SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 125 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,918 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Did you know that New York City has a functioning gondola system, called the Roosevelt Island Tramway?

Source

And did you know that NYC is planning for a light rail network that will rival its neighbor to the west, called the Brooklyn-Queens Connector?

Source

New York City is once again transforming itself from a city that runs on 24/7 buses and subways to one that is becoming more and more multi-modal in nature, investing in transportation technologies that will further improve connectivity in its five boroughs.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,150 Posts

·
Grid or Riot
Joined
·
195 Posts
RIT is nothing else but a tourist attraction, but if you're looking for a getaway from the crowded streets of Manhattan I'd suggest taking a walk across the Roosevelt Island and then taking the F train to Forest Hills in Queens. [/OT] The proposed light rail line comes as a surprise though, a few years back DOT planned a pilot line from Red Hook, but they eventually pulled out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
And did you know that NYC is planning for a light rail network that will rival its neighbor to the west, called the Brooklyn-Queens Connector?

Source
While I find this surprising and interesting to hear about, I think building a light rail in their current situation would be a huge waste of money for the MTA (and every authority involved).
To improve Brooklyn/Queens service efficiently they should rather look into a second crosstown subway line running further east that roughly parallels the (G).
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,150 Posts
While I find this surprising and interesting to hear about, I think building a light rail in their current situation would be a huge waste of money for the MTA (and every authority involved).
To improve Brooklyn/Queens service efficiently they should rather look into a second crosstown subway line running further east that roughly parallels the (G).
While the G train does service this corridor , the LRT will service several massive redevelopment sites that are 10-15min walk from the nearest subway station. And provide a relief outlet for the G train down the road , along with the over strained F , N/Q , R trains.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,918 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Glancing through the proposed Brooklyn-Queens Connector map, I've noticed something: the line proposal roughly follows the current routings of bus lines B61, B62, and B63, among others, most of which run 24/7. Perhaps that line will relieve congestion on all three lines at least, if not provide additional capacity for the entire corridor using light rail. Correct me if I'm wrong or if I miss additional bus lines that could be impacted by that upcoming line because I remember reading a lot of bus maps and schedules from the NYCMTA, in which I take note of the communities served by each line... As for the LIRR connection at Atlantic Terminal, will it be run as an independent line, or will it be paired up with services coming from either 3rd Avenue or Astoria?
 

·
Leicester:NY:London
Joined
·
493 Posts
New York Mayor to Propose Streetcar Line
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUMFEB. 3, 2016
Source: The New York Times

In a major reimagining of the New York City waterfront, Mayor Bill de Blasio is set to propose a streetcar line that would snake along the East River in Brooklyn and Queens, a 16-mile scenic ride that would be his administration’s most ambitious urban engineering project to date.

The plan, to be unveiled on Thursday in the mayor’s State of the City speech, calls for a line that runs aboveground on rails embedded in public roadways and flows alongside automobile traffic — a sleeker and nimbler version of San Francisco’s trolleys.

By winding along the East River, the streetcars would vastly expand transportation access to a bustling stretch of the city that has undergone rapid development — from the industrial centers of Sunset Park, Brooklyn, to the upper reaches of Astoria, Queens — but remains relatively isolated from the subway....
Read More here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,116 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,794 Posts
New York Mayor to Propose Streetcar Line
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUMFEB. 3, 2016
Source: The New York Times



Read More here
Wait... $2.5 billion for a 16-mile (25.75 km) light-rail line? :nuts: That's $156 million per mile or $ 97 million per km. Why is it so expensive?

Also, if the renders are anything to go by, it's not even separated from car traffic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Wait... $2.5 billion for a 16-mile (25.75 km) light-rail line? :nuts: That's $156 million per mile or $ 97 million per km. Why is it so expensive?
because NYC isn't empty Baltica!

Such a scheme in the UK would cost a similar amount based on rough comparisons with recent on-street tram construction costs in the UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,794 Posts
^^ I was actually thinking about a proposed light-rail line in Helsinki which will cost € 275 million for 25 km (€ 430-440 million with vehicles and depot). A fully underground 14 km metro line in Helsinki will cost around € 1 billion (or € 72 million per km).

IIRC light rail lines in France have a cost of € 20-30 million per km.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,116 Posts
Wait... $2.5 billion for a 16-mile (25.75 km) light-rail line? :nuts: That's $156 million per mile or $ 97 million per km. Why is it so expensive?

Also, if the renders are anything to go by, it's not even separated from car traffic.
Because New York real estate is extremely expensive. 8th in the World rankings by city. and on top of that construction cost especially workers salaries are astronomical.

