SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 678 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just saw this while reading the morning news: JPMorgan Plans New Manhattan Headquarters for 15,000 Workers. Source: Bloomberg.

The new building could be as much as 500 feet taller than the current building 270 Park Ave, which is 707 feet (215m). That would yield a 1200 footer!

Excerpt: JPMorgan Chase & Co. plans to build a headquarters in midtown Manhattan that would combine other offices into a new, taller building for 15,000 employees on Park Avenue.

The 2.5 million-square-foot (232,000-square-meter) building would be the first major project under New York City’s Midtown East rezoning plan, which encourages new office construction in the area, the bank and Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement Wednesday. JPMorgan’s current headquarters at the same site, 270 Park Ave., is an “outdated facility” that was designed in the late 1950s for about 3,500 employees, the company said.

The headquarters could be between 70 and 75 stories, depending on how wide its footprint is, said a person with knowledge of the company’s plans. The current structure is 52 stories. The new building, which has yet to be designed, could be as much as 500 feet (150 meters) taller than the current headquarters, said the person, who asked not to be identified because details of the plans haven’t been publicly disclosed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
I suppose I miss-named this thread. My apologies.
All good, thanks for getting a thread on this up and running (I was going to open one up myself when the news dropped). I shot a message to the admins to update the title to fit the standard format, but FYI, you can always edit the title in your first post if you created the thread.

More coverage from Curbed NY this morning:

The first major project to be developed under the new Midtown East rezoning plan is here: Mayor Bill de Blasio and JPMorgan Chase head Jamie Dimon announced today that the company will demolish its old headquarters at 270 Park Avenue, and construct a new, 2.5 million-square-foot building in its place.

“This is our plan for East Midtown in action,” De Blasio said in a statement. “Good jobs, modern buildings and concrete investments that will make East Midtown stronger for the hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who work here.”

Currently, Chase occupies the former Union Carbide Building on Park Avenue between 47th and 48th streets. The 52-story skyscraper was built by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961. But Chase’s new HQ will be quite a bit bigger: According to The New York Times, the new tower will rise 70 stories, and could be as much as 500 feet taller than the existing building—which itself is just over 700 feet tall.

Chase had previously been eyeing the Hudson Yards area for a new global headquarters, which would have been spread across two skyscrapers, but the plan ultimately fell through.

As part of the Midtown East rezoning plan, developers are permitted to buy unused air rights from neighboring landmarked buildings in order to go taller, an avenue that Chase intends to pursue for this new building. According to the Times, this could lead to as much as $40 million for infrastructure improvements to nearby streets and sidewalks.

“This is a true win-win-win,” deputy mayor Alicia Glen said in a statement. “The City of New York retains a major company and its employment base, the surrounding community sees improvements in its public spaces, and JPMorgan Chase will have a new headquarters that helps the firm compete for decades to come.”

A design team for the new building has not yet been announced, but the city anticipates that construction will begin in 2019, with the whole thing expected to take five years to complete.
I was a little surprised to see that JPMC wasn't going to move into one of the new westside towers or the WTC, but when you're one of the biggest, wealthiest companies in the world, you can afford to own a building built to your own specifications.

While I'm excited to see a supertall rise here so soon after the re-zoning, I am a little disappointed that a classic International Style building will have to come down to make way.



Here's some insight into the building from the Skidmore Owings & Merrill site:

Built for the Union Carbide Corporation, this sleek tower, built over railroad tracks leading out of Grand Central Terminal, was unlike its neighbors on Park Avenue when it opened. Not only was it set back in a plaza, but it also stood out for its innovative structural engineering design, which responded to the constraints of the site.

Because of its location, the 52-story tower could have no basement under most of its bulk, and its column-footings had to be poured between active rail tracks. To counteract train vibrations — more than 500 trains passed by each day — all columns were set on vibration pads. Moreover, SOM designed the building so an underground pedestrian passage to Grand Central could be installed.

