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Now if National had spent money on these things there would have been even more cash to spend on your wish list which would never have been provided by National since the tax cut would probably have been used to pay for a new BMW. Did you buy one with yours?
Try to play the ball Jeff, not the person. I don't know why you always have to make it personal?
 

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Did you stock up on dunny paper in time?

Short of closing all ports and airports there is no way to keep this out. Be thankful the Coalition has spent a fortune upgrading NZ hospitals, because the cash would not have done much good sitting in bank accounts as tax breaks for National's buddies which is what would have happened if they had got in.
You never know the coalition victory might have saved your life.
Getting a little tied of the 9 years of neglect BS
So i did a simple search of one construction company in Auckland Robert Cunningham Construction a mid level company and one project management company RCP

heres a list but by no means a full list of Health work done during Nationals last term in Government.
1. He puna Waiora 46 bed mental health unit at NSH.
2. Te Aka 15 bed medium security mental heath unit at the mason clinic , they also approved the master plan for a further 6 buildings of which one started in Q4 last year.
3. WDHB department of Medicine fit out at NSH.
4.MRI and padium extensions at NSH.
5. New elective surgery centre at NSH.
6. New Dialysis centre at NSH.
7. Muriwal & Wainuma additional beds at Waitakere Hospital.
8. Taraniki base Hospital.

Others off the top of my head
9. Worked commenced on 76 bed mental health unit at Middlemore.
10 emergency department up grade at Waitakere hospital.
11. New main building at Wellington Hospital.
12 New 25 bed mental Health unit at Whangarei Hospital.
13 Maybe a few buildings in Christchurch
14 New teaching building at NSH.

I reiterate items 1-8 are related to one mid level construction company and one project management company in Auckland only
 

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Getting a little tied of the 9 years of neglect BS
So i did a simple search of one construction company in Auckland Robert Cunningham Construction a mid level company and one project management company RCP

heres a list but by no means a full list of Health work done during Nationals last term in Government.
1. He puna Waiora 46 bed mental health unit at NSH.
2. Te Aka 15 bed medium security mental heath unit at the mason clinic , they also approved the master plan for a further 6 buildings of which one started in Q4 last year.
3. WDHB department of Medicine fit out at NSH.
4.MRI and padium extensions at NSH.
5. New elective surgery centre at NSH.
6. New Dialysis centre at NSH.
7. Muriwal & Wainuma additional beds at Waitakere Hospital.
8. Taraniki base Hospital.

Others off the top of my head
9. Worked commenced on 76 bed mental health unit at Middlemore.
10 emergency department up grade at Waitakere hospital.
11. New main building at Wellington Hospital.
12 New 25 bed mental Health unit at Whangarei Hospital.
13 Maybe a few buildings in Christchurch
14 New teaching building at NSH.

I reiterate items 1-8 are related to one mid level construction company and one project management company in Auckland only
And National were going to fix Middlemore, a major Auckland hospital at some time?

Comments from that article and related ones

Middlemore Hospital, in the heart of south Auckland, is home to the busiest emergency department in Australasia.

It is where some of the country's most deprived population come for medical treatment. It's also home to buildings riddled with rot and decay, toxic black mould and asbestos.

A report showed the decay at the Kidz First children's hospital on the same site as Middlemore and at the separate Manukau Superclinic was so advanced there was a danger it would breach the walls and contaminate the air.

It found 90 per cent of the timber framing looked at in the Kidz First hospital was decaying and the wood was soaked, at up to 98 per cent moisture levels. There were several mentions of the presence of stachybotrys, a toxic black mould.

"Should spores from the mould become airborne, these pose a risk to the health of anyone who inhales them, particularly patients who have compromised respiratory systems."

This situation should never have happened, even if it meant delaying the new "flagship" scheme. Do you really think that was satisfactory?
 

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And National were going to fix Middlemore, a major Auckland hospital at some time?

Comments from that article and related ones

Middlemore Hospital, in the heart of south Auckland, is home to the busiest emergency department in Australasia.

It is where some of the country's most deprived population come for medical treatment. It's also home to buildings riddled with rot and decay, toxic black mould and asbestos.

A report showed the decay at the Kidz First children's hospital on the same site as Middlemore and at the separate Manukau Superclinic was so advanced there was a danger it would breach the walls and contaminate the air.

