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La Sagesse private school forced to shut down
by Paul James, The Journal, March 27th 2008


ONE of the North East’s leading private schools will close this summer after the group of nuns who founded it tripled the rent, The Journal can reveal. The decision to shut the La Sagesse school in Jesmond, Newcastle will leave 200 pupils looking for new schools and 54 members of staff out of work. The £3,000-a-term school has been based on the site since 1912, six years after it was founded by a Catholic order named the Sisters of La Sagesse, or the Daughters of Wisdom.

The past two years have seen the sisters leave Newcastle and what the school described as their “formal business arrangement” has seen the nuns ask for treble the rent. At the same time the school’s pupil numbers have halved since the nearby Royal Grammar School opened its doors to girls in 2002. Last night the future of the Victorian Gothic mansion and its 10-acre site overlooking Jesmond Dene was not clear. Staff said they were concentrating on supporting pupils and staff until it closes on August 31.

The closure will affect the school’s 180 girls and 20 boys, their 30 teachers and 14 support staff.

Last night Prof Kathleen McCourt, chair of governors said: “It is with great sadness and regret that we have had to make the decision to close La Sagesse. Over the last 18 months the relationship we have with our founding order, The Daughters of Wisdom, has become that of a formal business arrangement. Following the departure of the sisters from Jesmond the order have recently confirmed that our rent will more than treble and that coupled with the competition for independent school places in Newcastle, makes it impossible for us to keep the school open.”

La Sagesse was founded at Low Fell, Gateshead, in 1906. It moved to its present site in 1912, which includes Jesmond Towers, the former home of shipbuilder Charles Mitchell. Former pupils include actress Denise Welch. Last night Prof McCourt added: “We acknowledge the closure will come as a huge shock to those involved with the school and our concern now is the wellbeing and support of pupils and staff through this difficult time.

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited by Moderator)
New city school to be build on Hunters Moor Hospital site
Dec 2 2009 by Tom Mullen, The Journal


A VICTORIAN hospital is to be demolished to make way for a new school on the edge of Newcastle city centre. The disused buildings of Hunters Moor Hospital, which have been empty since 2007, will come down to make way for a school for children from nursery age to year six.

The governors of Dame Allan’s Schools have exchanged contracts, subject to planning consent, to buy the six-acre site and buildings from Newcastle Primary Care Trust (PCT).

The buildings in Spital Tongues are not listed and the school’s plan is to bring their junior school and nursery together on one site, close to the main schools in Fenham.

Dame Allan’s nursery and early years are currently at Forest Hall, while years four to six are in Fenham.

Chairman of governors Elliott Ward said the wooded area is large enough to develop a junior school designed to take full advantage of the latest technology with many environmentally-sustainable features, while still having ample space for formal and informal play areas.

“This is one of the most significant decisions taken by the governors since the move to Fenham in the 1930s,” Mr Ward said. “As a former pupil, parent and current grandparent of pupils at the school, I am proud we have taken this bold step.

“Dame Allan’s has thrived for more than 300 years and this move will help to secure the future of the schools for the coming years.”

Hunters Moor, a former neurorehabilitation hospital, was decommissioned in May 2006 because of the opening of a hospital in Walkergate, Newcastle. The last patients left its wards in 2007.

Nick Sherwood, property and planning manager for Newcastle PCT, said: “We are pleased to have exchanged contracts, subject to planning consent, to sell the site and buildings at the former Hunters Moor Hospital site to Dame Allan’s Schools.

“Money from this sale will be invested in improvements to local health services.

“In selling the building it has been important to make sure that we got best value from the sale of the property for the public purse.

“We have also been keen to work with planners from Newcastle City Council and Your Homes Newcastle to make sure that the final use of the building is appropriate and in keeping with the community.”
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hmm, i really hope dame allan's reconsider wholesale demolition, surely this would look good as a centrepiece:

 

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Discussion Starter #4
that is supposedly the business centre overlooking the mouth of the ouseburn. not sure how true the tale is re the emperor, though high level japanese diplomatic missions visited Newcastle on numerous occasions - the bafuku and iwakura missions for instance. However these came before the Ouseburn School opened in 1893. It is more likely it was built like this for Japanese busissmen/govt officials who made frequent trips to tyneside for trade and shipbuilding purposes, not to mention japanese sailors who were often stationed in newcastle to wait for their ships to be completed at our shipyards.



here's some info on the Iwakura Mission:

The Iwakura Mission arrived in London in August 1872 and split into smaller groups to visit Liverpool, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Newcastle upon Tyne.

