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Vålerenga's new stadium

For many years Vålerenga have played without a home stadium of their owb, and in the latest years they have shared Ullevaal Stadion (national stadium of Norway) with city rivals Lyn. They've had a dream of their own stadium and in 2008 Oslo municipality said that they can build it in an area donated by the Oslo municipality.

The supposed name for the stadium will be "VIF Kultur- og Idrettspark", meaning "the culture and sports park of Vålerenga IF".

Renders (Published on 28 November 2008):







 

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Moss FK (in Norway's second highest league), from a city of 40,300 people, currently play at Melløs, with a capacity of 10,000 but with ca. 1,000-2,000 people at each match.

Here are Moss FK's plans:

















The building of the stadion is expected to start in a few months, and they hope it to be ready in March-April 2010, in time for the start of the 2010 season in Noreay. It will have a capacity of 10,000. Moss FK have said that if they promote this season and the stadium will be ready in 2010, they can get an average attendance of about 4,000.
 

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Hønefoss BK (a city with 30,000 inhabitants, Oslo suburb) currently play at a shitty stadium called Hønefoss Idrettspark (Hønefoss Sports Park) in Norway's second highest league. It has a capacity of 4000, but the record is 3773 people:



In November 2007 they started building the new stadium in Schongslunden in Hønefoss. It will have a capacity of 5,000 people, and it will be ready for the start of Norway's football season in March 2009:



Seats will be installed in the whole stadium.
 

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I think it´s a great arena that fills the purpose. Ideally the roof should have been higher but I don´t think Oslo aspires to host any major football matches in that arena. It also can be used for indoor athletics, ice hockey and so on.
The stadium will be used for every home match of Stabæk IF, Norway's current champions. So there'll be plenty of important matches there.

I don't think it'll be used for athletics much, and ice hockey is a very small sport in Norway (3-4,000 poeple in attendance at most), so I don't think it'll be used for that either.

AFootball and concerts will be the only major events in the stadium.
 

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Here are the current (2009 season, starting in March) stadiums of Norway's top league, Tippeligaen:

Name: Color Line stadion - Capacity: 12,000 - Team: Aalesund :bow:



Name: Alfheim stadion - Capacity: 7,500 - Team: Tromsø



Name: Aspmyra stadion - Capacity: 6,100 - Team: Bodø/Glimt



Name: Brann stadion - Capacity: 17,967 - Team: Brann



Name: Fredrikstad stadion - Capacity: 12,800 - Team: Fredrikstad



Name: Komplett.no Arena - Capacity: 9,000 - Team: Sandefjord



Name: Lerkendal stadion - Capacity: 21,000 - Team: Rosenborg



Name: Marienlyst stadion - Capacity: 8,500 - Team: Strømsgodset

http://www.toppfotball.no/aimages
/Marienlyst_stadion_1208954537_485x323.jpg

Name: Skagerak Arena - Capacity: 13,500 - Team: Odd Grenland



Name: Sør Arena - Capacity: 14,300 - Team: Start



Name: Telenor Arena - Capacity: 15,000 - Team: Stabæk



Name: Ullevaal stadion - Capacity: 25,572 - Teams: Vålerenga and Lyn



Name: Viking stadion - Capacity: 16,600 - Team: Viking



Name: Åråsen stadion - Capacity: 12,500 - Team: Lillestrøm



Name: Aker stadion - Capacity: 11,000 - Team: Molde :bash:

 

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About the ball hitting the ceiling, scientists claim that this will happen only 1-2 times per season.
"American scientists claim..."
I've heard these words quite often, and not always in a credible context. Yehovas Witnesses told me the world would die until latestly 2000 (proposed in the mid-nienties), I heard about "studies" that there would be no evidence for climate change or any danger in smoking.
So ,"scientists" will claim whatever you want them to claim.

Don't understand this as an offense, please, but I have my doubts about this because the fact that the ceiling is very low is just too obvious. Please take into account that in the Frankfurt Commerzbank Arena, the video cupe has been hit several times by now, at least once even during a world cup match.

picture by www.stadionwelt.de

edit: Feel free to compare the heights yourself:
 

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Don't understand this as an offense, please, but I have my doubts about this because the fact that the ceiling is very low is just too obvious. Please take into account that in the Frankfurt Commerzbank Arena, the video cupe has been hit several times by now, at least once even during a world cup match.
I completely agree, the roof seems way too low. I find it a bit strange that Norway's FA allow football of high level to be played in a stadium with a low roof like this.
 

