sydney's housing shortage.

Planning Minister Kristina Keneally yesterday revealed a new push to rezone 3300ha in The Hills, Blacktown, Liverpool and Camden to create entire suburbs.

The building of an estimated 20,000 homes in the north and southwest follows skyrocketing rents on family houses in the city fringe which leapt 12 per cent this year.

"We are in the very early stages of planning for new housing and employment land in the growth centres," Ms Keneally said.

Developers are happy the land will finally be unlocked, allowing mass suburban growth.

What will be cut up into subdivisions are now small scale farms and rural residential lots in 2ha packages.

Blocks of land in new release areas in Sydney could sell for $200,000.

Real estate agents said the rezoning would finally allow families to get into exclusive rural areas but fear the subdivisions will not come with enough sewerage, power or roads.

"These services just do not exist in these areas," Gracelands Real Estate agent Andy Caccamo said.

University of Western Sydney Urban Research Centre director Phil O'Neill said the State Government had already failed in providing infrastructure in the so-called growth centres, abandoning the northwest rail line while indefinitely deferring the south west line.

"Given residential development on the fringes is outpacing employment growth we can expect an abnormally high number of residents will have to commute long distances by road."

Developers cannot wait for the land to be rolled.

"Undersupply has pushed out rents to new highs," Urban Taskforce chief Aaron Gadiel said.
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/mo...ze-across-sydney/story-e6frezc0-1225753449880
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,299 Posts
Seems to be a trend in Australia at the moment in an effort to provide "affordable" housing for the here and now instead of planning for the future.

If even Auckland can take measures to prevent sprawl then I'd have thought that Australia could do the same.
It does seem that way, but overall there must be a mix of highrise and sprawl development in any city. Even the model european cities are sprawling. Building up is not always a move that is politically responsible. The NIMBY's will eat you alive , as shown in australian cities of late. Every building has a NIMBY protest group associated with it.

Auckland is extremely spread out for its size so I would think that any sprawl reduction would be a very good move. At the end of the day though, the commercial reality is what governments pander to. The needs of the perceived short term need is first looked at and if that means that more sprawl development is needed, that will happen. If highrise is tied in with that, its a good thing too. That is happening in Australian cities now. Hopefully what we end up with is a good compromise to all groups wishes.
 

·
...........
Joined
·
25,800 Posts
^^So what percentage of a city is to be sprawl to be a good mix? ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,681 Posts
This is great news, lack of supply is a major factor in housing unaffordability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
^^
This is crap news, the increasing cost of maintaining the suburban lifestyle is part of the reason the world is currently in recession.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,522 Posts
It does seem that way, but overall there must be a mix of highrise and sprawl development in any city. Even the model european cities are sprawling. Building up is not always a move that is politically responsible. The NIMBY's will eat you alive , as shown in australian cities of late. Every building has a NIMBY protest group associated with it.
There are a few model European cities, however, that have implemented absolute growth boundaries and there are also minimum requirements in many cities now for public transport provision - a definite step in the right direction if one is to sprawl. Brownfield development in Europe has also become insanely popular in many countries again thanks to the popularity of inner city living.

The guilty countries for unmitigated sprawl are France and the former Eastern Bloc these days though there are more sprawly countries overall (Denmark springs to mind most of all). Most other countries are beginning to address the issue quite strongly (especially Scandinavia) thanks to strict eco-guidelines.

I agree that some sprawl is inevitable, but nearly every single city in the world has enough sprawl to keep them satiated for a long while. Growth should be all about consolidation these days - especially in Australia/New Zealand.
 

·
#pantherpride
Joined
·
1,561 Posts
University of Western Sydney Urban Research Centre director Phil O'Neill said the State Government had already failed in providing infrastructure in the so-called growth centres, abandoning the northwest rail line while indefinitely deferring the south west line.

"Given residential development on the fringes is outpacing employment growth we can expect an abnormally high number of residents will have to commute long distances by road."
Such as Camden - the only transport infrastructure upgrades will be to existing roads such as Camden Valley Way and The Northern Road.

At least the north west has the T-way... but down here, it's everyone into their cars. Even the ones who want to commute to the city by train will have to go to Campbelltown, Glenfield or Liverpool, and means roads like Narellan Road will be even more congested than they are now.

It looks like lessons are never learnt when it comes to land release planning in Sydney. It really is a frustrating profession to be in sometimes.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,681 Posts
^^
This is crap news, the increasing cost of maintaining the suburban lifestyle is part of the reason the world is currently in recession.
I though we had a huge undersupply in Australia from lack of building houses, hence the high prices? Isn’t that what the property industry likes to say? We are all renovators apparently no? So if there has been little supply built to date to, say that our obsession with new supply caused the recession sounds, well, wrong doesn't it.