It cost $900 USD a square foot to build in NYC.

http://therealdeal.com/issues_articles/nycs-construction-craze/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
^^ I was actually thinking about a proposed light-rail line in Helsinki which will cost € 275 million for 25 km (€ 430-440 million with vehicles and depot). A fully underground 14 km metro line in Helsinki will cost around € 1 billion (or € 72 million per km).

IIRC light rail lines in France have a cost of € 20-30 million per km.
Helsinki resides on Fennoscandia shield that is mostly solid granite and right on the surface. Why Helsinki has so much of its infrastructure in open underground tunnels as it's cost effective even with Helsinki's low density.

New tram lines being build example in London is obviously way more expensive than here. Even here all the new tram lines being built at the moment are centered on downtown expansions, rather than retrofitting it to existing downtown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,779 Posts
What?...apparently you are uninformed.
It was stating my opinion.


@bd_poppeye, lot prices have nothing to do with this since it would mostly be built on the streets, which are city property.

@sotonsi, that can't be true. Construction costs for public transit in the USA are considerably higher than elsewhere in the world.
 

·
Gotham City
Joined
·
10,972 Posts
Bill de Blasio Wants to Build Streetcars For the Brooklyn-Queens Waterfront's Wealthy Gentrifiers

Brendan O'Connor
Yesterday 9:12pm

In his State of the City speech on Thursday—attendance at which his administration is working very diligently to limit to friendly faces only—Mayor Bill de Blasio will unveil, among other things, his proposal to build a streetcar line along the East River, connecting Sunset Park, Brooklyn, with Astoria, Queens.
The proposed system (which would not open until 2024) would cost the city about $2.5 billion to build, the New York Times reports—significantly less than a new subway line. “There is a desperate need for north-south transportation between Brooklyn and Queens,” Mitchell L. Moss, director of the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy at NYU, said. “This is going to do more to encourage more housing than any other transit improvement currently underway.”
This is a ridiculous thing to say: developers do not need any more encouragement to renovate and build on Brooklyn and Queens waterfronts, which are already home to some of the most expensive real estate in the outer boroughs. Speaking of which! From the Times:
Mr. de Blasio’s plan has support from major developers, including Jed Walentas of Two Trees Management, whose residential conversion of the Domino Sugar refinery on the Williamsburg waterfront is set to open soon. Mr. Walentas, who has both clashed and collaborated with the mayor, has championed the streetcar plan, helping to pay for a study on its feasibility and cost.
Actually, Two Trees owns more than a dozen residential and commercial properties on the Brooklyn waterfront. The Times hints that de Blasio will tout this plan as beneficial for the (not insubstantial, especially in Queens) number of people living in NYCHA housing along the proposed line, but nobody was talking about how badly these folks need infrastructural support before one of the most influential developers in the state got involved.
...
 

·
Gotham City
Joined
·
10,972 Posts
Mayor de Blasio to Propose Streetcar Line Linking Brooklyn and Queens

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUMFEB. 3, 2016



A rendering of the proposed streetcar line, the Brooklyn Queens Connector, in Downtown Brooklyn. Credit Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector

In a major reimagining of the New York City waterfront, Mayor Bill de Blasio is set to propose a streetcar line that would snake along the East River in Brooklyn and Queens, a 16-mile scenic ride that would be his administration’s most ambitious urban engineering project to date.
The plan, to be unveiled on Thursday in the mayor’s State of the City speech, calls for a line that runs aboveground on rails embedded in public roadways and flows alongside automobile traffic — a sleeker and nimbler version of San Francisco’s trolleys.
By winding along the East River, the streetcars would vastly expand transportation access to a bustling stretch of the city that has undergone rapid development — from the industrial centers of Sunset Park, Brooklyn, to the upper reaches of Astoria, Queens — but remains relatively isolated from the subway.


For Mr. de Blasio, a Democrat focused on social reform, the plan also represents a shift to the kind of ambitious Robert Moses-style planning that New Yorkers more often associate with his predecessor, former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, who made transportation a hallmark of his tenure.



A rendering of the streetcar in Brooklyn. The system is expected to cost the city about $2.5 billion, significantly less than a new underground subway line. Credit Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector The streetcar system, which would realize a long-held fantasy of the city’s urban planners, is expected to cost about $2.5 billion, significantly less than a new underground subway line, city officials said on Wednesday.
Its operation, however, remains far-off. Under the plan, construction would start in 2019, after studies and community review; service would begin several years after that, perhaps not until 2024, officials said.
Alicia Glen, the deputy mayor for housing and economic development, acknowledged “some significant engineering challenges when you are putting a modern system like this in a very old city.”
...
 
1 - 20 of 125 Posts
Top