The tower's outer skin consisted of approximately 11 acres of glass, stainless steel mullions, and black sandwich panels. Inside, the ceiling system integrated lighting, air-conditioning, and connections for movable partitions — a cutting-edge feature at the time. Adjoining the tower was an annex that contained an employee cafeteria and exhibition hall.

In 1983, SOM renovated the building for a new tenant: the Manufacturers Hanover Corporation. The project presented the unique challenge of retrofitting a classic, modern skyscraper to accommodate new program requirements, energy conservation, and contemporary technology. SOM's involvement with the building continued into the 1990s, when the firm provided design services for the merger of Chemical Bank with Manufacturers Hanover Trust.
I think the construction of this tower will be a fascinating watch, considering it's over the top of the GCT tracks.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,834 Posts
I'm hoping that the tower portion will remain and will be incorporated into the new HQ while the much shorter portion of the building fronting Madison Avenue, which has a large footprint itself, will be demolished for the new tower. 270 Park is a midcentury gem and I would think it would make more financial sense to renovate its interior rather than raze the 200m+ skyscraper piece by piece.
 

·
i ♥ NY
Joined
·
4,892 Posts
I have very mixed feelings about this new JP HQ. On one hand I was constantly adressing to replace some of those "ugly boxes" but now that this might come true, I feel like a portion of NYs identity might get lost, since these kind of towers are virtually a part of the NY vibe. I wouldnt mind to loose 666 5th e.g. but some of these black Seagram like boxes surely have their aesthatics, IMO. So I guess a nalance between preserving and redevelopjng is important.

Hopefully this midtown east rezoning will lead to a lot of LPC protection for the older buildings there, and force and put pressure for developers to go insanely tall. Imagine Park Avenue redeveloped into a huge vibrant stretch of up to 15 supertalls, with the infrastructure renovated, new businesses and retail added.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
No word on how tall and no renders. What can be done with 2.5m sf?
The articles all say they're looking at something in the ballpark of 500 ft. above the roof of the current tower, so around 1200 ft.

I'm hoping that the tower portion will remain and will be incorporated into the new HQ while the much shorter portion of the building fronting Madison Avenue, which has a large footprint itself, will be demolished for the new tower. 270 Park is a midcentury gem and I would think it would make more financial sense to renovate its interior rather than raze the 200m+ skyscraper piece by piece.
I love that idea. Basically you'd make an adjacent, 1200 ft. second tower, attached to the tower on Park (maybe in the same style or a 21st update of International), and the original would basically be a 700 ft. setback. Something more or less like this:


JPMC Addition Visualization by Marshall Knight, on Flickr

The issue is though, I'm pretty sure the 2.5M square feet must include the original building. I think, even with the new zoning (and even though JPMC has already sunk quite a bit of money into a LEED Platinum refurbishment) the only way to get the new top of the line office space built would be to demolish the whole thing. Hope I'm wrong though!
 

·
City Development Shitlord
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
I would wait for an actual rendering before making an opinion.

Still, it looks like JPMorgan Chase gave up on moving Downtown, 5WTC or even 2WTC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
What is that pyramidal building behind Bloomberg tower on CityRealty's render? I've missed that announcement
That would be 145 E. 60th, the site of the former Subway Inn on the upper east side. The most recent render is a design by Archillier...



...but there were a couple others in consideration and it's unclear whether that's the design the developers have chosen (or whether this project is still alive, since there was some turnover in the development partnership).
 

·
pooh bear
Joined
·
6,639 Posts
Ehh the existing skyscraper is nice but there's hundreds of other towers exactly like it. Obviously the new design has to be a major upgrade (including to the streetscape) for me to support it.
 

·
whitest boy in the delta
Joined
·
12,707 Posts
will this be the tallest skyscraper demolished for reasons other than structural damage?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zaz965
1 - 20 of 678 Posts
Top