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Discussion Starter #22
Here are notes about New Urbanism from my architecture class:

A type of compact neighborhood design
pioneered by Miami architects Andres Duany
and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk. New Urbanism
replaces the typical suburban subdivision with
more diverse environments which mix
residential and commercial buildings
hypothetically providing a walkable community
where people live, work and play.
 

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Jakriborg, Sweden

Jakriborg by Anders Bengtsson, auf Flickr

Jakriborg 3 by Peter Hillhagen, auf Flickr

Jakriborg by Anders Bengtsson, auf Flickr


Poundbury, UK

Poundbury by diamond geezer, auf Flickr

Poundbury_ALL0068 by JonathanLClarke, auf Flickr

Poundbury_ALL0103 by JonathanLClarke, auf Flickr


Brandevoort, Netherlands

brandevoort, Helmond by Gerben of the lake, auf Flickr

Brandevoort by Jeroen Mul, auf Flickr

Brandevoort by Jeroen Mul, auf Flickr + https://flic.kr/p/rqakyU


There's various more New Urbanist settlements like that in Europe, all new.
Like Le-Plessis Robinson near Paris. But nothing's like the theme park stuff you find in China.
 

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Fabulous additions Notgnirracen! Thank you.
I just love New Urbanism when done right. It so often goes hand in hand with wonderful, sustainable and human-scale architecture. Developing countries should use it way more often, they are the ones that create new cities all the time - and do so much wrong all the time.

Let's keep this thread alive, it's an amazing topic! :eek:kay:
 

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The road is a shared space. There's hardly any great traffic, as it's a mostly pedestrianised settlement. It's an alternative to single family home sprawl you see anywhere else. And it's pretty good in that regard, creating qualities of a small town that is much older.

Europeans need to rediscover the qualities of their classical urbanism. Modernism was a great failure in urban planning mostly.
 

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Developing countries should use it way more often, they are the ones that create new cities all the time - and do so much wrong all the time.
Yep, that makes me think of a plan by Duany Plater-Zyberk for the gradual development of a city block in Haiti. The proposal was made shortly after the earthquake, but it hasn't been implemented.

City Block

Port au Prince, Haiti











 

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The road is a shared space. There's hardly any great traffic, as it's a mostly pedestrianised settlement. It's an alternative to single family home sprawl you see anywhere else. And it's pretty good in that regard, creating qualities of a small town that is much older.
Yeah I'm not having this "sharing" thanks. I have a three year old and I don't want to walk him between cars. I live in a similar residential area with tiny sidewalks and little traffic and I know how dangerous it is, even if cars feel "rare".
But I agree that had I not been a parent I too wouldn't be able to notice the negatives I now see in that pic. It's a bit counterintuitive - for example, so far the most dangerous places I have experienced with my child are pedestrian public spaces with bycicles allowed.
The place we're talking about is easily fixable, on paper - the road can be made one direction, with one lane for driving and one lane dedicated to parking in proper parking spots, which would let the sidewalks free.
 

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Well, yeah, that could be a solution. As a parent myself I know that feeling. Seeing danger everywhere doesn't help your kid though. They just need to run around and discover the world and its ups and flaws themself at times.

Though they shouldn't widen such a road. I guess they wanted to create a somewhat natural, organic feeling, like you'd find in any older small town of the region. They did well in this regard, concerning the atmosphere.
 

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^ I think their concern was entirely aesthetic and in that regards it is a success. As for kid-friendly urbanism, I agree with your general feeling but not with the particular idea of letting the kid run around without thinking of potential dangers, a middle ground can be found between that and not letting him run because of the dangers - which I am sure you too can agree with.
 
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