SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
North Texas at center of college football universe
08:38 PM CDT on Sunday, June 21, 2009

By GARY JACOBSON / The Dallas Morning News
[email protected]

With the new Cowboys Stadium in Arlington and efforts to attract more big games to Fair Park, the Dallas-Fort Worth area is making a run at becoming the nation's capital of college football, both financially and on the field.

The five games in Arlington this coming season, including the Big 12 Conference championship game and the AT&T Cotton Bowl, should generate more than $50 million in ticket, food, beverage, merchandise, parking and sponsorship revenue for the participating teams and the Cowboys, according to an analysis by The Dallas Morning News.

That's on par with annual revenue at football powers like Penn State and Louisiana State, according to Department of Education statistics.

Add four games at Fair Park in Dallas, the Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl in Fort Worth and the area's three Bowl Subdivision teams – TCU, SMU and North Texas – and college football probably will account for well over $100 million in revenue here this season.

That's roughly 40 percent to 50 percent more than for the top individual revenue-producing programs – Texas, Georgia, Florida and Ohio State.

And last week, Dallas officials said they were actively working to bring a new bowl game to Fair Park, as early as the 2010-11 bowl season.

"This market is just outstanding," said Dan Beebe, commissioner of the Big 12.

Area fans have an opportunity to see many storied teams this fall, all within an hour's drive or so.

Six teams that finished in the top 25 in the final Associated Press poll last season play regular-season games here, beginning with Oklahoma (No. 5) and Brigham Young (No. 25) at Cowboys Stadium on Sept. 5. Cowboys officials expect the game to be sold out.

OU returns Oct. 17 for its annual game against Texas (No. 4) at Fair Park. TCU (No. 7) has six home games, including Utah (No. 2) on Nov. 14. Texas Tech (No. 12) plays Baylor at Cowboys Stadium on Nov. 28.

In addition, Texas A&M meets Arkansas at Cowboys Stadium Oct. 3, the same day Grambling plays Prairie View at Fair Park.

Navy plays at SMU Oct. 17; Army plays at North Texas in Denton Nov. 21, and Texas Southern plays Arkansas Pine Bluff at Fair Park on Nov. 28.

More top-ranked teams will compete in Arlington in the Big 12 championship and AT&T Cotton Bowl.

"The new stadium is a game-changer for us," said Rick Baker, president of the Cotton Bowl Athletic Association, which moved its annual game from Fair Park to Cowboys Stadium. Baker's goal is for the Cotton Bowl eventually to be a national championship game.

New venue a cash cow
The new stadium is also a game-changer for team finances.

A&M and Arkansas each expect to earn at least $4 million from their game. Because of the weak economy, that's down from an initial estimate of $5 million apiece, but still better than their home games. In typical home-and-home schedule arrangements, the home team keeps the revenue, meaning one big payday every other year. Now, the payday can come every year.

"We net about $3.5 million for a home game," said A&M athletic director Bill Byrne. The Aggies have sold 4,000 of their allotted 7,000 club seats, priced at $300 apiece, Byrne said. That, alone, totals $1.2 million.

The schools' agreement with Cowboys Stadium runs for 10 years and can be extended to 30 years. "We wanted a regular presence in the metroplex," Byrne said, adding that nearly a quarter of A&M alumni live in the area.

Games at the new stadium also should be revenue bonanzas for other teams.

"We believe that it will be our best attended home game of the season and our biggest revenue-generating game," said Baylor AD Ian McCaw, who called Cowboys Stadium "a spectacular college football venue." He expects other Big 12 schools and possibly SEC teams to seek to play games there in the future.

The Baylor-Tech game moves to the Cotton Bowl at Fair Park in 2010.

More to come
Cowboys vice president Stephen Jones, son of owner Jerry Jones, has said he would like to schedule 10 college games a season in the team's new stadium. Notre Dame will play Arizona State, from the Pacific 10 Conference, there in 2013.

