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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bangladesh to build nuclear power plant

Bangladesh’s emergency government said Sunday it will build a nuclear power plant to meet electricity shortages that have sparked riots and hit the country’s economy.

The International Atomic Energy Commission, the global nuclear watchdog, had approved a government plan to set up a nuclear power plant, interim Energy Minister Tapan Chowdhury told reporters.

"We have now got the approval from the organisation and already there is an offer from (South) Korea to finance 60 percent of the project," he said, without elaborating.

Bangladesh faces massive electricity shortages that have hit its booming textile industry, with generation of 3,000 megawatts at peak times still 2,000 megawatts short of actual demand.

The country’s military-backed government, which took over in January after an emergency was imposed and elections cancelled over vote-rigging allegations, has made tackling the power crisis one of its top priorities.

The World Bank in July last year estimated that Bangladesh needed 10 billion dollars in investment for its electricity supply in the next decade.

Official sources said the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), instructed by the government, is considering reviving an old plan to set up a nuclear power plant.

"Initially, the proposed nuclear power plant may be of 600 MW capacity and it will be set up at Ruppur in Dinajpur where about 260 acres of land was acquired before the country’s independence," a BAEC official told UNB wishing anonymity.

Another source said a high-powered delegation will visit South Korea next month to attend a conference of the IAEA and discuss the matter with a Korean power company which offered Bangladesh to invest in nuclear power plant project.

The source also said an IAEA delegation is now in Dhaka to discuss different nuclear issues with the BAEC officials.

The other countries which got the IAEA approval for setting up nuclear reactor includes Indonesia, Malaysia, Egypt, Morocco and some small countries in central Asia.

As part of the government move to resolve the persisting power crisis, the Advisor said, a high-powered delegation will visit Myanmar to discuss the prospect of setting up a hydropower plant there and thus adding electricity to the national grid.

"We’re considering all kinds of possible options to resolve the power crisis," Tapan said after a meeting at the Power Ministry.

http://www.thebangladeshtoday.com/leading news.htm#lead news-01
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
IAEA allows Bangladesh to install nuclear power plant

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has decided to allow Bangladesh to install nuclear power reactor.

Energy and Power Adviser Tapan Chowdhury disclosed this Sunday while talking to a group of journalists at his office in the secretariat.
"Bangladesh is among eight least developed countries (LDCs) that have been given the IAEA nod for setting up nuclear power plant by 2050," the power adviser said. He said the country has a standing offer from South Korea to install such a plant.

Tapan Chowdhury, however, said that installation of the nuclear power plant is a long-term issue.

A two-member IAEA delegation is now visiting Bangladesh to discuss the country's nuclear energy prospects.

The IAEA delegation will attend the two-day Bangladesh Atomic Energy Council (BAEC) meeting scheduled to start today (Monday).

During the meeting, the IAEA team is expected to fix some modalities and common criteria on atomic energy use to mitigate energy scarcity in the developing countries, a senior Power Division official told the FE.

Sources said among the existing important nuclear facilities in Bangladesh a three megawatt (MW) 'Triga Mark' research reactor is in operation at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) at Savar for carrying out research and development (R&D) activities and production of certain short-lived radioisotopes.

Planning, implementation and operation of nuclear power station in Bangladesh is one of the primary objectives of the BAEC.

According to the IAEA, the total nuclear power installed worldwide by 2004 was 366 giga-watt (GW).

But the agency has projected nuclear power generation to reach 423-592 GW worldwide by 2030.

As of 2004 Asia accounted for 18 of the 26 reactors under construction and for 20 of the last 30 reactors to have been connected to the grid.
There were 440 nuclear power plants (NPPs) worldwide operating at the end of 2004.

Over the course of the year, nuclear power supplied 16% of the world's electricity.

Elsewhere in Asia, nuclear power's absolute and relative contributions are smaller, but China and India in particular plan significant expansion.
India, with 14 operating reactors at the end of 2004, got 2.8 per cent of its electricity from nuclear power by 2004, IAEA statistics revealed.

China, with nine operating reactors at the end of 2004, two under construction and 2.2 per cent of its electricity from nuclear power, plans expansion to 32-40 GW by 2020 for 4-5 per cent of the electricity supply.
In 2004 China's State Council formally approved at least 7 GW of new capacities beyond that already under construction.

http://www.thefinancialexpress-bd.com/search_index.php?page=detail_news&news_id=2269
 

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I have always thought that nuclear power is one of few viable long term solutions to our energy needs...but wasn't sure if the western powers-that-be would allow it. I don't think very highly of IAEA...its intentions are good but since it exercises no authority over the cartel of nations with nuclear weapons, it serves to apply an uneven standard biased against less powerful nations. But such is the world we live in. Anyway, good news; hope it comes to fruition.

At least the guys at the Atomic Energy Comission will actually have some work to do...that institution has been kind of a joke since the split with Pakistan.
 