It found 90 per cent of the timber framing looked at in the Kidz First hospital was decaying and the wood was soaked, at up to 98 per cent moisture levels. There were several mentions of the presence of stachybotrys, a toxic black mould.

"Should spores from the mould become airborne, these pose a risk to the health of anyone who inhales them, particularly patients who have compromised respiratory systems."

This situation should never have happened, even if it meant delaying the new "flagship" scheme. Do you really think that was satisfactory?
More claims and nothing to back them up with.

How many more hospitals beds to we have compared to 2017 Jeff?
 

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https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/112636825/rot-decay-and-mould-the-long-road-to-fixing-middlemore-hospital
More claims and nothing to back them up with.

How many more hospitals beds to we have compared to 2017 Jeff?
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/112636825/rot-decay-and-mould-the-long-road-to-fixing-middlemore-hospital
More claims and nothing to back them up with.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/manukau-courier/102690557/sewage-leak-adds-to-list-of-problems-at-middlemore-hospital

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/112636825/rot-decay-and-mould-the-long-road-to-fixing-middlemore-hospital
https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/388330/middlemore-hospital-still-faces-firestopping-defects-after-200-repairs

https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/386122/middlemore-hospital-was-warned-patients-at-extreme-risk-from-fire-documents-show

Firestopping defects by the numbers

90 priority one defects fixed already
130 priority two defects fixed already
82 unfixed defects across all CM Health facilities:

17 of the 82 ranked priority one - action required immediately (10 of these identified in 2019 inspections)

19 priority 2 - action required within 6 months

46 priority 3 - action required when finances are available or within 12 months


https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/102791581/health-system-underfunding-worse-than-pm-expected-as-more-problems-uncovered-at-middlemore-hospital

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/102490810/mould-in-middlemore-hospital-buildings-so-advanced-it-could-breach-walls-report-shows?rm=m

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/104369189/dhb-looking-at-options-for-future-of-earthquakeprone-middlemore-hospital-building?rm=m

https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/national/govt-unveils-80m-to-fix-leaking-rotting-middlemore-hospital/

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the funding announced today would go towards fixing issues, such as leaky hospital buildings, rot and mould in the walls, and earthquake-prone facilities.

She said these issues were all "symptoms of years of neglect and underinvestment" from the previous Government

https://countiesmanukau.health.nz/news/questions-and-answers-whats-happening-at-middlemore-hospital/
 

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Yea I heard some of our hospitals had sewage running down the walls. They were in a terrible state. I did not hear of any "falling down" though. DO you have a link to this claim?
I've heard that claim repeated many times, but nobody has ever been able to back it up with photographic evidence, which I'm positive would have been published if it existed.

You did not answer my question and chose once again to side step it.

Unless you can come back with some real numbers your are once again just blowing more hot air!
You have to remember with Jeff he's said several times he's really old, and as you know old people don't listen to younger people, even when younger people provide clear evidence that they are correct, older people like Jeff still refuse to believe the evidence placed before them.

Arguing with Jeff is like discussing the bountiful joys of bacon with a vegan, its pointless.
 

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Globetrotting Climate Change Minister James Shaw spent most on international travel

https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/02/climate-change-minister-james-shaw-spent-most-on-international-travel.html

The Green Party's co-leader James Shaw spent more on international air travel than any other minister, new data shows.

The Climate Change Minister had $77,771 approved for international travel from October to the end of December, compared to $54,487 for Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, data from the Department of Internal Affairs shows.

No other minister's international travel expenses came close to Mr Shaw's total. The second highest was the Prime Minister, followed by Energy Minister Megan Woods and Finance Minister Grant Robertson, respectively.
He should have "hypocrisy" stamped on his forehead.
 

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I've heard that claim repeated many times, but nobody has ever been able to back it up with photographic evidence, which I'm positive would have been published if it existed.



You have to remember with Jeff he's said several times he's really old, and as you know old people don't listen to younger people, even when younger people provide clear evidence that they are correct, older people like Jeff still refuse to believe the evidence placed before them.

Arguing with Jeff is like discussing the bountiful joys of bacon with a vegan, its pointless.
Seems to me that after the collection of news articles I posted, these younger people want to close their eye to reality and go back to sleep.
Trump tried the same thing with Corona Virus and look what has happened.
 

