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Happy now...
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Seems like a remarkably small building and compound for $360 million, and what's with the wavy pattern on the outside walls, some kind of stealth technology perhaps?

How a sheep paddock was turned into a $360m nerve centre for our troops - Sun Herald


Brigadier Wayne Buddis overseeing the development of Australia's new military operations command centre.
Photo: Andrew Meares

April 6, 2008

Australia's new top-security military command centre is being built behind rings of steel and razor wire. It will be used for Australian military forces deployed across the world, writes Frank Walker.

AT ITS core deep within the new $360 million defence force Headquarters Joint Operations Command bunker is an 18.6-metre-wide screen that will show live images, graphics and maps of Australian military movements around the globe.

It looks like the high-tech control room depicted in the TV spy thriller series 24 and dozens of Hollywood movies where generals and admirals watch battles unfold live, call in air strikes and move men and machines against the enemy.

In front of the giant screen - the largest of its type in Australia - four rows of desks line up before an elevated platform where defence chiefs can direct troops, ships and war planes in combat on the other side of the world.

Giving The Sun-Herald the exclusive first tour of Australia's highest security defence facility, under construction just outside Canberra, project head army Brigadier Wayne Budd said the screen was dubbed the "knowledge wall".

"It is made up of 52 separate cubes and can show one giant image or can be broken into dozens of separate images," he said. "It could display an air battle with multiple tracks showing different aircraft types, where they are headed and who they belong to.

"That information helps commanders make their decisions to manoeuvre our own forces.

"For the first time we will have navy, army and air force all in the one place to make joint command decisions. Until now they have been in separate locations and have to talk to each other by phone."

From the inner core, defence chiefs will be able to watch live footage of a military operation, in Timor or Afghanistan, from a camera mounted on a helicopter hovering overhead.

A camera on a navy ship could beam the action as it unfolds, while sailors intercept a suspicious vessel in the Persian Gulf or off the coast of Australia.

A Royal Australian Air Force jet fighter or unmanned flying drone could send live vision of enemy positions enabling commanders at the headquarters to redirect ground forces.

Headquarters Joint Operations Command near Bungendore, 30 kilometres east of Canberra's defence offices, will bring together six command centres now spread across separate centres at Potts Point, Garden Island, Paddington, Glenbrook, Melbourne and Canberra.

The building and wiring in the 218-hectare complex are almost completed. By November, defence personnel start moving in. It should be fully operational by early next year.

The new headquarters will operate around the clock and accommodate 720 military personnel. The nerve centre will be off-limits to all but those with the highest security clearance.

No photographs are allowed inside the building. Access is gained only through ever tightening security checkpoints, swiping a smart card and going through handprint and other biometric controls.

Brigadier Budd, an engineer, used experience gained from overseeing the building of the Coalition Joint Command Centre in Baghdad in 2003 to make the Australian command centre secure.

"The biggest danger is from vehicles or persons moving from one zone to another. We created zones with ever increasing security, not allowing vehicles to move into the inner zone. [In Baghdad] we used clean vehicles, which stay inside the zone so we know they have not been tampered with. We have done the same here."

The two-storey almost windowless concrete bunker-like building is 100 metres inside an octagon-shaped four-metre-high security fence topped by razor wire, designed to stop a heavy truck trying to smash its way through.

Why octagon? "The Yanks only have a Pentagon, so we are several steps ahead," Brigadier Budd laughed.

No vehicles are allowed through the inner security gate to stop car bombs from reaching the bunker.

Staff have a canteen, gymnasium and indoor basketball court in the outer zone.

"This is probably the most secure location in Australia," Brigadier Budd said. "It was a sheep paddock when we started."

Photo Gallery
Oblique aerial view


Close up


Entrance


Lockers I wonder what the colours mean?


Huge fence


Entrance and fence


Fenceline




Windowless building walls


Empty cafeteria
 

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selling my body since 88'
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Cool. But it begs the question that our most vulnerable point is the satellite. At the moment it should be fine but hopefully in future we build defences for satellites.