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Joi Bangla
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Isn't this going to cost the country even more money since we wont be enriching our own uranium hence we will need to import all the required uranium. And thats just the start of the problem. They will also need to find a place to deposit the nuclear waste that is created, safely, and these waste deposits require regular maintenance so as to not contaminate the local environment. All in all, though it meets the power requirements, more cheaper and cleaner options should be explored first.
 

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Joi Bangla
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^^ Cheaper and cleaner option would be nice, but what do you propose for a population our size?
We have massive potential hydro electric and wind resources. The reason developed countries are having trouble switching to these cleaner alternatives is because they have already become dependant on other forms on energy. Us starting from scratch doesn't pose the same dependancy and also these are resources we have domestically and hence wont have to resort to expensive imports.
 

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Our hydroelectric power capacity is exceedingly limited. Already we have flooded a big chunk of the Chittagong Hill Tracks for hydroelectric power...that is precious uncrowded land that we will need when rising ocean levels submerge the low lying areas of the country. The flooding of the Hill Tracts also caused many tribal people to be relocated...and we only have peace today after many years of guerilla insurgency in that area. In a flat land like BD, building dams elsewhere would pretty much inundate a large chunk of the country.

Wind power might be a possiblity in coastal regions, but largely ineffective elsewhere. While I admit I am no expert in this matter, I doubt that can meet the needs of several hundred million. While this technology is certainly clean, it has its problems...where it has been installed here in the US, it has often upset locals with noise and other concerns.
 

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Joi Bangla
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Our hydroelectric power capacity is exceedingly limited. Already we have flooded a big chunk of the Chittagong Hill Tracks for hydroelectric power...that is precious uncrowded land that we will need when rising ocean levels submerge the low lying areas of the country. The submerging of those areas also caused many tribal people to be relocated...and we only have peace today after many years of guerilla insurgency in that area. In a flat land like BD, building dams elsewhere would pretty much inundate a large chunk of the country.

Wind power might be a possiblity in coastal regions, but largely ineffective elsewhere. While I admit I am no expert in this matter, I doubt that can meet the needs of several hundred million. While this technology is certainly clean, it has its problems...where it has been installed here in the US, it has often upset locals with noise and other concerns.
Hydroelectric power doesn't neccesarily have to involve building dams. And we have the highest density of rivers, especially large rivers, in the whole world though your right that it could possibly cause the displacement of many people.
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
all I know is that BD needs power. You could never develop the industries without adequate power. Plus load shedding is a bitch.
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Daewoo ready to fund nuclear power plant in Bangladesh

The South Korean company -- Daewoo Engineering -- has expressed its willingness to provide fund and technology to Bangladesh for setting up a nuclear power plant.

The South Korean company, that has extensive experiences in installing nuclear power plant in many countries across the globe, placed the proposal to the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology (MoSICT) about a month ago, a senior official of the ministry told the FE Monday.

He said as per the proposal, the Daewoo Engineering will provide 70 per cent of the total cost for installing the nuclear power plant in Bangladesh apart from supplying the required technology.

Sources said currently South Korea meets 45 per cent of its electricity needs from nuclear power and the share would continue to rise.
South Korea has so far developed 1000 megawatt (MW) Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant.

The installation cost of a nuclear power plant is around US$ 1.5 million per megawatt (MW) whereas it is $1.0 million for one MW gas-fired combined cycle power plant, a senior Power Division official told the FE.

Energy and Power Adviser Tapan Chowdhury Sunday said the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has decided to allow Bangladesh among seven other developing countries to install nuclear power plants.

He, however, did not elaborate the issue to the newsmen and refrained commenting on whether Bangladesh will install a nuclear reactor soon or consider it later.

A two-member IAEA delegation is now visiting Bangladesh to carry out a study to explore the country's nuclear power prospects.

The IAEA delegation is also attending in a three-day dialogue session with the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC).

Sources from the Ministry of Power, Energy and Mineral Resources (MPEMR) said the IAEA delegation members will meet energy and power adviser today (Tuesday) at the latter's office in the secretariat to discuss on the issue. The MoSICT, however, held a meeting in the secretariat Monday with the MoSICT Secretary in the chair.

The BAEC Chairman, senior government officials of the MoSICT and nuclear energy experts took part in Monday's meeting.

Both the MoSICT Secretary and the BAEC Chairman refused to talk with journalists on the proposal for setting up a nuclear power plant.

http://www.thefinancialexpress-bd.com/search_index.php?page=detail_news&news_id=2381
 

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the thing that I'm worried about is bangladesh turning into another cherynobyl. We don't real have much skilled labor in our country and what if someone causes an accident that could destroy millions of lives and deplete much of the soil, after all we depend on it for our agriculture.
 

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^^ Chernobyl happened in one of the most developed countries in the world,, so availability of skilled labor really wasn't the problem. Carelessness and neglect were the main reasons...since this reactor would be under close scrutiny from several parties, I doubt a similar mistake would happen here. But you are right, there is a risk. But again, risk is an element of all we do in life. There is more chance of dying in a car or airplane crash than of a nuclear meltdown, yet we drive and fly all the time.
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bangladesh mulls setting up two nuclear power plants

Bangladesh mulls setting up two nuclear power plants

Bangladesh is in the final stages of deciding whether to go ahead with its plan to set up two nuclear power reactors, which have already been approved by the global nuclear watchdog IAEA.