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https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12295554

If you thought that the lack of spending affected only Middlemore, think again.

Leaky pipes and failing equipment

Counties isn't alone; documents obtained by the Weekend Herald reveal more than half of the country's 20 DHBs identified infrastructure issues as a major risk to the treatment and safety of patients.

Risks identified include "extreme" age of buildings that aren't fit for treatment purposes, equipment on the brink of breaking down, leaky and earthquake-prone buildings, malfunctioning medication fridges and lifts used for urgent patient transfers, not enough beds in units over 100 per cent capacity and fire hazards related to old wiring systems.

Lakes District flagged a "risk of harm to patient and/or staff due to current limitations, clinical resourcing and equipment for neonatal transfer".

At Hawke's Bay, DHB hospital infrastructure was judged "cramped, ageing and outdated", which was "causing significant issues for patients and staff".

Waitematā DHB warned some buildings weren't meeting compliance standards and old buildings risked "impacting on patient safety and experience".

Northland DHB identified "ageing radiology equipment that could fail", and Wellington Regional Hospital will soon start repairs on pinhole leaks in hot water piping.

Health Minister David Clark says the Government is responding but a recent survey of buildings and facilities in the health sector has underlined a "huge" problem.

"The Treasury's best estimate is that about $14 billion will be needed to be invested over the next decade, and that may well yet prove to be a conservative estimate."

All DHBs keep high-level registers that record the biggest risks to the organisation, its staff and patients. These are regularly updated, each risk judged according to likelihood and severity, and mitigation actions put in place.

The Weekend Herald sought registers through the Official Information Act. Some DHBs including Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Canterbury and Southern refused to release that information, claiming doing so would discourage the future identification of risks.

However, most health boards were transparent and recognised the information was clearly in the public interest. They stress entries reflect potential risks and don't necessarily mean actual failure or harm has already happened.

Overall, there were more than 50 risks relating to infrastructure listed by the 13 DHBs that released recent registers.

The situation is particularly pressing in MidCentral DHB, which stretches from the west to the east coast of the North Island and includes Palmerston North.

Senior doctors at Palmerston North recently wrote a letter to bosses and Clark, warning "we cannot assure the safety, dignity and comfort of care provided to our patients when faced with such physical constraints".

The letter was leaked and the DHB's chief executive, Kathryn Cook, told media new facilities were planned but the city really needed a new hospital.

"The facilities are poor," she admitted. "What it means is the clinicians, including our doctors, have to work really hard to ensure they're delivering good-quality care. It puts pressure on them and they're feeling that."

MidCentral's risk register reveals more than 20 operational risk entries related to infrastructure, including renal, gastroenterology and ambulatory care units being too small to meet growing demand.

Malfunctioning medical equipment and medication fridges were listed, and a lack of hospital bed space during busy times. More serious problems: no dedicated emergency obstetric operating theatre and no cardiac facility, used for diagnostic angiograms and procedures, including putting in pacemakers.

The DHB says work is taking place or planned, such as more bed space, including in relocatable "pod" buildings next to the ED department and surgical suite. The planned acute services block will be a long-term solution to demand on ED, theatre and intensive care.

The measles outbreak that swept through South Auckland showed the threat from infectious disease, but some hospitals aren't properly equipped to respond.

The close proximity of patients, lack of isolation facilities and inability to care for more than two patients needing isolation in the emergency department worried MidCentral DHB, documents reveal, and no negative pressure rooms at Timaru Hospital meant there was a safety risk to patients and staff in the event of outbreaks of diseases like measles, chickenpox, pandemic flu and shingles. Whangārei Hospital acknowledged a risk from not having a positive pressure room in a ward.

Negative pressure rooms use lower air pressure to prevent internal air from leaving a space, allowing patients with infectious conditions to be isolated. In contrast, a positive pressure room keeps out germs and particles and thus protects from infection and disease.

Infrastructure problems often affect some of the most vulnerable patients. Six DHBs recorded major risks relating to demand on mental health facilities, or "not fit for purpose" buildings.

They include Waitematā, MidCentral, Tairawhiti, Capital and Coast, Hutt Valley and Lakes District. The latter warned of a "risk of harm to self or others in the inpatient mental health unit due to the acuity of patients in a suboptimal environment".

