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Plane by plane, New York greets Puerto Ricans displaced by hurricane

Jonathan Allen

NEW YORK (Reuters) - There were only a few minutes left before baggage carousel No. 4 jolted to life at John F. Kennedy International Airport, soon to be ringed with people coming from Puerto Rico on one-way tickets they never would have bought if not for the hurricane.
Emily Pagan, a New York state government official, greets and help orients people arriving from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, U.S. October 19, 2017.

Moving at a canter, Emily Pagan and three colleagues from various New York state government agencies carted their fold-up table halfway down the Terminal 5 arrivals hall, setting it up by the carousel against a pillar.
They had volunteered to help orient the latest batch of the tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans that New York officials estimate will flee from the lingering devastation wrought a month ago by Hurricane Maria.
Many are expected to stay for months - or years - and some forever, in a largely reluctant wave of migration abetted by the spare mattresses and couches of the one million Puerto Ricans who already call the New York area home.
“A lot of them are saying they came to start a new life here because they lost everything,” Pagan said on her third day of greeting arrivals from the U.S. territory, where the power grid and water supply remain in disarray.
She tried to make the makeshift help desk look nice, centering a bowl of mints and squaring off the piles of leaflets about health and job resources.
A clipboard wedged into her elbow, Pagan hurried up to anyone who looked like they were waiting for relatives from the island, flipping between English and Spanish: “Hi, I‘m Emily, and I represent the state.”
Lissette Feliciano, who had driven down from Bridgeport, Connecticut, was among those grateful for a leaflet. Then bags began thudding onto the carousel and the automatic doors slid open to admit her 10-year-old nephew, sporting an Incredible Hulk T-shirt, alongside her youngest sister, Madeline Feliciano.
The nephew, Carlos, grinned as he was nuzzled by his aunt. It was their first time leaving the island. They never expected an airplane cabin would be so cold, he said, shivering.
“I‘m so-so,” his mother said, looking daunted.
Many Puerto Rican families are divided between those who prefer the island’s warmth and those who cannot understand why one would not move to the mainland’s hustle, as Lissette did seven years ago. But the storm put those disagreements on hold.
“Four days, no running water,” Madeline said of their hometown, Isabela. She did not know when they could return.
Emily Pagan, a New York state government official, greets and help orients people arriving from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, U.S. October 19, 2017. Photo taken October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Allen
“They’ll stay with me until we can find something for her,” said Lissette, who had already found a bilingual school for Carlos.
They headed out, with Madeline and Carlos added to the tally on Pagan’s clipboard.
People gravitated toward Pagan and her purple top bearing the logo of New York’s Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, where she normally works as a compliance officer.
Born in Puerto Rico, Pagan, 42, listened to the accounts of each new arrival that made her beautiful native island seem unfamiliar: no water, no power, no green left on the tropical trees, no sort of place where a child or grandparent could thrive.
Emily Pagan, a New York state government official, greets and help orients people arriving from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, U.S. October 19, 2017. Photo taken October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Allen
“It’s heartbreaking,” she said between flights. But she tried to put on a welcoming face, slipping lollipops to children before moving on to the next family. She was yet to meet anyone without relatives to stay with, but younger adults seemed worried about finding jobs in a place where they had never planned to live.
Pagan cooed at the green eyes of a 7-year-old boy called Jayden with a Transformers backpack. “You speak English!” she said after the boy squirmed at the compliment. “You understand everything I say!”
Jayden’s father, Joemil Ramirez, was returning to New York City, where he was raised, for only three weeks, partly for its functional telephone network. Much of that time he expected to spend making calls trying to salvage his hurricane-ravaged restaurant in Rincon. But when he returned, he would be leaving behind Jayden, who would move in with the boy’s mother, from whom Ramirez was separated.
“There’s no place for him to be, no school,” Ramirez said. “It’s a situation I wouldn’t give to my own worst enemy.”
Genoveva Mendez, 48, watched the carousel from her wheelchair. She had been undergoing physical therapy three times a week following a stroke, but Maria halted that.
“We had to force her,” said her daughter, Jessenia Lalama. Mendez had refused the offer of a ticket to New York for weeks.
“I like the island, the island’s beautiful,” Mendez said, becoming tearful at the memory of her home before the hurricane.
When the hall emptied, a lone suitcase remained on the carousel as Pagan and her colleagues carried their table back to the corner, ready to greet the next day’s flights.
 