In Newcastle upon Tyne they arrived on October 21 staying in the Royal Station Hotel where they met the industrialist Sir William Armstrong. It had been ten years since the Bakufu mission had visited the town.

"The gentlemen were attired in ordinary morning costume and except for their complexion and the oriental cast of their features, they could scarcely be distinguished from their English companions." (Newcastle Daily Chronicle, October 23, 1872)

They visited the Elswick Engine and Ordnance Works with Captain Andrew Noble and George Rendell, inspected the hydraulic engines and the boring and turning departments and examined the construction of Armstrong and Gatling guns. They also visited the Gosforth Colliery, descending into the mine itself. Further visits were made to Bolkcow and Vaughan Iron Works in Middlesbrough and iron-ore mines in Cleveland. The Newcastle and Gateshead Chamber of Commerce arranged a river trip on the Tyne, taking in the New Tyne Bridge, the Tharsis Sulphur and Copper Company Hebburn and the Jarrow Chemical Works.
 

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New plans unveiled for green-friendly
School Building on Hunters Moor site

Apr 3 2010 by Amy Hunt, The Journal



Dame Allan’s school in Fenham, Newcastle has unveiled plans for a new junior school built from recyclable materials and set in six acres of mature woodland. The woods will become an outdoor classroom for the children. A nature trail will wind around the old trees and timber left to rot will encourage ants and wildlife to make their home there. The school’s principal Dr John Hind said: “The site is a wonderful learning opportunity in itself. The teachers and pupils will be able to explore the grounds, seeing the natural world at first hand and watching the seasons unfold.”

Hunter’s Moor hospital, which has stood on the site on Hunter’s Road since 1884, will be demolished and the bricks crushed to build the school’s foundations. The eco-building will be so energy efficient there will be no need for central heating. Instead underground pumps will take heat from below the Earth’s surface and send it up to the building.

Architect Ian Belsham said: “New and exciting materials and technology will be used.” Solar panels will heat water for the children and rain collectors on the roof will gather water to flush the toilets. The school, for three to 11 year-olds, will have no air conditioning. It will take in hot air in the summer and cool it with hi-tech ventilation. Computers will monitor the building’s temperature and carbon dioxide levels and adjust the ventilation. The main corridor of the school will also be fitted with solar powered extractor fans to increase ventilation on hot days.

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Discussion Starter #6
got to say i think this looks really bland and would rather the existing building is recycled, with at least the main facade kept. using the old bricks by crushing them for foundations is a bit insulting.

 

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I agree that it's a real shame that the existing building is going - I think that it's a great example of its period.

The only problem is, I doubt it could be successfully converted into a modern school. However surely there are other sites for the school, with this building converted to housing etc?

I'm guessing however that this is the biggest capital receipt that the city can get. It is a shame though.

And sorry to be pedantic, but isn't using heat from a GSHP still a form of central heating if it's delivered underfloor, via radiators or as part of a hot air system? It's just not gas/oil central heating. I could be wrong though.

I also agree that the school's pretty bland looking, but most are these days. At least there's no brightly coloured render, which I just find insulting (in a "brite colorz = fun!!1!!1!" way).
 

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johnnypd; 27th March 2008; Full Summary of Projects Thread said:
some shock news regarding La Sagesse, it's closing down after the nuns who own the site tripled the rent!

La Sagesse private school forced to shut down
Mar 27 2008 by Paul James, The Journal


La Sagesse private school in Jesmond:



ONE of the North East’s leading private schools will close this summer after the group of nuns who founded it tripled the rent, The Journal can reveal.

The decision to shut the La Sagesse school in Jesmond, Newcastle will leave 200 pupils looking for new schools and 54 members of staff out of work.

The £3,000-a-term school has been based on the site since 1912, six years after it was founded by a Catholic order named the Sisters of La Sagesse, or the Daughters of Wisdom.

But the past two years have seen the sisters leave Newcastle and what the school described as their “formal business arrangement” has seen the nuns ask for treble the rent.

