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Inner city roads are the responsibility of local governments areas. For example in benin city alot of the major roads are owned by the state government and alot of the major roads have been fixed by the state. But all of the smaller inner roads are owned by the local governments and they dont do anything!!!!

Nigeria has 774 local government area and not one....I REPEAT NOT ONE...is performing well. many of them, as I stated on Nairaland, have 90%+ recurrent expenditures, in other words they only exist to pay salaries.

In terms of Oil Allocations: 48.5% for Federal Government, 24% for the state governments, 20% for local government, and 7.5% for Special fund. Thats 20% of oil money just going to pay salaries and incompetence.

In my opinion we should just get rid of the 20% LGA allocation and give it to the states. once Nigeria reaches a certain level of development then we can have LGAs again.

Everyone is talking about federal government and getting the presidency when 774 corrupt useless local seats are drying up the nations coffers. Get rid of LGAs or atleast reduce them to only 3 per state
Shouldn’t get rid of local governments but give them avenues to make money. Are they able to tax effectively? What controls do they have to attract business to their local government and so forth. Without the power to actually perform how else will they succeed
 

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That is because LGAs were never designed to be functional in Nigeria.

They are tools for the State government machinery.

In the West LGAs have real power and real function, so much so that an LGA can even rival a state government! We need LGAs in Nigeria, and they need to become independent from the state governments.
 

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That is because LGAs were never designed to be functional in Nigeria.

They are tools for the State government machinery.

In the West LGAs have real power and real function, so much so that an LGA can even rival a state government! We need LGAs in Nigeria, and they need to become independent from the state governments.
The same is said about state governments. And people say we should get rid of state governments.

From what I recall LGA are set by the federal government and can’t be changed by state governments. In fact it would be more efficient if states can decide how many LGAs would work for it
 

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Not disputing any of that.

Just saying that whatever number of LGAs there are, they should be independent from the State government, and they should be involved with the majority of city planning.

A lot of what we discuss on this forum, should actually be the domain of the LGAs, that is how powerful they are supposed to be. As it is right now, I have heard that the LGAs kick back to the State government.

I think the State governments are actually over-stepping their boundaries in that regard, they are involved in too much city-planning...They need to lose some of their power to the LGAs.
 

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Old article. Interesting to look back
ARCHIVES | 1976

Nigeria's'Indigenization’ Policy Under Fire

By JOHN DARNTONOCT. 30, 1976
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This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.

Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. Please send reports of such problems to [email protected].

The article as it originally appeared.
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October 30, 1976, Page 32Buy Reprints
The New York Times Archives
LAGOS, Nigeria, Oct. 29—In an effort to wrest control of the economy from foreign hands, Nigeria has embarked upon a stepped‐up policy of forcing foreign‐owned companies to sell into Nigerian ownership.

The policy, called “indigenization” or “Nigerianization,” has sent up loud outcry from international businessmen who assert that it will discourage the flow of investment capital to what is the biggest, and most profitable, marketplace in black Africa.

One major bank, Citibank, has already decided to pull out rather than accede to the Government demands. is in the process of liquidating a loan and lease portfolio amounting to $60 million.

Other foreign banks have decided to remain, at least temporarily, by selling a required 60 percent of their equity shares to the central bank of Nigeria at the beginning of this month, the deadline set by the Government for the banks to act.

The Federal Military Government, for its part, has gone to great lengths to assuage the fears of foreign investors. It is not nationalizing the businesses, it points out, but merely increasing the proportion of ownership by Nigerians in order to become master in its own house. A handsome profit can still be made, it says, by those who follow the rules.

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“In embarking on indigenization, the Government has been influenced by the need to place control of the Nigerian economy squarely in the hands of Nigerians and to ensure that Nigerians are the main beneficiaries of the resources of their country,” said Lieut. Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo, then head of state, in a broadcast on June 29.

Trend Toward Africanization

Throughout much of black Africa, there is a trend toward “Africanizing” the management or ownership of key industries, but nowhere is it as pronounced as in Nigeria, an economic giant whose gross national product is equal to all the rest of black Africa combined.

As spelled out in a white paper issued by the Government in July and soon to be legislated in a military decree, the indigenization is a radical extension of an effort started in 1972 under the more westward‐looking regime of Gen. Yakuba Gowon.

That effort largely failed, according to a report by an industrial enterprises board set up last November by the more nationalistic military regime that ousted General Gowon in July. The mandate of the board was to examine the progress of indigenization.

The original indigenization decree set down two categories of foreign businesses for Nigerian participation. One category, reserved exclusively for Nigerians, contained 22 types of enterprises, ranging from assembling radios to hairdressing, candle‐making, bread‐baking and tire‐retreading. The second category contained 33 businesses and they were to be 40 percent Nigerian owned. Among them were department stores, real estate agencys, shipping and numerous manufacturing industries. Many businesses, especially those requiring foreign expertise, were not included in either category.

According to the board's report, 950 businesses fell under the decree, and only one third of them had fully complied by June 1975, more than one year after the deadline date. The companies evaded the decree with applications for naturalization, exemptions granted on ‐flimsy grounds” and, most of all, the technique known as “fronting,” whereby Nigerians “front” for foreign owners.

White Paper Provisions

Under the provisions of the white paper, the categories for Nigerian ownership are broader and the amount of ownership greater. There are now three categories. The first, 100 percent Nigerian owned, ranges from cosmetics manufacture to film distribution and covers a wide scope of businesses. The second, to be 60 percent Nigerian owned, includes banking, insurance, mining, fertilizer production, pulp and paper mills, planation agriculture, cement manufacture, construction industries and large‐scale department stores and supermarkets. Any foreign enterprise not in these two categories falls autornaticallly into the third, which calls for 40 percent Nigerian ownership.