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Hundreds of NYC-Area Lawyers Volunteering to Assist Puerto Rico

The New York City office of LatinoJustice is sending lawyers on a fact-finding mission to Puerto Rico next week in advance of a larger effort to dispatch hundreds of lawyers to help residents following Hurricane Maria.

By Susan DeSantis October 20, 2017

The New York City office of LatinoJustice is sending lawyers on a fact-finding mission to Puerto Rico next week in advance of a larger effort to dispatch hundreds of lawyers to help residents file insurance claims, seek disaster assistance and get compensated for lost wages following Hurricane Maria.
Some of the 600 volunteers who have volunteered to help the hurricane victims are gathering Monday night at CUNY Law School in Long Island City to learn the basics of labor and employment issues, housing and tenant disputes, insurance coverage and disaster relief. The organization is also preparing videos to help train more lawyers and law students.
LatinoJustice is primarily seeking lawyers who are fluent in Spanish because 60 percent of island residents either do not speak English at all or do not speak it well, according to the most recent Census.
Juan Cartagena, a New York City lawyer who is president and general counsel for LatinoJustice, said the fact-finding mission is needed because the organization wants to time its larger trip in a way that won’t deplete scarce resources in Puerto Rico.
“Still today 80 percent of the island doesn’t have electricity,” Cartagena said. “When can we go when we’re not creating a drain on the people of Puerto Rico—on the food, water and power. At the same time we have to be sure that people know their legal rights.”
A working group has been formed in Puerto Rico to lead the effort. It includes the clinics and pro bono student groups from all three law schools, the Puerto Rico Bar Association and the Civil Rights Commission. In the United States, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, ProBono.net, the Louisiana Civil Justice Center, Columbia University Law School’s Pro Bono student group and the NYC Bar Association are participating.
During the fact-finding mission, Natasha Bannan, a New York City lawyer who is associate counsel of LatinoJustice, will determine when the lawyers should be deployed and where to set up offices so that the lawyers will have access to electricity and the internet.
For Cartagena, the mission is partly personal. He wasn’t able to speak to his family in Puerto Rico until two-and-a-half weeks after the hurricane. A month after the storm, he knows his father is safe but still hasn’t been able to talk directly to him.
Cartagena is concerned about the rising death toll in Puerto Rico caused by the lack of access to the emergency 911 system, the lack of electricity to keep insulin refrigerated and the absence of safe drinking water.
“There’s going to be a lot of examination of how the response has been and how it could be done better. I’m sure the more we get on the ground there there might be other potential sources of redress,” he said.


The New York City office of LatinoJustice is sending lawyers on a fact-finding mission to Puerto Rico next week in advance of a larger effort to dispatch hundreds of lawyers to help residents file insurance claims, seek disaster assistance and get compensated for lost wages following Hurricane Maria.
Some of the 600 volunteers who have volunteered to help the hurricane victims are gathering Monday night at CUNY Law School in Long Island City to learn the basics of labor and employment issues, housing and tenant disputes, insurance coverage and disaster relief. The organization is also preparing videos to help train more lawyers and law students.
LatinoJustice is primarily seeking lawyers who are fluent in Spanish because 60 percent of island residents either do not speak English at all or do not speak it well, according to the most recent Census.
Juan Cartagena, a New York City lawyer who is president and general counsel for LatinoJustice, said the fact-finding mission is needed because the organization wants to time its larger trip in a way that won’t deplete scarce resources in Puerto Rico.
“Still today 80 percent of the island doesn’t have electricity,” Cartagena said. “When can we go when we’re not creating a drain on the people of Puerto Rico—on the food, water and power. At the same time we have to be sure that people know their legal rights.”
A working group has been formed in Puerto Rico to lead the effort. It includes the clinics and pro bono student groups from all three law schools, the Puerto Rico Bar Association and the Civil Rights Commission. In the United States, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, ProBono.net, the Louisiana Civil Justice Center, Columbia University Law School ’s Pro Bono student group and the NYC Bar Association are participating.
During the fact-finding mission, Natasha Bannan, a New York City lawyer who is associate counsel of LatinoJustice, will determine when the lawyers should be deployed and where to set up offices so that the lawyers will have access to electricity and the internet.
For Cartagena, the mission is partly personal. He wasn’t able to speak to his family in Puerto Rico until two-and-a-half weeks after the hurricane. A month after the storm, he knows his father is safe but still hasn’t been able to talk directly to him.
Cartagena is concerned about the rising death toll in Puerto Rico caused by the lack of access to the emergency 911 system, the lack of electricity to keep insulin refrigerated and the absence of safe drinking water.
“There’s going to be a lot of examination of how the response has been and how it could be done better. I’m sure the more we get on the ground there there might be other potential sources of redress,” he said.
 