At the same time the school’s pupil numbers have halved since the nearby Royal Grammar School opened its doors to girls in 2002.

Last night the future of the Victorian Gothic mansion and its 10-acre site overlooking Jesmond Dene was not clear. Staff said they were concentrating on supporting pupils and staff until it closes on August 31.

The closure will affect the school’s 180 girls and 20 boys, their 30 teachers and 14 support staff.

Last night Prof Kathleen McCourt, chair of governors said: “It is with great sadness and regret that we have had to make the decision to close La Sagesse.

“Over the last 18 months the relationship we have with our founding order, The Daughters of Wisdom, has become that of a formal business arrangement.

“Following the departure of the sisters from Jesmond the order have recently confirmed that our rent will more than treble and that coupled with the competition for independent school places in Newcastle, makes it impossible for us to keep the school open.”

La Sagesse was founded at Low Fell, Gateshead, in 1906. It moved to its present site in 1912, which includes Jesmond Towers, the former home of shipbuilder Charles Mitchell. Former pupils include actress Denise Welch.

Last night Prof McCourt added: “We acknowledge the closure will come as a huge shock to those involved with the school and our concern now is the wellbeing and support of pupils and staff through this difficult time.

“We took the decision to announce the closure early so that our staff have more time to seek alternative employment. The school has a record of high academic achievement and outstanding pastoral care which we are confident makes our staff highly employable. We will be working with parents to identify an alternative independent school which provides the best fit for their children.”

Wonder what will happen to the site. if it is redeveloped the old buildings have to be retained, and i'd hope for high density housing. if the nuns want to retain ownership and keep redevelopment minimal then maybe looking for a business school with a desire for a UK base would be beneficial to the town.

Later, Freddie Shepherd bought the site (I don't think we have a Project Thread for it, as far as I am aware?) and this is a bit of news from todays Chronicle . . .


La Sagesse is raided three times in one week
Apr 22 2010 by Adam Jupp, Evening Chronicle



SCRAP metal thieves have targeted an historic Tyneside school three times in a week.

The raiders first swiped more than five tonnes of lead from the roof of La Sagesse, in Jesmond, Newcastle.

They then returned on two separate occasions to plunder the former private girls’ school for copper piping and other parts.

Police have launched an investigation into the thefts, as security was stepped up at the Grade II listed site.

The former Gothic mansion was bought by ex-Toon owner Freddy Shepherd in a £5m deal in February last year.

He said: “It is very disappointing anyone would target a building like this, not once but three times.

“We have brought in extra security measures in an attempt to prevent this happening again.”

THE REST OF THE ARTICLE IS HERE - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-east-news/todays-evening-chronicle/2010/04/22/la-sagesse-is-raided-three-times-in-one-week-72703-26295428/
 

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I didn't know that about La Sagesse - great to see those nuns, holy as they are, are happy to put income above the education of children. To be honest, the fact that they tripled the rent in one fell swoop does suggest that it was a thinly veiled attempt to shut the school and sell the site off. Maybe Freddy was in contact a few years earlier.
 

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School plans move to old hospital site
May 27 2010 by Tony Henderson, The Journal


PLANS by one of Newcastle’s oldest schools to take over a Victorian hospital site are set to be given the go-ahead.

Planners are advising Newcastle city councillors on June 4 to back the scheme by Dame Allan’s Schools to develop the six-acre former Hunters Moor Hospital site in Spital Tongues.

The hospital – built in 1893 and closed three years ago – would be replaced by a 300-pupil junior school for Dame Allan’s and a 20-pupil nursery, with associated external learning and play areas, grass and sports facilities, staff and visitor parking and drop-off areas.

At present, the junior school is split between sites at Forest Hall and the main Dame Allan’s School in Fenham.

The development would also increase capacity at the schools, which currently have almost 1,000 pupils and free up space for development at Fenham, in areas like art and technology.

A feature of the new building would be a red, egg-shaped pod above the entrance, which will be an external extension of the school library.

Dame Allan’s principal Dr John Hind said: “This will represent our vision of the library being at the heart of the school.” Environmental considerations have also played a significant part in the design of the new school.

The Town Moor and Hunters Moor adjoin the site to the west. Dr Hind said: “The large, mature, wooded site is a wonderful learning opportunity in itself.