"They'll get a great response from schools wanting to play in that fabulous stadium," said Dave Brown, an ESPN vice president who helped arrange the OU-BYU game. He called Dallas and Atlanta "two of the best" areas in the country for college football and said he wouldn't be surprised to see more Pac-10 teams playing here.

ESPN is also a partner in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game in the Georgia Dome in Atlanta on Sept. 5, featuring Alabama against Virginia Tech.

Tom Starr, former director of the Armed Services Bowl in Fort Worth, said if another site for BCS championship games is ever added, it would come down to the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta and the AT&T Cotton Bowl at Cowboys Stadium.

Starr, who left the ESPN-owned game last month to start his own consulting business, is working with Dallas officials to bring a new bowl and more regular-season games to the renovated Cotton Bowl Stadium, which can seat 92,000 for football.

"There is room for more good college games in the area," Starr said.

The ESPN deal with Cowboys Stadium, aiming for a marquee game at the beginning of the each season, runs for five years.

OU's Texas windfall
OU receives $2.25 million for its game, according to its contract, obtained through an open records request. Counting their split (about $4.5 million) from the Red River Shootout with Texas, that means the Sooners will earn $6.75 million for games in the Dallas area this year. And they could return again in December for the Big 12 championship.

OU and BYU already have sold out their ticket allotments (37,500 for OU and 10,000 for BYU), school officials said. Prices ranged up to $150.

"If we had more tickets, we'd sell them," said BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe.

The remainder will go on sale later this summer, said Cowboys spokesman Brett Daniels.

Holmoe said it would be tough for two college opponents without national status or strong area ties – Washington and Pittsburgh, for example – to draw well in Dallas for regular-season games. That's why he was attracted to Oklahoma.

A private institution, BYU is not subject to open records laws, and Holmoe wouldn't reveal BYU's specific monetary guarantee for the game. Asked if it were in the ballpark of $1.5 million, he acknowledged that it was. "It's about the size of one of our home games," he said.

Solid foundation
The state of Texas has long been a football stronghold. It has more high school football players than any other state and is prime recruiting territory for colleges across the country. Ten Bowl Subdivision programs are in Texas, more than any other state. Ohio is second with eight. Two major conferences, the Big 12 and Conference USA, are based in Irving.

In addition, many major football corporate sponsors are based in the Dallas area: AT&T, Frito Lay, Dr Pepper. Recently, Advocare, the Carrollton-based dietary supplement company, became the name sponsor of the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La.

And while coaches June Jones and Todd Dodge try to resurrect the on-field fortunes of SMU and North Texas, TCU keeps getting better – and its schedule stronger – under Gary Patterson. The Horned Frogs have non-conference home games against Texas Tech in 2011; Oklahoma, Virginia and Navy in 2012; LSU in 2014; and Arkansas in 2016.

There has been no talk of moving the annual TCU-SMU game to Cowboys Stadium, according to officials at both schools.

Big 12 Conference and Cotton Bowl association officials are being conservative with their attendance projections for their games at the new stadium, holding close to the base capacity of around 70,000. With standing room and temporary seating, the stadium can hold more than 80,000.

But even if attendance for the Big 12 championship game doesn't break the record of 80,031, set in 2006 at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, the game could set a revenue record because of all the premium seats, Beebe said. Ticket prices will be set later this year.

In its deal with the stadium, Beebe said, the Big 12 gets the ticket revenue, and the stadium gets parking, food, beverage and some merchandise sales.

The Cotton Bowl association, which has priced club seats at $250 each, has a similar deal, Baker said. Assuming a sellout and including sponsorship money – AT&T contributed $1.9 million in the fiscal year ending April 2008, according to the association's public financial records – he estimates the association would gross about $10.5 million, about the same amount as with the record crowd of 88,175 for the last Cotton Bowl at Fair Park.

"The new stadium is creating a whole new opportunity," Baker said.