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Mayor de Blasio Announces NYC Service Center to Support Individuals & Families Recovering From Hurricane Maria, Irma, & Harvey

October 16, 2017
NYC service center will provide information and assistance for individuals affected by recent hurricanes
NEW YORK—Mayor de Blasio announced today that a service center will open next week to support displaced individuals and families from Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other Caribbean islands following recent hurricanes. The center will be open starting on Thursday, October 19 at the Julia De Burgos Latino Cultural Center located at 1680 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan.
“New York City will help those affected by recent hurricanes in any way we can. We’ve been sending donations and emergency responders to affected areas, and now we’re setting up a central location to help displaced people in our city receive essential services and assistance,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio.
“This is a humanitarian crisis the likes our city has ever experienced and we must do everything we can to help our fellow Puerto Ricans who have given so much to our city and to our country,” said Speaker Melissa Mark Viverito. “Where the federal government has come up short, New York has always stepped up and it is no different in this case. This city is prepared to help Boricuas from the island with the resources and providing essential services during this dire time of need”
The City’s service center will offer in-person support and access to services to individuals affected by the hurricanes, and will be open from 9 AM to 5 PM Monday through Friday, 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturday, and 1 PM to 5 PM on Sunday. The City of New York is urging individuals planning to visit the service centers to make an appointment beginning October 18 by visiting nyc.gov or call 311. (Note: the center will be closed Saturday, October 21.)
New York City government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and community-based organizations will be on-site to help connect families and individuals to critical services, including enrollment in public benefits and health insurance, food assistance, and mental health counseling.
Services provided at the center include but are not limited to:

  • Department of Social Services will assist with enrollment in SNAP benefits, cash assistance, and public health insurance, and help connect people with emergency food assistance. English and Spanish speakers will be available to assist with enrollment.
  • Department of Health and Mental Hygiene will provide mental health counseling, health insurance support, emergency pharmacy assistance and will refer individuals to medical care in collaboration with NYC Health + Hospitals. They will also provide information on immunization assistance targeted toward school enrollment.
  • Department for the Aging will provide meals to seniors, assist in case management, and assist with senior employment.
  • Department of Education will provide information and assistance for displaced students.
  • Human Resource Administration’s Office of Civil Justice will convene several legalproviders to provide legal consultation to individuals in need.
  • American Red Cross of Greater New York will assist in disaster relief management — including referrals, distribution of emergency supplies, and applying for assistance — and mental health counseling.
  • Animal Care and Control andthe American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals will provide veterinary care and pet supplies.
  • The New York Disaster Interfaith Services will provide spiritual care to those in need.
“New York City is home to one of the largest Caribbean diasporas in the United States, and we want to ensure that our fellow Americans from Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands are accepted and integrated fully into our community. My administration will work hand in hand with Mayor de Blasio so that Brooklyn can support families affected by these hurricanes,” said Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams.
"As we've unfortunately learned all too well here in New York, few things are more critical during and after a crisis than clear information and cross-agency coordination," said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. "Cross agency service centers offering one stop shopping and ability to cut through red tape may not seem like much against the backdrop of the terrible tragedy unfolding in Puerto Rico and the other areas affected by recent hurricanes, but they can make a huge difference in the lives of the affected families."
“Those individuals and families affected by these natural disasters need our help, and that includes being prepared to assist those who decided to leave their homes and come to New York City. This service center will provide those seeking refuge from these disasters with a one-stop shop for critical services, and I appreciate Mayor de Blasio’s efforts to make life a little bit easier for those who are being forced from their homes due to these natural disasters,” said Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
U.S. Representative Nydia M. Velázquez said, "The bond between the Island of Puerto Rico and New York is deeply rooted, and over one million Puerto Ricans call New York home. Let's be clear, Puerto Ricans will always have a true friend and ally in New York and we will continue to assist our fellow U.S. citizens on the Island. I'm proud of what the City and regular New Yorkers are doing to help Puerto Rico and other hurricane-affected areas. I commend the Mayor for his leadership in this area.”
“I commend Mayor de Blasio on today’s announcement to open the NYC service center to support individuals and families who have been affected by the recent unprecedented storms we’ve witnessed so far this hurricane season,” said U.S. Representative Adriano Espaillat. “Connecting families and individuals to critical services through a centralized hub where they can sign up for public benefits, health insurance, food assistance, and mental health programs, puts us one step closer to helping bring about some resemblance of normalcy for displaced individuals as they work to rebuild their lives.”
“Thousands of Puerto Ricans will be relocating to New York having lost everything on the island. The new NYC Service Center will help facilitate their transition to a new city. Once again, New York City stands ready to help Puerto Ricans in their time of need,” said U.S. Representative Jose Serrano.
"Once again, our City rises to the occasion in order to provide our fellow Americans affected by Hurricanes Irma, Harvey and Maria the assistance they require in their time of need," said State Senator Gustavo Rivera. "I applaud the ongoing efforts of our City's administration that, unlike the lackluster and in some cases negligent response from the federal government, continues to set up safety nets for those displaced by these recent natural disasters. I urge my fellow New Yorkers to spread the word about this service center so that those who need the assistance are able to receive it immediately."
Assembly Assistant Speaker Felix W Ortiz said, “We must do all we can to assist our friends and relatives recovering from Hurricanes Irma, Harvey and Maria. In addition to our ongoing efforts to send supplies, medicine and food to Puerto Rico, Mexico and other communities seeking to recover, we should also be prepared to welcome those without homes to New York. Friendly service centers are a step in the right direction to help our brothers and sisters. Our efforts are far from over."
"The recent natural disasters in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, Texas, and Mexico have left so many without the basic resources needed to survive. I am proud of East Harlem, New York City and the State for remaining committed to helping the victims of these tragedies," said Assembly Member Robert J. Rodriguez. "The new Service Center will connect displaced victims with life-saving services to help get them back on their feet."
“I just returned from a week in some of the hardest hit areas in the mountainous regions of Puerto Rico. I met with people who lost everything, received little or no outside assistance and have been as self-sufficient as possible. As New Yorkers we are obligated to help fellow Americans who are traumatized make a safe transition and avoid further trauma,” said Council Member Fernando Cabrera.
“Our American family in Puerto Rico deserves all of the support we can give,” said Council Member Rafael Espinal. “As a New Yorker I know firsthand the impact Puerto Ricans have had on our culture, economy and values. I commend Mayor de Blasio for staying committed to providing aid and doing all New York City can to step up in this time of need.”
“It is a proud day for New York as we establish a new Open Service Center for the victims of Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey. Millions of families have been affected, homes destroyed, and livelihoods lost. It is never easy to pick up the pieces when we lose so much, as an individual or as a community. Nor is it easy to pick up and move to a new place in the wake of such a disaster. This new Center sends a clear message to the victims of these hurricanes. You are welcome in New York City. As government agencies and non-profits work to integrate fellow citizens, we must all remember to make newcomers feel welcome. With a dangerously delayed response, and grave uncertainty about how much longer the Trump Administration will provide aid to victims in Puerto Rico, I ask that everyone contribute whatever they can to help the victims. It is sad that the President may forsake our brothers and sisters in Puerto Rico, but let it be clear that the people of New York will never do so. We stand together,” said Council Member Carlos Menchaca.
"Our city is taking proactive measures to assist those most impacted by the recent natural disasters. I find it deeply gratifying that Mayor de Blasio is utilizing every resource at his disposal to help displaced families and individuals. The opening of a New York City service center will advance our relief efforts and provide vital support during this recovery process,” said Council Member Annabel Palma.
Council Member Rafael Salamanca said, “I’m proud to call myself a New Yorker as we work to lead the charge on providing relief to all of those effected by the hurricanes,” said Council Member Rafael Salamanca, Jr. “People are still hurting – in Puerto Rico, USVI, in Florida and in Texas. It’s why I’m encouraging everyone who may know a victim of the hurricanes to direct them to these great resources.”
Council Member Ritchie Torres said, “I want to thank the Mayor for committing our City’s agencies to supporting families displaced by these horrible disasters. We must continue to show our fellow Americans and the world that New York City will be a lasting bastion of support for those in need.”