FULL ARTICLE HERE - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-east-news/todays-news/2010/05/27/school-plans-move-to-old-hospital-site-61634-26530741/
 

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At committee today, Hunters Moor Hospital approved.

Above, now in today's (7th June 2010) Journal . . .


It’s the green light for a green school
Jun 7 2010 by Amy Hunt, The Journal



PRIMARY pupils will have a new school after plans were given the go-ahead.

The new Dame Allan’s junior school will be built on the site of the Victorian Hunter’s Moor Hospital site in Spital Tongues, Newcastle.

Due to open in September 2012, the school, for 300 pupils, has been designed with a host of green features, including renewable energy and rainwater recycling.

The derelict hospital, which was built in 1893 and closed three years ago, will now be demolished, with leftover rubble used as part of the school’s construction.



Trees on the site will be left in place to create an outdoor woodland classroom for the children. A nature trail will wind around trees and timber will be left to rot to attract wildlife.

Inside the building there will be ground source heat pumps for heating, solar panels for hot water and recycling of rainwater to flush toilets.


ARTICLE HERE - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-east-news/todays-news/2010/06/07/it-s-the-green-light-for-a-green-school-61634-26600930/


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The "Reference Book" that this Historic Newcastle Thread has become, periodically needs 'topping up' with items (that in years to come we would expect to 'find' (if looking for them) on this thread) that have already been posted on other threads on the Newcastle Forum . . .

The Arthurs Hill area of West Newcastle, and the
old school there called Westgate Hill School


Newcastle Historian; May 31st 2010 said:
Background, to the origin of the name 'Arthurs Hill' . . .

and a few photos (etc) from the Arthurs Hill area of West Newcastle . . .


From the book Bygone Elswick, by A D Walton.


As part of my research, I found a lovely little book that I knew I had, but hadn't read for ages . . .


Compiled (also) by A D Walton, along with "The Stanhope Street Area Action Centre", in 1979.

Some photos (examples) from the 'A Century of Arthurs Hill' book . .




ALSO from the same book, an interesting 'illustration', drawn in September 1891 . .



I was lucky enough to attend Arthurs Hill Junior School (sometimes called 'Westgate Hill' School) for a couple of enjoyable years, when I lived in nearby Crown Street. Sadly, Crown Street was demolished shortly after we left, but its identical continuation street (Kingsley Terrace) is still there today.

I enjoyed my time in Elswick/Arthurs Hill, I can well remember the MASSIVE bonfire I helped build in our back lane one year (we had got loads of stuff to burn from areas of nearby Scotswood that were being demolished) and it was so big, we nearly set fire to the houses. At the time, I thought it was GREAT (aged 9).

Interestingly, shortly after we moved to Elswick, there was a big article in the Evening Chronicle, entitled "The slum schools of Newcastle". It used Arthurs Hill School as its main example, and stated that it would be demolished within two years.

Well, its still there in 2010!

Newcastle Historian; June 2nd 2010 said:
Judging by this newspaper article from 1899, about its opening when newly built, it appears to have always been a school.

When I used to attend that school, I remember there was also a physically 'totally identical' school along Westmorland Road somewhere. I don't think that one is there now (?)

Hope you can read this! . . .

 

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I remember Isaac Waltons though I don't recall ever being in the shop. My school uniform (St. Cuthbert's Grammar School) could only be bought from Raymond Barnes in Grey Street.

I can remember being in Raymond Barnes as a young-un, with my mother, getting my FIRST school uniform.

I remember being on a 'raised area' at the back of the fairly long/narrow shop.

I remember that raised bit at the back, purely because years later (in the mid-1980s) me and Mrs H used to sit in that area in the new 'Fitzgeralds Wine bar', which that shop had then become!!

Fitzy's, shortly after that, also took over the premises next door (down Grey St) to become the much larger 'Fitzgeralds Pub'.

Mind, I remember also getting school stuff (of some sort) from a shop called the North of England School Furnishing (which later became the 'North of England Book & Staionery Company') on Grainger Street, towards the station on the other side from Isaac Walton.

It was located in the premises that (in this recently taken Google Earth Photo) are up for sale/to let . . (think it became an 'Antique Centre' after the School Furnishings closed in the 1980s?)