BIG GAMES COMING TO D-FW THIS SEASON
At Cowboys Stadium, Arlington

Sept. 5 – Oklahoma vs. BYU

Oct. 3 – Texas A&M vs. Arkansas

Nov. 28 – Texas Tech vs. Baylor

Dec. 5 – Big 12 Conference championship

Jan. 2, 2010 – AT&T Cotton Bowl

At Cotton Bowl Stadium, Fair Park

Sept. 12 – Texas A&M-Commerce vs. Abilene Christian

Oct. 3 – Grambling State vs. Prairie View A&M

Oct. 17 – Texas vs. Oklahoma

Nov. 28 – Texas Southern vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Some others

Oct. 17 – Navy at SMU

Nov. 14 – Utah at TCU

Nov. 21 – Army at North Texas
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Orange Bowl is not played in the Orange Bowl and so on and so on. I think the only Bowl game in its name stadium is the Rose Bowl.
 

·
Love me, love my dog...
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
The Independence Bowl is played at Independence Stadium...the Liberty Bowl is played at the Liberty Bowl...the Sun Bowl is played at the Sun Bowl...but you're right, most of the stadiums have either been renamed with a sponsor name or replaced over the years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
Ganis, you're taking away from my point. The Cotton Bowl WAS played at THE Cotton Bowl in Dallas same place every year since 1937. Few bowls can match the history of that. Now the Cotton Bowl is being moved to an alternate location that is more glamorous while there is nothing at all wrong with the Cotton Bowl, in fact, City of Dallas is going to renovate it. To me, that's wrong. That's $$$ taking over and replacing things that matter, like history, and meaning.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the Cotton Bowl wants to be the 5th BCS Game (it should be, The Cotton Bowl used to determine the Championship at one point) Then they needed to be in a stadium where the in game temperature can be controlled like the Super Bowl. The Current BCS system of one location hosting 2 games each year (regular BCS game and Championship) is not working to well. A 5th Stadium is needed.
 

·
Love me, love my dog...
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
Ganis, you're taking away from my point. The Cotton Bowl WAS played at THE Cotton Bowl in Dallas same place every year since 1937. Few bowls can match the history of that. Now the Cotton Bowl is being moved to an alternate location that is more glamorous while there is nothing at all wrong with the Cotton Bowl, in fact, City of Dallas is going to renovate it. To me, that's wrong. That's $$$ taking over and replacing things that matter, like history, and meaning.
There are others bowls with a similar history that can "match that". The Orange Bowl was played at the Miami Orange Bowl from 1938-1996; the Rose Bowl has been played at the Pasadena Rose Bowl since 1922; the Gator Bowl was played at the Jacksonville Gator Bowl from 1946-1993...to name a few. It's not "wrong" to move the location of a football game to a better stadium - in fact, it's very common to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
The Rose Bowl, to me, is the only bowl that matches the history of the Cotton Bowl, and obviously it will never move. The Cotton Bowl shouldn't, either.

I agree with Ganis in that the bowl needs an upgrade in order to return to the top of college football, since somehow when the BCS was formed everyone decided unanimously that Dallas was too cold (which is the first time anyone has ever said that). I just think that instead of building a $1 billion mega-stadium out in bumfuck Arlington (least favorite place in the world) they could have spent that money on the Cotton Bowl and you'd still have the nicest stadium in the country and it would also be the same Cotton Bowl people have grown to love over the last century.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
You could have spent all that on the Cotton Bowl but we still would not have a shot at a BCS game because THEIR IS NO ROOF! Dallas sucks in January.

Dallas had its chance to build the stadium. Blame Former Mayor Laura Miller (she hates all public funded projects like the successful American Airlines Center) and some Judge who would not allow it to be put on the Dallas election ballot because she feared it would bring out more republican voters (mid term elections) and she would not be re-elected (she wasn't)

Soooo... Jerry Jones went to Dallas first. The 2 sites were...
1. Cotton Bowl Site
2. Reunion Arena Site

.....2 Elected officials said no and the Dallas City Council was furious. By the time the Dallas City council tried to get it on a ballot, Arlington had already said yes and the citizens approved it.

Dallas Updated the Cotton Bowl to keep UT v OU because it has the bigger draw.
 