For example, in QLD there has been precious little land release, to the point that developers complain to the govt about it as a serious issue, so let’s not try and spin this as some kind of Californian sprawl when in fact supply has been kept on a such a tight lease that it’s ended up causing the most imbalanced house prices in the developed world relative to income, an absurd situation putting whole generations in this country into financial hardship, and yet you still have these self centred people on the sidelines shouting 'tighter tighter', unbelievable!
 

·
derp
Joined
·
10,274 Posts
self centred people on the sidelines shouting 'tighter tighter',
oh teh irony

i know you aren't a dumbshit Locke, I have seen enough of your posts to know you are reasonably intelligent so I would appreciate it if you kept the arguments to facts rather than strawmen arguments and insults

you have been informed in a previous thread that comments like this are untrue
 

·
skyscraper connoisseur
Joined
·
6,206 Posts
Sydney has to go upwards or else our economy and society will just self-destruct from severe oil dependency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
I think sprawl is acceptable in the smaller state capitals (adelaide, perth and brisbane) but now that Sydney and Melbourne are reaching enourmous sizes, should be stopped. Suburban houses are suitable for families, but for other demographics efforts should be made to shift them to highrise development located close to public transport and large arterial roads.
 

·
Galactic Ruler
Joined
·
6,855 Posts
^^

Nope ... suburban housing is no longer suitable for families either. It's time people realised it's simply not sustainable for the future growth of the city. High and medium density housing is the only option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I though we had a huge undersupply in Australia from lack of building houses, hence the high prices? Isn’t that what the property industry likes to say? We are all renovators apparently no? So if there has been little supply built to date to, say that our obsession with new supply caused the recession sounds, well, wrong doesn't it.

For example, in QLD there has been precious little land release, to the point that developers complain to the govt about it as a serious issue, so let’s not try and spin this as some kind of Californian sprawl when in fact supply has been kept on a such a tight lease that it’s ended up causing the most imbalanced house prices in the developed world relative to income, an absurd situation putting whole generations in this country into financial hardship, and yet you still have these self centred people on the sidelines shouting 'tighter tighter', unbelievable!
While allowing more sprawl helps in reducing house prices, so does apartment building.

The cost of living in the suburbs is increasing in the long term. You cannot deny that. Increased costs (mainly transportation) offset any of the gains made by reduced housing costs.

I think sprawl is acceptable in the smaller state capitals (adelaide, perth and brisbane) but now that Sydney and Melbourne are reaching enourmous sizes, should be stopped. Suburban houses are suitable for families, but for other demographics efforts should be made to shift them to highrise development located close to public transport and large arterial roads.
My family used to live in an apartment with no problems. It is alot easier for the kids, they can go to places themselves, rather than depending on the parents to drop them off everywhere.
 

·
exto, extare, extiti
Joined
·
420 Posts
^^

Nope ... suburban housing is no longer suitable for families either. It's time people realised it's simply not sustainable for the future growth of the city. High and medium density housing is the only option.
Unless you can afford a 5 bedder in Mosman.
 

·
Sexiest Creature
Joined
·
688 Posts
:nuts:

Sydney sprawls with more land releases said:
23 July 2009 | by Gemma Battenbough

The NSW state government has announced yet another round of land release in Sydney’s outer suburbs, contributing to the perpetuation of urban sprawl that is blighting the city.

Since 2005, around 40,000 lots have been released in growth centres with nearly 20,000 lots already rezoned.
Farm and rural land will be carved up in this next phase of land release in growth centres in Sydney’s south west and north west.

“We are in the very early stages of planning for new housing and employment land in the growth centres,” Keneally said.

Box Hill, Box Hill Industrial and Schofields precincts in the north west, and North Leppington and Austral precincts in the south west are slated for land release.

Around 1,400ha of land in the Hills Shire and Blacktown areas is earmarked for new dwellings, along with 200ha of employment land.

Liverpool and Camden councils will be approached about the release of 1,700ha of land for new houses.

The development industry is welcoming the move.

“We are already planning sufficient land supplies in the south west growth centre to meet housing needs in the area for the next 25 years,” Keneally said.

“The government is focusing on delivering land to meet demand in the south west growth centres, and delivering infrastructure to support that such as the South West Rail Line.

“We have allocated $804 million this year for stage 1 of the South West Rail Line.”

Keneally said given the focus on providing homes close to infrastructure and jobs, investigations will cease into a proposed housing release in Macarthur South, 25 kilometres south of Campbelltown.

Macarthur South, if allowed to fully develop, would have seen up to 62,000 houses built in an area of about 17,000 hectares. The area is about the same size as the south west growth centre.
I heard somewhere though that Macarthur South got knocked back due to the excessive cost of providing sufficient infrastructure. From looking at the map that seems like it'd be around the junction of the Hume Highway and Picton road. Although, I already saw quite alot of development around there last year when driving past.
 
1 - 20 of 89 Posts
Top