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(212) 788-2958
 

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Gobernador de Nueva York cataloga inaceptable respuesta federal sobre energía



>Eric Rojas/EL VOCERO
El gobernador de Nueva York Andrew Cuomo catalogó de inaceptable la respuesta federal a la emergencia de Puerto Rico, al abordar el tema de la energía.
Cuomo, quien regresó a Puerto Rico cinco semanas después de su primera visita, luego del paso del huracán María, no podía creer que todavía la mayoría de los ciudadanos no contaran con el servicio de energía.
“Estar aquí cinco semanas después y que todavía no tengan energía…Los resultados hablan por sí mismos. Es inaceptable e inadecuado. Tienes personas que literalmente están en una situación de vida o muerte, así que la respuesta no es lo que necesita ser”, sostuvo en una conferencia de prensa junto al gobernador Ricardo Rosselló.
“Cuerpo de Ingenieros: Nosotros tenemos brigadas de Nueva York que podrían estar disponibles en días. Hay algo que se llama acuerdo de ayuda mutua donde pueden ejecutar un acuerdo de ayuda mutua y podemos enviar literalmente cientos de equipos de poder dentro de unos días. El resultado es inaceptable”, puntualizó.
Cuomo también habló sobre el nombramiento de Noel Zamot, oficial de transformación de la Autoridad de Energía Eléctrica (AEE), nombrado ayer por la Junta Federal de Control Fiscal.
“Lo último que quieres hacer es confundir la línea de mando o los niveles de burocracia”, afirmó el mandatario neoyorquino.
 

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NY governor visits Puerto Rico, pledges power, water aid

By The Associated Press on October 26, 2017

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Thursday that his state will help restore power in Puerto Rico and also improve access to clean water as the U.S. territory struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria.
During a visit to the island, Cuomo pledged $1 million through the Empire State Clean Water Fund to buy water filtration systems and said he would deploy a tactical team in November that specializes in the supervision of transmission and distribution system recovery.
It is the second time that the New York Democrat has visited Puerto Rico since the storm, and he criticized the federal response.

“To be here five weeks later and people still don’t have power, people still don’t have water, the results speak for themselves,” he said. “It’s unacceptable. It’s inadequate. It’s a life-and-death situation.”
The storm hit Puerto Rico as a Category 4 hurricane Sept. 20 with winds up to 155 mph. It killed 51 people, flattened Puerto Rico’s electrical system, decimated thousands of homes and left tens of thousands unemployed, many of whom have left for the U.S. mainland in search of jobs and to enroll their children in school. About 75 percent of the island remains without power. Roughly 25 percent is without water, and officials warn that those who do have water service still need to boil it before drinking it.
“There’s been a different standard that has subliminally been imposed,” Cuomo said. “It would not be acceptable if any of the 50 states went through this … It would be immediate outrage.”

Taking aim at comments by President Donald Trump, Cuomo said rebuilding Puerto Rico will take years and billions of dollars of federal funding. Two weeks ago, Trump tweeted: “We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever!”
The governor traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico last month to survey hurricane damage.
He noted the approaching fifth anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, which lashed New York City and Long Island.
“We rebuilt a New York that is better and stronger than it was before Hurricane Sandy,” he said. “That should be the attitude in Puerto Rico.”
New York already has sent millions of bottles of water, baby wipes, diapers and other goods to Puerto Rico, and it has deployed hundreds of National Guard military police, engineers and soldiers and also volunteer medical staff.
Cuomo said he also could send hundreds of power crews to Puerto Rico within days if the island’s government activated a mutual aid agreement, which it has not.
Instead, Gov. Ricardo Rosello’s administration awarded a $300 million contract to a small Montana company called Whitefish that has sparked outrage and led members of Congress from both parties to demand an investigation. The company is located in the hometown of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.
On Thursday, Sen. Rob Bishop, the Utah Republican who heads the Senate Natural Resources Committee, sent the director of Puerto Rico’s Electric Power Authority a letter demanding documents, including those related to the contract with Whitefish and others that show what authority the agency has to deviate from normal contracting processes. The letter also was signed by Rep. Bruce Westerman, an Arkansas Republican who is chairman of the House subcommittee on oversight and investigations.
Rossello said he has asked for an audit on the contract awarded by power company director Ricardo Ramos.
“I can’t make an assessment right now on how effective they’re being,” he said of Whitefish workers, adding that he sees them working hard across the island.
Rossello also said he will not hesitate to act if any wrongdoing is found: “There will be hell to pay.”
 