 

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I remember the North of England School Furnishing Company where all my school requirements were purchased. When I left school I worked for Gateshead Council in the education department and discovered that the company had a contract to supply all Gateshead schools with everything from pencils to desks and cupboards. The company's head office was in Darlington. I also remember the building when it was an antique centre and I think it might have been called "The Peoples Museum & Antique Centre". The museum bit prompted me to take my grandchildren on a visit. The basement was split in to tiny little shops which looked like they belonged in a Dickens novel. It was a strange mixture of antiques and junk but it was claustrophobic and smelled of damp. I don't think we repeated the experience.
 

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a public school is one which is open to the paying public and historically is a boarding school-it has solely been funded by fees or donations and is usually a registered charity.none of the schools above are regarded as public schools and are termed independent ie they are not now in council control (neither are academies like emmanuel), are day schools rather than boarding and are accesible by examination only-fees are now paid but there has been a contribution in the past from the state for capable pupils without the finance.they were previously grammar schools subject to open competition for a place. none of the schools in the ne with the exception of durham and barnard castle are regarded as public schools. sacred heart is a non fee paying catholic school previosly a catholic only grammar school.
 

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Almost 'hidden away' at the bottom of the below article (from todays Journal, and shown on the 'Historic' thread) is the penultimate paragraph, relevant to this thread, and sounding the death knell of HUNTERS MOOR HOSPITAL . . .

History of Dame Allan schools commemorated
November 2nd 2010, by Tony Henderson, The Journal

JUST over 300 years ago, tobacconist’s widow Eleanor Allan fulfilled her pipe dream of opening schools for poor children, and yesterday her statue looked down on the unveiling of a plaque which marked the schools’ long links with Newcastle.

The first schools are believed to have been sited near St Nicholas Church, now the city’s Anglican Cathedral, with moved in 1786 to Manor Chare near All Saints, 1821 to Carliol Square, 1861 to Rosemary Lane off Pudding Chare, and 1875 to Hanover Square before moving in to the purpose-built College Street building. It is now owned by Northumbria University and part is let to the Newcastle Law Society and part to the city council’s youth offending team.

Today, the schools are based in Fenham and have a total of 920 pupils, and Coun Hindmarsh said: “Dame Allan’s Schools have played a significant role in the life of our city’s education and I am delighted their connections to the city centre are being marked at this plaque unveiling.”

Today, demolition begins on the 1893 Hunters Moor Hospital in Spital Tongues, Newcastle, with the six-acre site being redeveloped as a 300-pupil junior school for Dame Allan’s and a 20-pupil nursery, due to open next September.

At present, the junior school is split between sites at Forest Hall and the main Dame Allan’s School in Fenham.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-east-news/todays-news/2010/11/02/history-of-dame-allan-schools-commemorated-61634-27582545/#ixzz147AuULwx
 

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One of the many buildings lost to the East Central Motorway was the John Dobson-designed Clergy Jubilee School. Its claim to fame was that in later years it housed the legendary Downbeat Club.

It was situated just down from what is now For Your Eyes Only, opposite the GPO building. Or more accurately, beneath the southbound fast-lane of the motorway.

There are a handful of pictures of the interior of the club but I've never seen any of its exterior apart from the drawing, above. Does anyone have any photos of the building? I'm not expecting any of it as a club, but I'd still be curious to see what the building that housed it looked like. If it's any help, there was a glazing company on the ground floor for many years (unfortunately I don't know its name).

Many thanks.
 

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One of the many buildings lost to the Central Motorway East was the John Dobson-designed Clergy Jubilee School. Its claim to fame was that in later years it housed the legendary Downbeat Club.

It was situated just down from what is now For Your Eyes Only, opposite the GPO building. Or more accurately, beneath the southbound fast-lane of the motorway.

There are a handful of pictures of the interior of the club but I've never seen any of its exterior apart from the drawing, above. Does anyone have any photos of the building? I'm not expecting any of it as a club, but I'd still be curious to see what the building that housed it looked like. If it's any help, there was a glazing company on the ground floor for many years (unfortunately I don't know its name).

Many thanks.

Its address was 'Carliol Square' . . .



I'm sure there will be some photos of the exterior, somewhere. I'm going to look through the "Diversion" thread, which has a lot of Central Motorway East photos on it!
 
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