·
Love me, love my dog...
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
The Rose Bowl, to me, is the only bowl that matches the history of the Cotton Bowl, and obviously it will never move. The Cotton Bowl shouldn't, either.

I agree with Ganis in that the bowl needs an upgrade in order to return to the top of college football, since somehow when the BCS was formed everyone decided unanimously that Dallas was too cold (which is the first time anyone has ever said that). I just think that instead of building a $1 billion mega-stadium out in bumfuck Arlington (least favorite place in the world) they could have spent that money on the Cotton Bowl and you'd still have the nicest stadium in the country and it would also be the same Cotton Bowl people have grown to love over the last century.

If a brand-new state of the art stadium were built that offered the Rose Bowl a new home that was 100% better - I guarantee you it would move. No contest. It's about money and profit, not sentimentality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Miami and New Orleans also host big college football games. These sites host a BCS Bowl and have the BCS national championship game rotating through every four years. Both of these games are bigger than any of the games in Dallas. I think Dallas could jump into this rotation with the new stadium but no way with that old cotton bowl stadium. Dallas metro is adding several college games this year which is great.

2007 was a great year for college football in New Orleans b/c they hosted the BCS sugar bowl and BCS national championship (the biggest game in college football.)

2007:

Sugar Bowl had a 175 million economic impact on New Orleans

BCS National Championship had a 250 million impact on New Orleans.

Heck, the Bayou Classic (African American schools game b/t Grambling and Southern) had a 175 million economic impact on New Orleans.

New Orleans Bowl only had a 15 million impact, lol.

Throw in sell out games Tulane vs LSU in the Superdome and 2007 was a great year for college football in New Orleans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
The Rose Bowl, to me, is the only bowl that matches the history of the Cotton Bowl, and obviously it will never move. The Cotton Bowl shouldn't, either.

I agree with Ganis in that the bowl needs an upgrade in order to return to the top of college football, since somehow when the BCS was formed everyone decided unanimously that Dallas was too cold (which is the first time anyone has ever said that). I just think that instead of building a $1 billion mega-stadium out in bumfuck Arlington (least favorite place in the world) they could have spent that money on the Cotton Bowl and you'd still have the nicest stadium in the country and it would also be the same Cotton Bowl people have grown to love over the last century.
actually, the rose bowl has not been held in the Rose Bowl every year. It was actually played at Duke University during WW2 due to the fear of Jap invasion. An interesting tid bit for you there :).

But yes, it is a shame.....corporate greed and sponsors have taken away the tradition of the game. The peach bowl is no longer in existance, the cotton bowl (which as someone pointed out earlier used to be HUGE)....these have been replaced with papajohns.com bowls where virtually any team with a winning record went to a bowl. Bowl games used to be a real treat for a team. Not every team in the top 25 would get a bowl invite.

I think it's actually a great comparison to society in general today. Too many people feel they "deserve" a big house, money, fancy car. Beacuse as children, they were given "participation" trophys and medals when they were on the losing team in tee ball. We have bred a generation of losers....and people that are comfortable with not trying to better themselves. They have never worked hard in their lives because everything has been given to them. They expect that the government should be providing for them.....geeze, going on a long rant here.....but this is exactly what is wrong with society today. GREED and ENTITLEMENT
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Im glad AT&T didnt wanna call it the AT&T Bowl and just calls it the AT&T Cotton Bowl because they (like a few others) understand that these Bowl names are larger then their corporate ID.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
I think the city of Dallas should do everything it can to keep the Cotton Bowl relevant and functional for the future.

There is alot of history in that building, and it should not be left to decay like another great stadium (Legion Field) that a city (Birmingham, AL) shamefully abandoned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
Yea OU v. UT is of course huge for Dallas, but it will need more to keep that stadium relevent. Maybe they can vie for the 5A championship and state marching band stuff. It is still a blow that the Cotton Bowl is leaving the Cotton Bowl. And I disagree with Weimie...for us true football fans, sentimentiality is far more important than the $$$ behind the game.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top