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LOL Logybogy :) , MIAballinboi :) , Street :) . Build them all, tear down any nimby neighbor :bash: who complains, lol. Street :) you also forgot ICE 2, and the Paramount Bay , and Platinum Bay, all 50 floor plus towers in the same area, Go Cranes !!! :cheers:
Is this Boom ever going to end. I say not in the next 5 years !, interest rates are still nice at www.interest.com :)
 

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One thing I agree with the article about is that Onyx2 should do something with that north wall. In the renderrings its just a featureless, window-less 50-story tall 100-foot wide slab of concrete. Or maybe its a window which would be cool, but the article seems to confirm my fear that its just concrete.
 

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Here is a good article in the Herald that all Nimby's should read and be thankful that they live in a city exploding with growth rather than decaying into a collection of crackhouses.

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/columnists/fred_grimm/11298057.htm

Growth isn't a panacea, but dying's worse

BY FRED GRIMM

[email protected]


The steel mill and the paint factory closed. The grand department store that had anchored the downtown business district for 75 years strung chains through the door handles.

Storefronts along the city center were either vacant or occupied by marginal enterprises that allowed the property to rot around them. The old drug store sold discounted clothing in cardboard bins. A one-time upscale clothing store offered cigarettes and groceries with an emphasis on single beer sales.

City leaders didn't go meekly. They begged for new industry. They talked up the city with an incessant, desperate optimism. They would have given up a son or daughter, or at least a niece or nephew, for one of the high-rise projects that have fomented such controversy hereabouts.

Maybe my years in a faltering Ohio River industrial town has tempered apprehensions about the astounding burst of urban redevelopment sweeping through South Florida. Other rotting towns of my past reinforce what anti-growth activists must see as a glaring character defect. My worries about the changing skylines of downtown Fort Lauderdale, Miami and Hollywood butt up against memories of dying places.

A DELTA DAWNING

I landed my first newspaper job at a little daily newspaper in the Mississippi Delta at a time when it was becoming apparent that technology, with machines that could do the work of 40 farmhands, made farm towns nearly obsolete. You could see it every June after high school graduation. Black kids got on the bus and headed for Chicago. White kids went to Memphis or to the Gulf Coast to catch work on the oil derricks.

A stint running a weekly newspaper in the West Virginia coalfields was another lesson in economic malaise. My friends and I would drive 40 miles over mountain roads for the luxury of a fast-food burger joint.

The worry, in these other places, wasn't what was coming. But what was going. We didn't argue about new construction changing the character of the community. We wondered if the old movie house would close or whether the only decent restaurant in town could muddle through another lousy year.

And I admit to a kind of gape-mouthed peckerwood amazement at the transformation now gripping South Florida. I see new construction in Miami neighborhoods where a quarter century ago, I was chased by rioters or where I covered murders as routine as traffic accidents. And in Fort Lauderdale, where a blood bank was a mainstay of the old downtown.

My long-standing joke about Hollywood has been that for 25 years it has been on the verge of a renaissance. The joke is fast losing its punch line.

`THEY'RE COMING

Controversy erupted earlier this month when Fort Lauderdale requested permission from the county to allow another 13,000 residential units in its downtown core. The county commission, indignant at such an outrageous request, knocked the number down to 3,000.

Of course, as City Commissioner Dean Tratalis noted, they're coming, no matter what. The question is whether we stack our new residents up in downtown condos or send them and the new construction into adjoining neighborhoods.

They're coming. Tratalis hopes they'll be close enough, once situated downtown, to leave their cars in the condo parking garage and walk to work, to bars, to shops, to restaurants. His critics charge that so many new condos will overwhelm the city's infrastructure and smother the neighboring communities.

Meanwhile, real estate analyst Michael Y. Cannon (managing director of Integra Building Resources, South Florida) worries that speculators have so distorted the market, no one quite knows how many real condo residents are coming to South Florida. But the urgent problem of so many luxury condo towers just doesn't seem all that urgent. Not to me. Not to someone who remembers too many vacant storefronts down empty main streets in dying towns.
 
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