Auckland DHB refused to release its register, but other documents reveal seriously unwell patients were discharged from its acute mental health facility because there weren't enough beds for long periods. Staff reported "spending too much time fire fighting", "tension/angst amongst staff" and "no time for triage".

Waitematā DHB runs the region's forensic psychiatric services and is in the midst of rebuilding the leaky Mason Clinic, including a new $22 million, 15-bed medium secure unit expected to open towards the end of this year. The DHB estimates capacity at the clinic's Point Chevalier campus will need to double in the long-term and has previously warned the ministry of capacity problems, including intellectually disabled women sharing bedroom corridors with "predatory" men. It recently bought a block of land that will let the site expand by 2.8ha.

Its services have often run at 100 per cent bed capacity. In June, a hospital advisory committee report described how that affected care: "The adult inpatient units have experienced 85 per cent occupancy twice, lasting only a few days at a time. This is the first time the target has been reached in over three years ... benefits have been significant over the two brief periods with improvements in the quality of care for people both in the inpatient units and in the community."

At the other end of the country, a ward of Dunedin's Wakari Hospital, which holds people with an intellectual disability or with both an intellectual disability and mental health issues, recorded more than 500 physical assaults by patients on staff over 2017 and 2018 and 400 physical assaults by patients on patients.

The DHB's director of nursing outlined concerns about the state of Wakari buildings in a January 2019 report, saying, "these, for the most part, are original 1990s condition and do not support the delivery of safe (for patients and staff) contemporary acute and sub-acute mental health care".

New builds are planned in some areas, including MidCentral DHB, which will upgrade its acute adult inpatient mental health unit by 2022, and Tairawhiti. The ministry is also reviewing forensic mental health services, including the buildings they are currently using.

Budget 2019 set aside $1.7b for upgrading and building new hospital facilities. Projects already announced by the Labour-led Government include mental health facilities in Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Gisborne.

A major upgrade of Taranaki Base Hospital will cost $300m, and Auckland City Hospital, Greenlane Clinical Centre and North Shore Hospital have received capital funding boosts for projects including new elective surgery and stroke units.

Whangārei Hospital gets $24m for new endoscopy and cardiac facilities.

In the South, new emergency department and outpatient facilities will be built at Queenstown's Lakes District Hospital, and Dunedin Hospital will be rebuilt at a cost of up to $1.4b - one of the largest infrastructure projects in New Zealand and due to be completed by November 2028. The current hospital is leaky and riddled with asbestos, meaning patient records are fetched by staff in hazardous materials suits.

Clark says he was "horrified" to learn the health system had no standardised register of assets and pulling one together was one of his first acts as minister. An early version outlines the scope of the problem, but he declined to give specifics.

"We have a lot of buildings across New Zealand that have seismic issues, that have leaky building issues or just simply are no longer fit for purpose and the job ahead is huge."

Finance Minister Grant Robertson recently announced the Government will spend an extra $12b on infrastructure, split across new roading, rail, schools and healthcare projects. About $300m will go to DHBs for asset renewal and bigger hospital projects will be separately budgeted for.

Key measures of New Zealanders' health, such as reduced death and disability, are improving at rates comparable to similar countries, despite us spending increasingly less. That can't continue without upgrading hospitals, Clark says.

"I take my hat off to and want to acknowledge the work of clinicians, nurses and allied health workers who continue to provide an amazing health service in facilities that often are not fit for purpose.

"There is no doubt that the very limited investment over the last decade has had an impact. Buildings which should have been replaced or refurbished were not."

There is of course more but in the interests of brevity.....

Us old folks realise youngsters have only a short attention span!

I am really sorry no one has posted the photos of poo for "M" but if they were he would probably then demand for a "smell" record too. It is of course no different from any other poo!
 

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Sounds like another "personal attack". And just after what someone had just complained about the same thing? Amazing!
He is a hypocrite. What would you call him? A Saint?

By the way, when I was referring to personal attacks, I was referring to personal attacks you make on other forum members here.
 

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There is not much point in debating which government invests more in major infrastructure or whether a given government has invested enough in health/education/roads/rail etc...

