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I think it is quite common for recent arrivals to have 3 generations under the one roof.

Be interesting when and if ever the census stats come out , if there has been an overall lift in the number of people per house hold.
 

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Between 2001 and 2013, the number of people in New Zealand increased by 561,600. During this period the average number of people per household remained static at 2.70, measured at the 2001, 2006 and 2013 census.
 

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Sorry, this is a long post, but it's something I find interesting...

Been looking at the population of New Zealand's second and third largest Urban & Metro areas, Wellington and Christchurch to see how those cities are growing and comparing.

I find it quite remarkabe how these two urban areas seem to be tracking so close to each other in population for pretty much most of the last 50 or more years... even more so when considering that both cities are very different economically with Wellington having a predominant government/white collar economy, while Christchurch having a large blue collar economy.

Even so, Wellington Urban has typically been slightly more populous of the two cities, with Christchurch Urban only edging ahead of Wellington for the first time in recent history in 2007 before losing ground to them again in 2011 after the Canterbury earthquakes. On the Metro Area metric however, Wellington was still trumps as the closest Christchurch got was in 2010 which sat about 8000 short only to slip further behind in the following few years.

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Interesting analysis. it's hard to see where more people will go in Wellington - we're absolutely jam packed here - if you look at Christchurch, land is plentiful - they have room to grow. It wouldn't surprise me if Chch blows past Wellington in 10-15 years as housing here in Wellington is unaffordable and the supply is minimal - I don't think it can hold much longer - whereas chch housing is easily affordable in comparison. Hamilton vs Tauranga is close too. But I feel Tauranga will never quite catch up to Hamilton.
 

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I think that we are going to see the continuing trend of high to semi-high rise apartments proliferating in central Wellington. There are large areas around the city that can be "landscaped" to accommodate traditional housing developments, such as the new Kelson housing site, which required the removal of 400,000 cubic metres of earth to flatten an area to build 240 houses.

This is where I see Wellington moving, with a combination of landscaping green field developments, combined with dense urban apartment living, that will cater to the growing population.

The advantage that Wellington holds over Christchurch is the commuter rail network, which enables thousands of people to work and play in the CBD, and will ensure that it continues to be relevant in the future.
 

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In the period 2001 to 2013 did we build 208,000 homes?
It appears we did +a few more...

http://archive.stats.govt.nz/~/media/Statistics/Census/2013 Census/data-tables/population-dwelling/population-dwelling-rc-ta.xls

(Table 3s and 4)

Occupied and Unoccupied dwelling count

2001 Occupied 1,368,207 unoccupied 147,435
2006 Occupied 1,478,709 unoccupied 159,273
2013 Occupied 1,570,695 unoccupied 185,445

2001-2013 Occupied = +202,488 unoccupied +38,010 = +240,498
 

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great,
therefore between 5 March 2013 and 5May 2019 where there was an increase of 722,759 if housing stock increased by 267,688 the rate of 2.7 per house hold would stay the same.
 

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Interesting analysis. it's hard to see where more people will go in Wellington - we're absolutely jam packed here - if you look at Christchurch, land is plentiful - they have room to grow. It wouldn't surprise me if Chch blows past Wellington in 10-15 years as housing here in Wellington is unaffordable and the supply is minimal - I don't think it can hold much longer - whereas chch housing is easily affordable in comparison. Hamilton vs Tauranga is close too. But I feel Tauranga will never quite catch up to Hamilton.
Agree, and historically, because of Wellingtons very cyclical political influence, when Labour is in and government services expand, Wellington grows steadily... and when National is in and government services contract, Wellingtons growth slows.

And yes, as it becomes more expensive due to land constraint, it will push people out much like Auckland is doing which seems to be creating strong growth in Hamilton and Tauranga, however Wellington's Metro Area still has lots of scope for in-filling... While Wellington City itself is moderately dense, Lower Hutt on the other hand is sprawl much like Christchurch.
 

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Agree, and historically, because of Wellingtons very cyclical political influence, when Labour is in and government services expand, Wellington grows steadily... and when National is in and government services contract, Wellingtons growth slows.