In theory it's great, but i think a general should always be at the battlefield.

Seems like a remarkably small building and compound for $360 million, and what's with the wavy pattern on the outside walls, some kind of stealth technology perhaps?
lol. Stealth wouldn't be much use for something that doesn't move.
 

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Cool. But it begs the question that our most vulnerable point is the satellite. At the moment it should be fine but hopefully in future we build defences for satellites.

In theory it's great, but i think a general should always be at the battlefield.



lol. Stealth wouldn't be much use for something that doesn't move.
Lets hope they used their brains and put the nerve centre underground.
 

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Happy now...
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Discussion Starter #5
Official Website for this baby at http://www.defence.gov.au/id/hqjoc/

Some more pics/renders and details from the site




Note everything west of the road next to the site including the forested areas is part of the ACT.












Some FAQ from the site
What is Headquarters Joint Operations Command?
Headquarters Joint Operations Command (HQJOC) is the operational military headquarters of the Vice Chief of the Defence Force (VCDF) in the role of Chief of Joint Operations (CJOPS). HQJOC is spread between Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne. Strategic staff are in Canberra, joint component and intelligence staff are in Sydney, and some logistics staff from Headquarters Joint Logistics Command are in Melbourne.

HQJOC is responsible for the planning and conduct of operations and other activities such as disaster relief within Australia and the region and assistance with the restoration of law and order in the Solomon Islands and East Timor, and participation in large-scale allied military operations such as Afghanistan, and Iraq.

How much will it cost?
The total capital cost estimate for the HQJOC Project is approximately $300 million. The cost includes the buildings and infrastructure; the command, control, communications, computing and intelligence systems; land acquisition; workplace relocation costs, and design, professional fees and construction contingency; but excludes goods and services tax.

When will the new HQJOC be completed?
The new HQJOC facility will be ready for occupation by the end of 2008.

How many people will be employed at the facility?
The headquarters facility is being designed to accommodate around 750 military and civilian Defence staff, with the flexibility to augment staff depending on the level of operational activity. They will perform work currently undertaken at the various headquarters and agencies that make up HQJOC in Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne.

What are the plans for housing and resettlement of military staff?
The Defence Housing Authority will build or acquire up to 500 new family homes/townhouses/units to provide housing for Australian Defence Force staff assigned to Canberra, including to the new Headquarters Joint Operations Command facility. On 28 October 2004, the Defence Housing Authority and the ACT Land Development Agency jointly announced the sale of 350 serviced blocks in the ACT (Gungahlin area) to the Defence Housing Authority over the next three years. The Defence Housing Authority has advised that the balance of the homes will be sourced from the general Canberra and Queanbeyan real estate market.

Has the Government ever used private financing on a scale as big as this before?
This will be the first project where Government has sought to privately finance the construction and maintenance of a major facility on a greenfield site.

Public Transport
The issue of public transport between Canberra, Queanbeyan and the new HQJOC site is being investigated in preparation for the site's occupation. Similarly, the increased volume of traffic on the Kings Highway is also being investigated by the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) and Roads ACT. Discussions have commenced, and are ongoing, with the various authorities responsible for the maintenance and improvements to the Kings Highway.
 

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Cool. But it begs the question that our most vulnerable point is the satellite. At the moment it should be fine but hopefully in future we build defences for satellites.
We cannot have weapons in outer-space or use satellites for weaponisation. It is banned under PAROS Treaty or Prevention of Arms Race in Outer Space. However, it is legal to militarise satellites since most developed countries use satellites for intelligence purposes along with commercial services.
 

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selling my body since 88'
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We cannot have weapons in outer-space or use satellites for weaponisation. It is banned under PAROS Treaty or Prevention of Arms Race in Outer Space. However, it is legal to militarise satellites since most developed countries use satellites for intelligence purposes along with commercial services.
Wow didn't know that. Arming Sats though looks to be the key. Thanks for the info.