Remember that it's usually better for a government to place investment in major infrastructure during the lull in the economic cycles... No government wants an overheated boom economy since it tends to aggravate inflation and results in upward pressure in interest rates.

Conversely, when an economy is sluggish, governments can use investment in infrastructure as a key mechanism to help soften the impact of economic tough times...

So while it's always good to have a continual stream of constant building of new schools, new hospitals, new roads, new bridges, new airports, new council buildings, new swimming pools and so on... in practise, its better to invest in these when there is a decline in private commercial activity.

By the same token, governments don't want to be completely reckless... During the 1970's/80s the government invested big in "Think Big", which very nearly meant that we bit off more than we could chew, and the following Labour govt had to massively reign in expenditure, which continued well into the 1990's under National which saw investment in roading for example pretty much dry up completely.

The other point I'd mention is that major infrastructure has a high value which is capitalised over many years... For example a major highway, while the money is spent in a few years during construction, it's capitalised over perhaps 30-40 years... So it means that there possibly won't need to be another major significant project in the same area for some time. A good example of this is say Chch Hospital, which has in the last 20 years had a brand new hospital for Maternity (Chch Womens), New A&E/Acute Services, and new hospital at Burwood, new Outpatients building and so on... It therefore means that we can't expect a similar investment in Chch hospital infrastructure for the next few government terms or so since it pretty much won't need it.

So to summarise, the debate over which invests more is largely moot since in the last 3 terms that each has had, we've seen extremes at investment levels from both parties. Again, the investment levels tends to be more closely related to the prevailing economic conditions and the governments financial position as opposed to something a simple as whether it's National or Labour in power.
 

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All coronavirus discussion has been moved to the General Chit Chat Thread to avoid the inevitable off-topic discussion that will otherwise dominate this thread.

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=500470&page=185

You may have also noted recent posts on this thread being deleted. Any posts with insults directed to any member will be deleted (or the post modified as appropriate). Please keep this discussion respectful. Other posts which a particular member may find related to New Zealand politics (but an ordinary reasonable person would not due to its clear sole purpose to evoke reaction from other members) will also be deleted.

If you have a topic you wish to discuss, but does not relate to New Zealand politics, please use the General Chit Chat Thread to keep this topic clean and so all members can have an expectation when viewing this thread that there will be a discussion relating to the thread title. That thread will also be loosely moderated as nothing will be classed as off-topic. This does not mean that other posting rules do not apply.

Cheers
 

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Ministers are rushing to prevent the country's construction sector hollowing out under coronavirus lockdown.
However, they've also admitted the state's role in construction will massively expand in a way unheard of in several generations. That could include turning Crown Infrastructure Partners into a new Ministry of Works-style government department.
Government ministers announced two measures aimed at shoring up confidence within the country's construction sector on Wednesday morning. The first was the establishment of an Infrastructure Industry Reference Group to pick out "shovel-ready" projects exceeding $10 million that could be taken up within six months.

The second was a move from Minister of Transport Phil Twyford to make advance payments to construction companies who were on contract to the NZTA, but unable to work during the lockdown.
Both measures are aimed at encouraging the construction sector not to let sub-contractors and others go as construction work grinds to a halt.
"I think some of the most grave situations are half-complete projects. The cash-flow has dried up as demand thins," Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones said.
He believes in a post Covid-19 world the Government will have to greatly expand its involvement in the construction sector.

"Phil Twyford and I are working through some scenarios that would change the character and the purpose and the size of Crown Infrastructure [Partners]," Jones said.
"I don't think it's credible for us to run infrastructure in the way [we have] where essentially NZTA has no workforce that actually does the work. It's all outsourced. That model is defunct. It's gone."
Answering questions on whether the Ministry of Works would be revived at the end of the country's Covid-19 recovery Twyford said he "wouldn't want to rule out that more hands-on approach", and Jones said he was strongly in favour of it.
"We're receiving a great deal of advice. And I have to say quite a lot of senior identities in the infrastructure community have already put forward the notion of something akin to the Ministry of Works," Jones said.
"The term Ministry of Works I realise might lead to allergic reactions. I'm far more allergic to the prospect of 15 percent of my fellow New Zealanders being consigned to joblessness," he said.
"I don't want to be engaged in ideological tussles with people who have a hang-up about the term 'Ministry of Works'. I'm saying show the hang-ups you've got for the 15 percent of Kiwis that are likely to be in the ranks of the jobless."
The old Ministry of Works and its predecessor the Public Works Department constructed much of the country's core infrastructure including electricity and rail infrastructure. Its operations were also a major source of employment.
'It cannot be business as usual'