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The businesses have until December 1978 to meet the deadline. in drawing up the white paper, the Government softened somewhat the recommendations of the board.

The banks, however, did not get off so lightly and were the sole exception to the two‐year deadline. They had until Oct. 1 to achieve 60 percent indigenous equity participation—a date that was set, General Obasanjo said in his broadcast, because of the “critical nature of banking institutions to the success of the indigenization effort and indeed the health of the Nigerian economy.”

Some see other factors at work, however. The banks have long been a target here, mostly because their lending practices, geared toward short‐term profit, have not coincided with the Government's plans for long — term development projects. Many of the banks, especially the American ones, were licensed as merchant banks but instead operated as commerical banks where there is less risk and faster money to be made. They have been criticized by the Government for this.

The largest banks here, Barclays International and Standard and Chartered, agreed to increase Nigerian equity—already over the level of 40 percent —to 60 percent. By contrast, the American banks were 100 percent foreign owned.

Chase Manhattan sold 60 percent of its equity shares at 1.24 naira, or almost $2 a share. Under the arrangement the Federal Military Government will control three of the five seats on its board, including the chairmanship. The bank will continue to operate under its own name.

First National Bank of Chicago also sold 60 percent to the central bank but won the right to function under a new name. The. Bank of America, the only one of the three that is not a merchant bank hete, held to the same agreement.

Since the purpose of indigenization is to spread the wealth among the people, some bankers assume that the central bank, which purchased the shares to meet the looming deadline, will eventually resell them to the general public. in this case the foreign investors, retaining a solid block of 40 percent, would have a certain amount of control. But other bankers feat that the Government intends to hold on to the shares, as additional leverage to ensure that loans go to productive sectors of the economy that need money but are not attractive to lenders, such as agriculture.

In capitulat'ng to the Government's demands,The foreign banks were clearly motivated by the temptation to maintain a presence here, however minimal. They are looking to the day a year or so front now when Nigeria, whose imports ate skyrocketing and whose capital needs go up with each new development project, will go into the overseas money market. They want to be in on the ground floor.

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/10/30/archives/nigerias-indigenization-policy-under-fire.html
 

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It's really sad, the potential for Nigeria is astronomic but I don't believe their has ever been A modern large country be mismanaged to this level. I feel for my nigerian brothers and sisters, you guys are so talented and do so much with very little to no government support. I hope you can overcome the obstacles and emerge as a stronger country. But I'm afraid that won't be the case until Buhari and his dogs step down.
 

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It's really sad, the potential for Nigeria is astronomic but I don't believe their has ever been A modern large country be mismanaged to this level. I feel for my nigerian brothers and sisters, you guys are so talented and do so much with very little to no government support. I hope you can overcome the obstacles and emerge as a stronger country. But I'm afraid that won't be the case until Buhari and his dogs step down.
I am surprised that Naijaswag is one of those who liked this post, as he was one of the people clamoring for the Daura butcher to be elected in 2015
 

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NIMC says that 57.3 million Nigerians have done NIN registration



The National Identity Management Commission (NIMC) has said that only 57.3 million Nigerians have so far done their National Identity Management (NIN) registration out of 200 million population in the country.
The update is coming as the June 30 deadline by the Federal Government for mobile phone users to link their NIN with their Subscribers Identity Module (SIM).
According to NAN, this disclosure was made by the Director-General of NIMC, Mr Aliyu Aziz, at a workshop to co-create a Roadmap for a digital registration system as part of the Civil Registration and Vital Statistics System (CRVS) in Nigeria in Abuja on Monday.
Aziz said that a strong national identity system was vital to building a viable economy and nation and called for intensive birth registrations by all in the country aimed at providing legal identity for all by 2030 in accordance with Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).

He said, “Birth registration will engender financial inclusion and improvement of welfare. Foundational identity is very important for National Planning.’’

The NIMC boss, who reiterated the imperatives of birth registrations, affirmed the determination of the commission to collaborate with the National Population Commission (NPC) in the actualisation of the legal identification agenda.
Dr Yemi Kale, the Statistician-General, National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), who was represented by Mr Abolade Sunarjudeen, praised the National Population Commission (NPC) for its effort in transiting the country from manual to digital birth registrations.

While noting that a partnership with the population commission was key to reliable population data, Kale called for increased awareness and sensitisation on the importance of birth registration in the country

 

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EFCC Recovers N5.4bn For NHIS






The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), has recovered N5.4billion for the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS).



Executive Secretary of NHIS, Prof. Muhammad Nasir *****, made the disclosure on Thursday when he led the management of the agency on a courtesy visit to the headquarters of the EFCC in Jabi, Abuja.

“In total, the EFCC has been able to recover about N5.4billion for us out of the N12.085b that has been trapped; this is a monumental achievement and that is why we will ensure that we remain good partners to the EFCC,” he said.

Prof ***** commended the EFCC for the recoveries and assured that every kobo recovered will be judiciously utilized.

He also used the opportunity to update the EFCC on the reform efforts at the NHIS, which include the recruitment of health professionals to enhance the capacity of the Scheme to respond to the yearning of subscribers and other stakeholders in the sector.

Responding, the executive chairman of the Commission, Abdulrasheed Bawa, who was represented by the Director of Operations, Abdulkarim Chukkol, reiterated the agency’s resolve to work with the NHIS in achieving universal health coverage.



“The EFCC has no choice but to work with you, to make you succeed. We will always see to it that the investigation that we are doing, we will continue with it; we are happy that it is yielding result and all the monies or funds that are recovered are being put to good use. So we will not relent in our efforts to see that each and every kobo that is lost is recovered for the benefit of the country,” he said.

 
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