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Besides this, I must say that I'm deeply impressed with the evolution of Norwegian grounds. Marvellous!
Yes, in the last 2-3 years there has been a huge stadium boom in Norway:

Some examples:

Aalesunds FK, from this:



To this:



Fredrikstad FK, from this:



To this:



IK Start, from this:



To this:



etc.
 

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Although the stadiums in the top division aree quite nice, stadiums in the second highest league are much worse:

Finnmarkshallen stadion:



Gjemselund stadion:



SIF stadion:



Hopefully soon the stadium boom will reach these small clubs as well.
 

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Tromsdalen UIL (Norway's second highest league) have built a new main stand with 1200 seats, mostly covered. Cost: 37,5 million NOK (ca. 3,9 million EUR, 5,4 million USD, 3,7 million GBP).



With the building of this stand they also rename the stadium from Tromsdalen kunstgres ("the artificial grass football pitch of Tromsdalen") to TUIL Arena. The rebuilding is done in time for the 2009 season (March 2009).
 

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I see several clubs have chosen artificial surfaces. Is this a new trend in Norway? Is it that difficult to grow grass?
 

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I see several clubs have chosen artificial surfaces. Is this a new trend in Norway? Is it that difficult to grow grass?
The Norwegian football season usually lasts from March/April to October/November. In the first and the last round of the season it can get very cold so the grass gets a bit destroyed. Therefore artificial grass is needed. My club, Aalesunds FK, was the first in Norway to install artificial grass, in 2005.
 

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Norwegian Tippeliga

For those of you wanting to check out the recent Norwegian "stadium boom" in further detail, I've collected a few links.

With regard to the population of a mere 4,7 million, the standard of the top flight stadiums is quite remarkable.

On the negative side: In a fair share of even the more recent developments, supporting pillars are used for roof structures - as some of you will notice.

Her are the 15 stadiums of the 16-club-strong top league of the 2009 season, listed alphabetically:

Aalesund
Bodø/Glimt
Brann (Bergen)
Fredrikstad
Lillestrøm

Lyn and Vålerenga (Oslo)
Molde
Odd Grenland (Skien)
Rosenborg (Trondheim)
Sandefjord
Stabæk
Start (Kristiansand)
Strømsgodset (Drammen)
Tromsø
Viking (Stavanger)

Out of these 15, only Viking stadium and Lerkendal (Rosenborg) are among the proposed venues (after expansions) for the joint Euro 2016 bid with Sweden. Other venues (should the Scandi bid be picked) will be built from scratch.
 

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Nice collection !

There are some fine stadiums in Norway ! My favourites are Aalesund (fantastic 3 tier main stand) , Brann (English style) , Molde (nice architecture), Start, Oslo and Stavanger.

I absolutely dislike the Rosenborg stadium mainly because of the 'Japanese' roof design. Horrible.
 

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I think the main stand at Aalesund looks silly the way as its way too small to have so many levels, but that just my opinion. The rest of the stadium doesnt look very good either, with the wall between the tiers. Molde has a very nice looking stadium. Lerkendal looks kinda silly, but on the other hand I like it as its different from anything else I have ever seen. Viking is just a boring bowl.

My favorite here in Norway is Fredrikstad. Terracing for the home fans, four individual stand, barrel shaped roof on both sides. The only downside are a few supporting pillars and the ugliest VIP stand I have ever seen.

Im quite pleased with our stadium here in Bergen, but we need a new south stand. Its old, built in several stages, has seats with restricted views and is quite far from the pitch. It can be seen in the first picture on this page http://www.stadionsiden.com/stadiums_details.asp?stadium_id=67&method=showphotos . When they will build the new stand is unknown due to the financial situation. On the other hand, Im very pleased with how they built the VIP stands. Instead of splitting the stand in half with VIP seats in the middle, they built the VIP seats at the back. This really helps the atmosphere.
 
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