Crown Infrastructure Partners Chairman Mark Binns was announced as the head of the Infrastructure Industry Reference Group on Wednesday morning.
Twyford said the group's main role would be to pick out projects that were ready to go and where much of the planning work had already been done.
Members of the reference group include NZTA chairman Sir Brian Roche, KiwiRail chief executive Greg Miller, and Infrastructure Commission chairman Alan Bollard.
A member of the Construction Industry Accord will join the group at a later date.
The group will work alongside the Provincial Development Unit (PDU) and the Infrastructure Commission.
Ideas for projects would be solicited from a range of different agencies including councils.
Employment and the "multiplier effect" of certain infrastructure investments would be a key consideration where funding was concerned, Twyford said.
He said "three waters" assets could also be eligible for consideration. Those assets have been highlighted as a major future cost for councils.
All investments will come on top of already-announced infrastructure investments like the $12b New Zealand Upgrade Programme.
Jones said the group would also explore the answer to a deeper question too: "What is to be the role of the Crown in a recessionary environment in infrastructure?"
"Because it cannot be business as usual," Jones said.

Twyford believes a major lesson learnt from past failures to get big infrastructure projects off the ground was that there has been a lack of capacity to drive them forward at the scale needed.
"Government needs to have strong organisations capable of making these big projects happen," Twyford said.
"That capacity simply didn't exist. We didn't have the levers to do what we wanted to do," he said.
"That's why Kāinga Ora was created. So that we had an organisation with the balance sheet, values and the ambition to drive a massive government build programme."
"My view is that in a new economic environment we need to be able to really revisit the assumptions that we've had in the last few decades."
'Timid' days are over
Jones said tourism and international education would no longer be major industries for New Zealand. He believed manufacturing and other forms of industrial production based in the provinces would pick up the slack.
However the turmoil will take a toll. He cited estimates that unemployment would rise to 15 percent and noted that rate would likely be higher for Māori and Pacific Island workers.
"Over 200,000 New Zealanders will be out of work...we cannot leave such a large number of, largely, young people on the scrapheap," Jones said.
He said an infrastructure financing and construction model "mired in red tape" was no longer fit for purpose in those circumstances.
"The equation is quite simple. Why would we allow projects to be hampered at a time when 15 percent of the population will be in the jobseeker queue. What political fool thinks that's a good idea," Jones said.
"I can guarantee this 'business-as-usual' of us timidly sitting by managing contracts, those days are over," he said.
 

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This will be interesting to see how Phil Twyfords plans go... Obviously at this stage, it's not much more than an idea and clearly there is a long way to go before that idea could become a reality.

Personally I'm more in favour of private industry rather than what often turns out to being large government owned money pits of inefficiency... However there is a time and place for governments to own and operate such organisations such as the Ministry of Works.. I would say general government buildings should be built more by private sector since they'll have mass scale as there is a whole industry here that provides for the private sector... But roads, rail and bridges are typically only ever built for governments and councils, so there is little need for the private sector to get involved.
 

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Twyford doesn't have to look very far for a big infrastructure project that didn't get off the ground. Neither he nor Jones mention incompetent meddling Minister's as an impediment but again each only has to look in the mirror to see the truth.

There's also a reason why MoW is treated with derision.
 

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Twyford doesn't have to look very far for a big infrastructure project that didn't get off the ground. Neither he nor Jones mention incompetent meddling Minister's as an impediment but again each only has to look in the mirror to see the truth.

There's also a reason why MoW is treated with derision.
Quite true... governments are famous for meddling and favouring pork-barrel projects and other issues... Plus the government tends to be less prudent on cost over-runs than private sector..

Having said that, it will remove one key problem that has dogged the private sector for a while... that is the endless low-balling of price tendering. The key reason we have so many issues with projects which the government ends up paying for is because they are fixated on always going for the cheapest price on everything. This will remove that element and while we may pay a little bit more for civil construction projects, at least we might end up with some quality.
 
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