Shafiqul Islam Bhuiyan, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) chairman told a high-level meeting chaired by Tapan Chowdhury, the Power and Energy Adviser that the Rooppur site in Pabna district was ready for setting up the nuclear power plants.

Bhuiyan said the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) had given Bangladesh permission to set up the nuclear power plants to meet its soaring energy demands.

The BAEC informed the government that two nuclear power reactors, each with a capacity of 500 MW, could be set up at Rooppur if the government gives its approval.

A presentation on nuclear power plants would be made before Chief Adviser Fakhruddin Ahmed soon for getting the governments approval for resuming the Rooppur nuclear power plant project, the New Age daily quoted sources in the Science and ICT ministry as saying on Monday.

Bhuiyan assured the meeting that there would be no environmental hazards from the planned nuclear plants.

Although around 274 acres of land were acquired along the Padma river at Rooppur in the 1960s and the commission had approached successive governments for funds to set up nuclear power plants there, no meaningful effort was undertaken.

The BAEC chief said that Bangladesh should immediately start the groundwork for setting up the nuclear power plants as the country’s energy deficiency would reach 70 per cent by 2020.

He informed the meeting that the installation cost of a 600 MW nuclear power reactor would be USD 900 million to USD 1.2 billion, while the cost of a 1,000 MW reactor would be around USD 1.5 to USD 2 billion.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/..._nuclear_power_plants/articleshow/2315852.cms
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
IAEA to help set up nuke power plant

In response to an appeal from Dhaka, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has assured assistance in establishing a nuclear power plant in Bangladesh for generating electricity.

This assurance came when Adviser for Science and ICT Tapan Chowdhury called on Deputy Director General and Head of Nuclear Energy of the IAEA Yuri Sokolov in Vienna yesterday, according to a message received here.

During the meeting, the adviser asked for IAEA help in formulating an action plan for the proposed nuclear power plant project for power generation.

The IAEA was also requested to provide technical support for building the plant.

Furthermore, the adviser requested the IAEA to provide support for preparatory work for the Rooppur Power Plant in Pabna.

Yuri Sokolov appreciated the role of Bangladesh in campaigning for the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

He was impressed with the steps taken by Bangladesh in ensuring nuclear-safety standards and assured IAEA assistance in setting up nuclear power plant.

Tapan Chowdhury is leading the Bangladesh delegation to the 51st General Conference of IAEA in Vienna.

In the conference, the adviser said IAEA should help Bangladesh in her efforts to establish nuclear power plant for producing electricity.

"It should also support Bangladesh in providing better treatment to cancer patients," he told the meeting.

The adviser requested IAEA to play a key role in convincing the donor agencies in pledging funds for nuclear power plants for electricity generation in developing countries and the LDCs.

He suggested that international financing for nuclear power plants for electricity generation in the developing countries, including LDCs, should get priority as an environment-friendly approach in the multilateral scheme of Sustainable Environment Management Project (SEMP).

The adviser informed the conference of the steps taken by the government in fighting cancer, and urged IAEA to help Bangladesh in this regard.

Referring to the problem of groundwater contamination with arsenic, he informed the conference about the steps taken by Bangladesh to mitigate the problem, and sought further technical support from the agency.

http://www.thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=4415
 

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Dhaka-Ottawa-DC
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
this is certainly a great news. I hope we can implement this without any delay. I would also hope all steps will be taken to make this a safe project.
 

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Nuke plant is very important for Bangladesh.Probably the only way our power generation capability can cope up with the growing demand.
 

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bleh!
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i doubt setting it up would be so easy i mean sure many major international players will create hurdles and conditions that might make us loose our sovereignty indirectly


*just my personal opinion*
 

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Tetulia theke Teknaf
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i doubt setting it up would be so easy i mean sure many major international players will create hurdles and conditions that might make us loose our sovereignty indirectly


*just my personal opinion*
^^ my opinion too.
 

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^^ Those countries are mostly concerned with new countries obtaining nuclear weapons, so that they don't lose their bully pulpit. Civilian nuclear power plant in BD should not arouse objection as BD is generally not regarded as military threat. At any rate, what are other practical energy options? If there is some better alternative I am all for it but don't know of any myself.
 

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^^ Those countries are mostly concerned with new countries obtaining nuclear weapons, so that they don't lose their bully pulpit. Civilian nuclear power plant in BD should not arouse objection as BD is generally not regarded as military threat. At any rate, what are other practical energy options? If there is some better alternative I am all for it but don't know of any myself.
Well, for starters government should exit the power generation and distribution business and open it up for private enterprizes to take up the expansion. I am sure, once that policy is made, there will be enough players willing to play, just like in the telecommunication industry.

Another idea is to promote conservation. The government could mandate and/or provide incentive for developing "green" buildings, just like they have been doing in California. Sure using environmentally friendly and energy efficient materials increase the cost but that is where the government can step in by providing tax incentive to buyers or subsidy to builders.
 
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