But having said all that, i'm sure they could just hack into the system and shut the whole damn thing down.:lol:
 

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En travesti
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We cannot have weapons in outer-space or use satellites for weaponisation. It is banned under PAROS Treaty or Prevention of Arms Race in Outer Space. However, it is legal to militarise satellites since most developed countries use satellites for intelligence purposes along with commercial services.
Grow up man. Satellites are one of the most important links in our military chain. Satellites are used for communication, reconnaissance and precision targeting for bombs and missiles. Since satellites can easily be shot down with intercontinental missiles it's also one of our weaker links should we go to war with a missile owning nation.

By the way, if we're building this new do-it-all centre, will this free up some of the best real-estate property on the continent for commercial development (Paddington and Potts Point) ?
 

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It's our very own Octagon!
^^ My thoughts exactly

Grow up man. Satellites are one of the most important links in our military chain. Satellites are used for communication, reconnaissance and precision targeting for bombs and missiles. Since satellites can easily be shot down with intercontinental missiles it's also one of our weaker links should we go to war with a missile owning nation.
He's only repeating the gist of the treaty. And it would be a violation of the treaty to put an active weapons system in orbit. But, if the United States' laser research in the 1980s produced a viable satellite-based ballistic missle defence system, you can bet it'd be up there treaty or not.

By the way, if we're building this new do-it-all centre, will this free up some of the best real-estate property on the continent for commercial development (Paddington and Potts Point) ?
Nup. It's not a Pentagon building - the Forces desk staffs and the Department of Defence will remain dispersed. It's just a command building.
 

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selling my body since 88'
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there are commanders on the ground and then there are commanders at the base, then there are commanders back in australia, its a rank structure thing, the higher the rank the more seperated from the battle you get, Its the way all militaries are run.
My point exactly. The structure of the military promotes those of distinguish services. Hence those back at base are the ones that really should be on the battlefield. Anyway i know i'm old fashion but modern warfare has shown that nothing has really changed. Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan (USSR + UN) and Serbia. Anyways way off topic.
 

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Lord Melbourne
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We can't let the russkies see the Big Board!


Whats the nearest airfield/barracks? Probably pretty close I'd imagine, incase of situations.
 

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Grow up man. Satellites are one of the most important links in our military chain. Satellites are used for communication, reconnaissance and precision targeting for bombs and missiles. Since satellites can easily be shot down with intercontinental missiles it's also one of our weaker links should we go to war with a missile owning nation.
Read my original post. There is a big difference between militarisation and weaponisation of outer space. Weaponisation is illegal under international law but militarisation is legal to provide check and balance such as foreign nuclear weapon testing.

If we put our weapon on outer space, then there goes another arms race.

So who's going to threaten Australia's national security? China's IBM? Are you sure you want Australia to be in war or arms race with China?
 

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We can't let the russkies see the Big Board!


Whats the nearest airfield/barracks? Probably pretty close I'd imagine, incase of situations.
Fairbairn was the closest airfield, and I would imagine that the site would have its own allocation of some trained and armed troops, perhaps rotated through a nearby base. Who knows for sure these are good details to keep secret.
 

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Lord Melbourne
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thats old school thinking, why would you need a airbase nearby when the closest possible airthreat comes from north of Darwin.
To let the president escape while the nukes rain down of course! :lol: [/movies]

Just wondering, if they need to scramble jets for some reason, or quickly bring someone in/out of the facility form awhile away. Although I guess it's only a 15 min drive from canberra and duntroon/other military buildings.


It'll be our own cruddy version of Cheyenne Mountain or the Pentagon.
 

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Read my original post. There is a big difference between militarisation and weaponisation of outer space. Weaponisation is illegal under international law but militarisation is legal to provide check and balance such as foreign nuclear weapon testing.

If we put our weapon on outer space, then there goes another arms race.

So who's going to threaten Australia's national security? China's IBM? Are you sure you want Australia to be in war or arms race with China?
I'm not proposing any wars, I'm just stating that satellites are used extensively in modern weapon technology and their use will grow further still in the future.
 
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