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New York to send additional utility crews to Puerto Rico

By Brett Samuels - 10/29/17 05:25 PM EDT 133
9,876


© Greg Nash

The state of New York is sending further assistance help restore power in Puerto Rico after the island announced it was canceling its contract with Whitefish Energy, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Sunday.
"New York is deploying additional utility crews and equipment to help restore power in Puerto Rico," Cuomo tweeted.
New York is deploying additional utility crews and equipment to help restore power in Puerto Rico.
— Andrew Cuomo (@NYGovCuomo) October 29, 2017
“70% of PR is w/o power,” Cuomo added. “If it was any state on the mainland, it would be a national crisis. NY won’t leave until power is fully restored.”
Puerto Rico’s state-run electric utility earlier Sunday said it was canceling its $300-million contract with Whitefish Energy amid mounting controversy over the deal. Gov. Ricardo Rosselló had asked the utility to cancel the deal at a press conference on Sunday, and called for an investigation into the recruitment process for emergency services.
The contract drew scrutiny, with critics pointing to Whitefish having only two full-time employees when the storm hit the island. In addition, the company is located in the hometown of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, though he has said he had nothing to do with the contract.
New York already deployed resources to Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, but Rosselló said in a press conference that the island would coordinate with New York and Florida to reinforce brigades.
 

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Gobernador de Nueva York enviará 350 trabajadores para restablecer el sistema eléctrico

Thu, Nov 2, 2017
Economía


Foto suministrada

Por redacción de Sin Comillas

El gobernador de Nueva York, Andrew Cuomo, enviará un equipo de 350 personas para trabajar en la restauración del sistema eléctrico. Además, llegarán 220 camiones canasto y otro equipo especial para reparar el sistema eléctrico.
Nueva York también enviará un “Tactical Power Restoration Team” que incluye 28 ingenieros y 15 expertos en evaluación de daños, para ayudar a supervisar y coordinar la restauración del sistema de distribución en las 27 secciones de la red eléctrica.
 

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NYU to take 50 students from PR for spring semester

Written by Contributor // November 9, 2017 // Hurricane María


NYU is offering free tuition, housing, meal plan, and health insurance for undergraduates whose studies in Puerto Rico were disrupted by hurricanes.

NYU President Andrew Hamilton announced that the college would admit a special cohort of undergraduate students currently enrolled in Puerto Rican colleges whose education was disrupted by the hurricanes that hit the island in September.
NYU will cover their tuition for the spring 2018 semester, as well as housing in a student residence hall, a meal plan, and enrollment in NYU’s Student Health Insurance plan.
Applications open today for the NYU Hurricane María Assistance Program, and will remain open through Dec. 15, 2017.
“New York City has a deep relationship with Puerto Rico, and so does NYU,” said Hamilton. “Through our Faculty Resource Network, we have worked closely with Puerto Rican universities for many years, and feel a strong sense of connection to the higher education community there.”
“We are pleased to make it possible for at least some of Puerto Rico’s college students to be able to carry on their studies here while their home institutions recover,” he said. “We look forward to welcoming them to our campus in the spring.”
The students will be able to take credit-bearing classes in any NYU undergraduate school, college, or program, provided the class has seats available and the student meets course prerequisites.
The university is planning for a cohort of 50 students, though stands prepared to expand the program as capacity allows.
Students will be responsible for the cost of transportation to and from New York, book and other course materials, and any other living expenses. To ensure that the program does not negatively affect schools in Puerto Rico, students will be expected to pay their regular spring tuition to their home campus—although they will attend NYU at no cost.
In 2005, NYU undertook a similar effort to help students displaced from universities in Gulf states in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
 

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Governor Andrew Cuomo

Like This Page · 11 hrs ·

Today New York sent another 160 public and private utility experts to Puerto Rico to help restore the power grid.

Later this week we’re sending another 220 utility workers and more than 180 additional vehicles along with special equipment, to help ongoing relief efforts.

We will continue to do all that we can to support our brothers and sisters in Puerto Rico as they work to rebuild stronger and better than before.

 
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