And yes, as it becomes more expensive due to land constraint, it will push people out much like Auckland is doing which seems to be creating strong growth in Hamilton and Tauranga, however Wellington's Metro Area still has lots of scope for in-filling... While Wellington City itself is moderately dense, Lower Hutt on the other hand is sprawl much like Christchurch.
Absolutely. The suburban sprawl which is sadly a part of the mix needs to be in the Hutt Valley - which has good transport links. That said, Wellington City could and should intensify and have more apt building and densification.

That covers and attracts the younger generations, who bring and preserve the vibrancy which peters off once people decamp to far flung suburban neighbourhoods. Plus they walk/cycle/pt to work, and are far more sustainable in an urban environment in terms of space occupied and resources needed. Te Aro should be full of apartments, and Newtown too.
 

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Quite right, and I think the demographics support this. Young families tend to focus on a house in the suburbs, close to amenities and transport links, whereas most young singles tend to congregate towards inner-city apartment living, where they are close to the things that matter to them, namely, social oriented activities and a great vibe.

The older generation is attracted to the quieter suburbs, and good amenities, hence the proliferation of retirement villages.

We will see more intensification in the CBD, more sprawl in the suburbs, and areas such as Lower Hutt and Petone will also be key areas for intensification.
 

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The older generation is attracted to the quieter suburbs, and good amenities, hence the proliferation of retirement villages.
I Think you will find that this is becoming less true, or the definition of "older generation" is changing

I know plenty of recently retired people who are moving into places like central wellington, they want to be able to go out to movies and the theatre and dinner etc,

"older" might kick in in their 80s but their 60s is a time to act 40 years younger, they are nowhere near curling up with a rug on their knees....

its will be very interesting to see how much of this shows up the 2018 census data ( when its finally out)
 

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^^ Plus modern retirement villages are at least as dense as most apartment complexes

They are the most intense form of densification in Auckland's leafy suburbs
 

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Migration figures year ended April 2019.
overall gain 55,800.

interesting number of New Zealand citizens leaving continues to rise , overall lose of 10,200.

https://www.stats.govt.nz/information-releases/international-migration-april-2019
That's because most kiwis in NZ can't see the wood for the trees...

The reason NZ has moderately strong immigration is because it IS a highly desirable country to migrate to.... yet many Kiwis continually seem to feel disenchanted with their own back yard as though the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

New Zealand isn't perfect, it never will be... but for the 35-odd countries I've spent time in over the last 20 years, there are about half a dozen that I would consider to be excellent, and one of them is NZ.
 

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That's because most kiwis in NZ can't see the wood for the trees...

The reason NZ has moderately strong immigration is because it IS a highly desirable country to migrate to.... yet many Kiwis continually seem to feel disenchanted with their own back yard as though the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

New Zealand isn't perfect, it never will be... but for the 35-odd countries I've spent time in over the last 20 years, there are about half a dozen that I would consider to be excellent, and one of them is NZ.
That certainly accounts for some kiwis who leave. And completely agree with you how well NZ holds up as a place to live. No doubt some of the folk who move, myself and family included, do so knowing full well how good we had it, but just want to seek out something different. But I'm also one of those who will be moving back to NZ as I love the place.
 

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That's because most kiwis in NZ can't see the wood for the trees...

The reason NZ has moderately strong immigration is because it IS a highly desirable country to migrate to.... yet many Kiwis continually seem to feel disenchanted with their own back yard as though the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

New Zealand isn't perfect, it never will be... but for the 35-odd countries I've spent time in over the last 20 years, there are about half a dozen that I would consider to be excellent, and one of them is NZ.
Agree completely, I have lived in 4 continents, and 7 countries, and my conclusion is that most countries have their pros and cons, but New Zealanders seem to have a need to go out and see what the world has to offer, before they realise that New Zealand compares very well the best, and far better than most.

I understand this fascination with moving overseas, because we can often feel isolated where we are, and there is a yearning, especially when we are young, to experience a closer association with other cultures and countries. We feel like we are missing out if we don't explore living and working overseas.

A lot of these people do end up returning to NZ later in life, when the novelty has worn thin, and they start to feel a new yearning, for their homeland. Many people who immigrate to NZ have already experienced a great deal more of the world than New Zealanders, therefore, they can appreciate what NZ has to offer, instead of taking everything for granted, and failing to appreciate that a country is only as good as the people who live in it.
 
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